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1.  Sensitivity of revised diagnostic criteria for the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia 
Brain  2011;134(9):2456-2477.
Based on the recent literature and collective experience, an international consortium developed revised guidelines for the diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. The validation process retrospectively reviewed clinical records and compared the sensitivity of proposed and earlier criteria in a multi-site sample of patients with pathologically verified frontotemporal lobar degeneration. According to the revised criteria, ‘possible’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia requires three of six clinically discriminating features (disinhibition, apathy/inertia, loss of sympathy/empathy, perseverative/compulsive behaviours, hyperorality and dysexecutive neuropsychological profile). ‘Probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia adds functional disability and characteristic neuroimaging, while behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia ‘with definite frontotemporal lobar degeneration’ requires histopathological confirmation or a pathogenic mutation. Sixteen brain banks contributed cases meeting histopathological criteria for frontotemporal lobar degeneration and a clinical diagnosis of behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or vascular dementia at presentation. Cases with predominant primary progressive aphasia or extra-pyramidal syndromes were excluded. In these autopsy-confirmed cases, an experienced neurologist or psychiatrist ascertained clinical features necessary for making a diagnosis according to previous and proposed criteria at presentation. Of 137 cases where features were available for both proposed and previously established criteria, 118 (86%) met ‘possible’ criteria, and 104 (76%) met criteria for ‘probable’ behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. In contrast, 72 cases (53%) met previously established criteria for the syndrome (P < 0.001 for comparison with ‘possible’ and ‘probable’ criteria). Patients who failed to meet revised criteria were significantly older and most had atypical presentations with marked memory impairment. In conclusion, the revised criteria for behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia improve diagnostic accuracy compared with previously established criteria in a sample with known frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Greater sensitivity of the proposed criteria may reflect the optimized diagnostic features, less restrictive exclusion features and a flexible structure that accommodates different initial clinical presentations. Future studies will be needed to establish the reliability and specificity of these revised diagnostic guidelines.
doi:10.1093/brain/awr179
PMCID: PMC3170532  PMID: 21810890
behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia; diagnostic criteria; frontotemporal lobar degeneration; FTD; pathology
2.  Genetic and Clinical Features of Progranulin-Associated Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration 
Archives of neurology  2011;68(4):488-497.
Objective
To assess the relative frequency of unique mutations and their associated characteristics in 97 individuals with mutations in progranulin (GRN), an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD).
Participants and Design
A 46-site International Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Collaboration was formed to collect cases of FTLD with TAR DNA-binding protein of 43-kDa (TDP-43)–positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). We identified 97 individuals with FTLD-TDP with pathogenic GRN mutations (GRN+ FTLD-TDP), assessed their genetic and clinical characteristics, and compared them with 453 patients with FTLD-TDP in which GRN mutations were excluded (GRN− FTLD-TDP). No patients were known to be related. Neuropathologic characteristics were confirmed as FTLD-TDP in 79 of the 97 GRN+ FTLDTDP cases and all of the GRN− FTLD-TDP cases.
Results
Age at onset of FTLD was younger in patients with GRN+ FTLD-TDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (median, 58.0 vs 61.0 years; P<.001), as was age at death (median, 65.5 vs 69.0 years; P<.001). Concomitant motor neuron disease was much less common in GRN+ FTLDTDP vs GRN− FTLD-TDP (5.4% vs 26.3%; P<.001). Fifty different GRN mutations were observed, including 2 novel mutations: c.139delG (p.D47TfsX7) and c.378C>A (p.C126X). The 2 most common GRN mutations were c.1477C>T (p.R493X, found in 18 patients, representing 18.6% of GRN cases) and c.26C>A (p.A9D, found in 6 patients, representing 6.2% of cases). Patients with the c.1477C>T mutation shared a haplotype on chromosome 17; clinically, they resembled patients with other GRN mutations. Patients with the c.26C>A mutation appeared to have a younger age at onset of FTLD and at death and more parkinsonian features than those with other GRN mutations.
Conclusion
GRN+ FTLD-TDP differs in key features from GRN− FTLD-TDP.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.53
PMCID: PMC3160280  PMID: 21482928
3.  Common variants at 7p21 are associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions 
Van Deerlin, Vivianna M. | Sleiman, Patrick M. A. | Martinez-Lage, Maria | Chen-Plotkin, Alice | Wang, Li-San | Graff-Radford, Neill R | Dickson, Dennis W. | Rademakers, Rosa | Boeve, Bradley F. | Grossman, Murray | Arnold, Steven E. | Mann, David M.A. | Pickering-Brown, Stuart M. | Seelaar, Harro | Heutink, Peter | van Swieten, John C. | Murrell, Jill R. | Ghetti, Bernardino | Spina, Salvatore | Grafman, Jordan | Hodges, John | Spillantini, Maria Grazia | Gilman, Sid' | Lieberman, Andrew P. | Kaye, Jeffrey A. | Woltjer, Randall L. | Bigio, Eileen H | Mesulam, Marsel | al-Sarraj, Safa | Troakes, Claire | Rosenberg, Roger N. | White, Charles L. | Ferrer, Isidro | Lladó, Albert | Neumann, Manuela | Kretzschmar, Hans A. | Hulette, Christine Marie | Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A. | Miller, Bruce L | Alzualde, Ainhoa | de Munain, Adolfo Lopez | McKee, Ann C. | Gearing, Marla | Levey, Allan I. | Lah, James J. | Hardy, John | Rohrer, Jonathan D. | Lashley, Tammaryn | Mackenzie, Ian R.A. | Feldman, Howard H. | Hamilton, Ronald L. | Dekosky, Steven T. | van der Zee, Julie | Kumar-Singh, Samir | Van Broeckhoven, Christine | Mayeux, Richard | Vonsattel, Jean Paul G. | Troncoso, Juan C. | Kril, Jillian J | Kwok, John B.J. | Halliday, Glenda M. | Bird, Thomas D. | Ince, Paul G. | Shaw, Pamela J. | Cairns, Nigel J. | Morris, John C. | McLean, Catriona Ann | DeCarli, Charles | Ellis, William G. | Freeman, Stefanie H. | Frosch, Matthew P. | Growdon, John H. | Perl, Daniel P. | Sano, Mary | Bennett, David A. | Schneider, Julie A. | Beach, Thomas G. | Reiman, Eric M. | Woodruff, Bryan K. | Cummings, Jeffrey | Vinters, Harry V. | Miller, Carol A. | Chui, Helena C. | Alafuzoff, Irina | Hartikainen, Päivi | Seilhean, Danielle | Galasko, Douglas | Masliah, Eliezer | Cotman, Carl W. | Tuñón, M. Teresa | Martínez, M. Cristina Caballero | Munoz, David G. | Carroll, Steven L. | Marson, Daniel | Riederer, Peter F. | Bogdanovic, Nenad | Schellenberg, Gerard D. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Trojanowski, John Q. | Lee, Virginia M.-Y.
Nature genetics  2010;42(3):234-239.
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second most common cause of presenile dementia. The predominant neuropathology is FTLD with TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) inclusions (FTLD-TDP)1. FTLD-TDP is frequently familial resulting from progranulin (GRN) mutations. We assembled an international collaboration to identify susceptibility loci for FTLD-TDP, using genome-wide association (GWA). We found that FTLD-TDP associates with multiple SNPs mapping to a single linkage disequilibrium (LD) block on 7p21 that contains TMEM106B in a GWA study (GWAS) on 515 FTLD-TDP cases. Three SNPs retained genome-wide significance following Bonferroni correction; top SNP rs1990622 (P=1.08×10−11; odds ratio (OR) minor allele (C) 0.61, 95% CI 0.53-0.71). The association replicated in 89 FTLD-TDP cases (rs1990622; P=2×10−4). TMEM106B variants may confer risk by increasing TMEM106B expression. TMEM106B variants also contribute to genetic risk for FTLD-TDP in patients with GRN mutations. Our data implicate TMEM106B as a strong risk factor for FTLD-TDP suggesting an underlying pathogenic mechanism.
doi:10.1038/ng.536
PMCID: PMC2828525  PMID: 20154673
4.  Survival Profiles of Patients With Frontotemporal Dementia and Motor Neuron Disease 
Archives of neurology  2009;66(11):1359-1364.
Background
Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are neurodegenerative diseases associated with TAR DNA-binding protein 43– and ubiquitin-immunoreactive pathologic lesions.
Objective
To determine whether survival is influenced by symptom of onset in patients with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Design, Setting, and Patients
Retrospective review of patients with both cognitive impairment and motor neuron disease consecutively evaluated at 4 academic medical centers in 2 countries.
Main Outcome Measures
Clinical phenotypes and survival patterns of patients.
Results
A total of 87 patients were identified, including 60 who developed cognitive symptoms first, 19 who developed motor symptoms first, and 8 who had simultaneous onset of cognitive and motor symptoms. Among the 59 deceased patients, we identified 2 distinct subgroups of patients according to survival. Long-term survivors had cognitive onset and delayed emergence of motor symptoms after a long monosymptomatic phase and had significantly longer survival than the typical survivors (mean, 67.5 months vs 28.2 months, respectively; P<.001). Typical survivors can have simultaneous or discrete onset of cognitive and motor symptoms, and the simultaneous-onset patients had shorter survival (mean, 19.2 months) than those with distinct cognitive or motor onset (mean, 28.6 months) (P=.005).
Conclusions
Distinct patterns of survival profiles exist in patients with frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease, and overall survival may depend on the relative timing of the emergence of secondary symptoms.
doi:10.1001/archneurol.2009.253
PMCID: PMC2881327  PMID: 19901167

Results 1-4 (4)