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1.  The Charcot Foot in Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2011;34(9):2123-2129.
The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity.
doi:10.2337/dc11-0844
PMCID: PMC3161273  PMID: 21868781
2.  Digital Planimetry Results in More Accurate Wound Measurements: A Comparison to Standard Ruler Measurements 
Background
Cutaneous wound measurements are important to track the healing of a wound and direct appropriate therapy. The most commonly used method to calculate wound area is an estimation by multiplying the longest length by the widest width. Other devices can provide an accurate and precise measurement of the true area (TA). This study aim was to compare wound areas calculated by computerized planimetry with standard area estimation by multiplying the longest length by the widest width (l × w).
Methods
We reviewed the wound records of 10 patients with circular or oval wounds and estimated the area with the l × w method. We compared this with the TA obtained by a specialized planimetric camera.
Results
Average wound size was 4.3 cm2 by l × w estimation and 3 cm2 by TA calculation. We found the l × w method overestimated wound area an average of 41%.
Conclusions
Standard, manual (l × w) measurement of cutaneous wounds inaccurately overestimates wound area by roughly 40%.
PMCID: PMC2909508  PMID: 20663440
planimetry; Silhouette; ulcer; wound measurement
3.  FaceTime for Physicians: Using Real Time Mobile Phone–Based Videoconferencing to Augment Diagnosis and Care in Telemedicine 
Eplasty  2011;11:e23.
Objective/Background: Telemedicine has, even in its infancy, had an impact on the provision of healthcare, particularly in rural communities. However, this often relies on an expensive and ponderous infrastructure that reduces the rapid use and spontaneity for consultations. Methods: Using postoperative and intraoperative examples, we describe the use of one rapid and widely available technology (iPhone FaceTime, Cupertino, California). Results: The device, in allowing “one button connection” similar to making a phone call, reduced the need for preplanning that is generally required for real-time telemedicine consultation. Conclusions: The ability to communicate quickly with something that is an afterthought has the potential to alter how we work with our colleagues and patients. Just as with the iPod in music and the laptop in computing, it is not the change in technology, but the change in form factor and ubiquity that alters this landscape.
PMCID: PMC3087505  PMID: 21559249

Results 1-3 (3)