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1.  Anesthesiology Residents-as-Teachers Program: A Pilot Study 
Background
The role of residents as teachers has grown over time. Programs have been established within various specialties to formally develop these skills. Anesthesiology residents are frequently asked to provide supervision for novice learners and have numerous opportunities for teaching skills and clinical decision making. Yet, there are no educational programs described in the literature to train anesthesiology residents to teach novice learners.
Objective
To explore whether a resident-as-teacher program would increase anesthesiology residents' self-reported teaching skills.
Methods
An 8-session interactive Anesthesiology Residents-as-Teachers (ART) Program was developed to emphasize 6 key teaching skills. During a 2-year period, 14 anesthesiology residents attended the ART program. The primary outcome measure was resident self-assessment of their teaching skills across 14 teaching domains, before and 6 months after the ART program. Residents also evaluated the workshops for quality with a 9-item, postworkshop survey. Paired t testing was used for analysis.
Results
Resident self-assessment led to a mean increase in teaching skills of 1.04 in a 5-point Likert scale (P < .001). Residents reported the greatest improvement in writing/using teaching objectives (+1.29, P < .001), teaching at the bedside (+1.57, P  =  .002), and leading case discussions (+1.64, P  =  .001). Residents rated the workshops 4.2 out of 5 (3.9–4.7).
Conclusions
Residents rated their teaching skills as significantly improved in 13 of 14 teaching domains after participation in the ART program. The educational program required few resources and was rated highly by residents.
doi:10.4300/JGME-D-11-00300.1
PMCID: PMC3546586  PMID: 24294434
2.  Relationship Express: A Pilot Program to Teach Anesthesiology Residents Communication Skills 
Background
The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to teach 6 core competencies and to provide evidence of effective standardized training through objective measures. George Washington University's Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine implemented a pilot program to address the interpersonal and communication skill competency. In this program, we aimed to pilot the Relationship Express model, a series of exercises in experiential learning to teach anesthesiology residents to build effective relationships with patients in time-limited circumstances. The purpose of this paper is to describe the application of this model for anesthesiology training.
Methods
A total of 7 first-year clinical anesthesiology residents participated in this pilot study, and 4 residents completed the entire program for analysis purposes. Relationship Express was presented in three 1.5-hour sessions: (1) introduction followed by 2-case, standardized patient pretest with feedback to residents from faculty observers; (2) interpersonal and communication skills didactic workshop with video behavior modeling; and (3) review discussion followed by 2-case, standardized patient posttest and evaluation.
Results
Modified Brookfield comments revealed the following themes: (1) time constraints were realistic compared with clinical practice; (2) admitting errors with patients was difficult; (3) patients were more aware of body language than anticipated; (4) residents liked the group discussions and the video interview; (5) standardized patients were convincing; and (6) residents found the feedback from faculty and standardized patients helpful.
Conclusions
Resident retrospective self-assessment and learning comments confirm the potential value of the Relationship Express model. This program will require further assessment and refinement with a larger number of residents.
doi:10.4300/JGME-D-10-00012.1
PMCID: PMC3010947  PMID: 22132285

Results 1-2 (2)