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1.  Distinct anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia: a cluster analysis study 
Brain  2009;132(11):2932-2946.
The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by changes in personality and behaviour. It is typically associated with frontal lobe atrophy, although patterns of atrophy are heterogeneous. The objective of this study was to examine case-by-case variability in patterns of grey matter atrophy in subjects with the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia and to investigate whether behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia can be divided into distinct anatomical subtypes. Sixty-six subjects that fulfilled clinical criteria for a diagnosis of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia with a volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scan were identified. Grey matter volumes were obtained for 26 regions of interest, covering frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, striatum, insula and supplemental motor area, using the automated anatomical labelling atlas. Regional volumes were divided by total grey matter volume. A hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis using Ward's clustering linkage method was performed to cluster the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia subjects into different anatomical clusters. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess patterns of grey matter loss in each identified cluster of subjects compared to an age and gender-matched control group at P < 0.05 (family-wise error corrected). We identified four potentially useful clusters with distinct patterns of grey matter loss, which we posit represent anatomical subtypes of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. Two of these subtypes were associated with temporal lobe volume loss, with one subtype showing loss restricted to temporal lobe regions (temporal-dominant subtype) and the other showing grey matter loss in the temporal lobes as well as frontal and parietal lobes (temporofrontoparietal subtype). Another two subtypes were characterized by a large amount of frontal lobe volume loss, with one subtype showing grey matter loss in the frontal lobes as well as loss of the temporal lobes (frontotemporal subtype) and the other subtype showing loss relatively restricted to the frontal lobes (frontal-dominant subtype). These four subtypes differed on clinical measures of executive function, episodic memory and confrontation naming. There were also associations between the four subtypes and genetic or pathological diagnoses which were obtained in 48% of the cohort. The clusters did not differ in behavioural severity as measured by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory; supporting the original classification of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia in these subjects. Our findings suggest behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia can therefore be subdivided into four different anatomical subtypes.
doi:10.1093/brain/awp232
PMCID: PMC2768663  PMID: 19762452
behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia; atrophy; cluster analysis; voxel-based morphometry
2.  Very Early Semantic Dementia With Progressive Left≫Right Temporal Lobe Atrophy: An Eight-Year Longitudinal Study 
Archives of neurology  2008;65(12):1659-1663.
Background
Semantic dementia (SD) is a syndrome within the spectrum of frontotemporal lobar degenerations (FTLD) characterized by fluent progressive aphasia (particularly anomia) and loss of word meaning.
Objective
To report a unique case of very early semantic dementia with slowly progressive course allowing insights into the early natural history of this disorder.
Design
Case report.
Setting
Tertiary care university hospital and academic center.
Patient
A 62-year-old female retired teacher presenting with “memory” complaints.
Main Outcome Measures
Clinical course, neuropsychological data, MRI.
Results
The patient was first evaluated when standard neuropsychological measures were normal, but subtle left anterior temporal lobe atrophy was present. Over the follow-up period of eight years, she developed profound anomia and loss of word meaning associated with progressive left anterior temporal lobe atrophy consistent with semantic dementia. In more recent years, anterograde memory impairment as well as mild prosopagnosia have evolved in association with left hippocampal atrophy and subtle atrophy in the homologous gyri of the right anterior temporal lobe. She remains functionally independent despite her current deficits.
Conclusions
Early identification of patients who will develop semantic dementia is difficult and might be missed with standard clinical, neuropsychological, and structural neuroimaging evaluations. Recognition of this relatively rare syndrome is important for early diagnosis and prognostication, and particularly for therapeutic interventions in the future.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2008.507
PMCID: PMC2902001  PMID: 19064755
frontotemporal lobar degeneration; semantic dementia; MRI; neuropsychology
3.  Hippocampal Volumes, Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Metabolites, and Cerebrovascular Disease in Mild Cognitive Impairment Subtypes 
Archives of neurology  2008;65(12):1621-1628.
Background
Although a majority of patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) progress to Alzheimer disease, the natural history of nonamnestic MCI (naMCI) is less clear. Noninvasive imaging surrogates for underlying pathological findings in MCI would be clinically useful for identifying patients who may benefit from disease-specific treatments at the prodromal stage of dementia.
Objective
To determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton MR spectroscopy (1H MRS) profiles of MCI subtypes.
Design
Case-control study.
Setting
Community-based sample at a tertiary referral center.
Patients
Ninety-one patients with single-domain aMCI, 32 patients with multiple-domain aMCI, 20 patients with single- or multiple-domain naMCI, and 100 cognitively normal elderly subjects frequency-matched by age and sex.
Main Outcome Measures
Posterior cingulate gyrus 1H MRS metabolite ratios, hippocampal volumes, and cerebrovascular disease on MRI.
Results
Patients with single-domain aMCI were characterized by small hippocampal volumes and elevated ratios of myo-inositol to creatine levels. Patients with naMCI on average had normal hippocampal volumes and 1H MRS metabolite ratios, but a greater proportion (3 of 20 patients [15%]) had cortical infarctions compared with patients with single-domain aMCI (6 of 91 [7%]). For characterization of MCI subtypes, 1H MRS and structural MRI findings were complementary.
Conclusions
The MRI and 1H MRS findings in singledomain aMCI are consistent with a pattern similar to that of Alzheimer disease. Absence of this pattern on average in patients with naMCI suggests that cerebrovascular disease and other neurodegenerative diseases may be contributing to the cognitive impairment in many individuals with naMCI.
doi:10.1001/archneur.65.12.1621
PMCID: PMC2743393  PMID: 19064749
4.  Beta-amyloid burden is not associated with rates of brain atrophy 
Annals of neurology  2008;63(2):204-212.
Objective
To test the hypothesis that beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden is associated with rates of brain atrophy.
Methods
Forty-five subjects who had been prospectively studied, died, and had an autopsy diagnosis of low, intermediate, or high probability of Alzheimer's disease that had two volumetric head MRI scans were identified. Compact, as well as total (compact + diffuse) Aβ burden was measured using a computerized image analyzer with software program to detect the proportion of grey matter occupied by Aβ. Visual ratings of Aβ burden were also performed. The boundary-shift integral (BSI) was used to calculate change over time in whole brain and ventricular volume. All BSI results were annualized by adjusting for scan interval. Demographics, cognitive measures, clinical diagnoses, apolipoprotein E genotype, neurofibrillary tangle pathology, and vascular lesion burden were determined.
Results
There was no correlation between compact or total Aβ burden, or visual Aβ ratings, and rates of brain loss or ventricular expansion in all subjects. However, significant correlations were observed between rates of brain loss and age, Braak stage, and change over time in cognitive measures. These features also correlated with rates of ventricular expansion. The rates of brain loss and ventricular expansion were greater in demented compared to non-demented subjects.
Interpretation
These findings suggest that rate of brain volume loss is not determined by the amount of insoluble Aβ in the grey matter.
doi:10.1002/ana.21223
PMCID: PMC2735194  PMID: 17894374
5.  Atrophy Rates Accelerate in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment 
Neurology  2007;70(19 Pt 2):1740-1752.
Background
We tested if rates of brain atrophy accelerate in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) as they progress to typical late onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We included comparisons to aMCI subjects who did not progress (labeled aMCI-S) and also to cognitively normal elderly subjects (CN).
Methods
We studied 46 aMCI subjects who progressed to AD (labeled aMCI-P), 46 CN, and 23 aMCI-S. All subjects must have had three or more serial MRI scans. Rates of brain shrinkage and ventricular expansion were measured across all available serial MRI scans in each subject. Change in volumes relative to the point at which subjects progressed to a clinical diagnosis of AD (the index date) was modeled in aMCI-P. Change in volumes relative to age was modeled in all three clinical groups.
Results
In aMCI-P the change in pre to post index rate (i.e. acceleration) of ventricular expansion was 1.7 cm3/yr, and acceleration in brain shrinkage was 5.3 cm3/yr. Brain volume declined and ventricular volume increased in all three groups with age. Volume changes decelerated with increasing age in aMCI-P, and to a lesser extent aMCI-S, but were linear in the matched CN. Among all aMCI subjects, rates of atrophy were greater in apolipoprotein E ε4 carriers than non-carriers.
Conclusions
Rates of atrophy accelerate as individuals progress from aMCI to typical late onset AD. Rates of atrophy are greater in younger than older aMCI-P and aMCI-S subjects. We did not find that atrophy rates varied with age in 70 – 90 year old CN subjects.
doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000281688.77598.35
PMCID: PMC2734477  PMID: 18032747
6.  11C PiB and Structural MRI Provide Complementary Information in Imaging of AD and Amnestic MCI 
Brain : a journal of neurology  2008;131(Pt 3):665-680.
Summary
Twenty cognitively normal (CN), 17 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 8 subjects with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) were imaged with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the amyloid labeling ligand 11C Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB). PiB retention was quantified as the ratio of uptake in cortical regions of interest (ROIs) to the uptake in the cerebellar ROI in images acquired 40-60 minute post injection. A global cortical PiB retention summary measure was derived from six cortical ROIs. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to evaluate PiB retention and grey matter loss on a 3D voxel-wise basis.
AD subjects had high global cortical PiB retention and low hippocampal volume; most CN subjects had low PiB retention and high hippocampal volume; and on average aMCI subjects were intermediate on both PiB and hippocampal volume. A target-to-cerebellar ratio of 1.5 was used to designate subjects as high vs. low PiB cortical retention. All AD subjects fell above this ratio as did 6/20 CN subjects and 9/17 MCI subjects, indicating bi-modal PiB retention in CN and aMCI. Interestingly, we found no consistent differences in learning and memory performance between high vs. low PiB CN subjects or high vs. low aMCI subjects.
The SPM/VBM voxel-wise comparisons of AD vs. CN subjects provided complementary information in that clear and meaningful similarities and differences in topographic distribution of amyloid deposition and grey matter loss were shown. The frontal lobes had high PiB retention with little grey matter loss. Anteromedial temporal areas had low PiB retention with significant grey matter loss. Lateral temporoparietal association cortex displayed both significant PiB retention and grey matter loss.
A voxel-wise SPM conjunction analysis of PiB uptake revealed that subjects with high PiB retention (high CN, high aMCI, and AD) shared a common PiB retention topographic pattern regardless of clinical category, and this PiB topographic pattern matched that of amyloid plaque distribution that has been established in autopsy studies of AD.
Both global cortical PiB retention and hippocampal volumes demonstrated significant correlation in the expected direction with cognitive testing performance; however, correlations were stronger with MRI than PiB. Pair-wise inter-group diagnostic separation was significant for all group-wise pairs for both PiB and hippocampal volume with the exception of CN vs. aMCI which was not significant for PiB. PiB and MRI provided complementary information such that clinical diagnostic classification with both, in combination, was superior to either alone.
doi:10.1093/brain/awm336
PMCID: PMC2730157  PMID: 18263627
Alzheimer's disease; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Pittsburgh Compound B; amyloid imaging; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; hippocampus
7.  Serial PIB and MRI in normal, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: implications for sequence of pathological events in Alzheimer's disease 
Brain  2009;132(5):1355-1365.
The purpose of this study was to use serial imaging to gain insight into the sequence of pathologic events in Alzheimer's disease, and the clinical features associated with this sequence. We measured change in amyloid deposition over time using serial 11C Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography and progression of neurodegeneration using serial structural magnetic resonance imaging. We studied 21 healthy cognitively normal subjects, 32 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and 8 with Alzheimer's disease. Subjects were drawn from two sources—ongoing longitudinal registries at Mayo Clinic, and the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). All subjects underwent clinical assessments, MRI and PIB studies at two time points, approximately one year apart. PIB retention was quantified in global cortical to cerebellar ratio units and brain atrophy in units of cm3 by measuring ventricular expansion. The annual change in global PIB retention did not differ by clinical group (P = 0.90), and although small (median 0.042 ratio units/year overall) was greater than zero among all subjects (P < 0.001). Ventricular expansion rates differed by clinical group (P < 0.001) and increased in the following order: cognitively normal (1.3 cm3/year) <  amnestic mild cognitive impairment (2.5 cm3/year) <  Alzheimer's disease (7.7 cm3/year). Among all subjects there was no correlation between PIB change and concurrent change on CDR-SB (r = −0.01, P = 0.97) but some evidence of a weak correlation with MMSE (r =−0.22, P = 0.09). In contrast, greater rates of ventricular expansion were clearly correlated with worsening concurrent change on CDR-SB (r = 0.42, P < 0.01) and MMSE (r =−0.52, P < 0.01). Our data are consistent with a model of typical late onset Alzheimer's disease that has two main features: (i) dissociation between the rate of amyloid deposition and the rate of neurodegeneration late in life, with amyloid deposition proceeding at a constant slow rate while neurodegeneration accelerates and (ii) clinical symptoms are coupled to neurodegeneration not amyloid deposition. Significant plaque deposition occurs prior to clinical decline. The presence of brain amyloidosis alone is not sufficient to produce cognitive decline, rather, the neurodegenerative component of Alzheimer's disease pathology is the direct substrate of cognitive impairment and the rate of cognitive decline is driven by the rate of neurodegeneration. Neurodegeneration (atrophy on MRI) both precedes and parallels cognitive decline. This model implies a complimentary role for MRI and PIB imaging in Alzheimer's disease, with each reflecting one of the major pathologies, amyloid dysmetabolism and neurodegeneration.
doi:10.1093/brain/awp062
PMCID: PMC2677798  PMID: 19339253
Alzheimer's disease; amyloid imaging; magnetic resonance imaging, longitudinal imaging; mild cognitive impairment; Pittsburgh compound B

Results 1-7 (7)