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1.  Efficient whole-genome association mapping using local phylogenies for unphased genotype data 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(19):2215-2221.
Motivation: Recent advances in genotyping technology has made data acquisition for whole-genome association study cost effective, and a current active area of research is developing efficient methods to analyze such large-scale datasets. Most sophisticated association mapping methods that are currently available take phased haplotype data as input. However, phase information is not readily available from sequencing methods and inferring the phase via computational approaches is time-consuming, taking days to phase a single chromosome.
Results: In this article, we devise an efficient method for scanning unphased whole-genome data for association. Our approach combines a recently found linear-time algorithm for phasing genotypes on trees with a recently proposed tree-based method for association mapping. From unphased genotype data, our algorithm builds local phylogenies along the genome, and scores each tree according to the clustering of cases and controls. We assess the performance of our new method on both simulated and real biological datasets.
Availability The software described in this article is available at http://www.daimi.au.dk/~mailund/Blossoc and distributed under the GNU General Public License.
Contact:mailund@birc.au.dk
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn406
PMCID: PMC2553438  PMID: 18667442
2.  iFoldRNA: three-dimensional RNA structure prediction and folding 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(17):1951-1952.
Summary: Three-dimensional RNA structure prediction and folding is of significant interest in the biological research community. Here, we present iFoldRNA, a novel web-based methodology for RNA structure prediction with near atomic resolution accuracy and analysis of RNA folding thermodynamics. iFoldRNA rapidly explores RNA conformations using discrete molecular dynamics simulations of input RNA sequences. Starting from simplified linear-chain conformations, RNA molecules (<50 nt) fold to native-like structures within half an hour of simulation, facilitating rapid RNA structure prediction. All-atom reconstruction of energetically stable conformations generates iFoldRNA predicted RNA structures. The predicted RNA structures are within 2–5 Å root mean squre deviations (RMSDs) from corresponding experimentally derived structures. RNA folding parameters including specific heat, contact maps, simulation trajectories, gyration radii, RMSDs from native state, fraction of native-like contacts are accessible from iFoldRNA. We expect iFoldRNA will serve as a useful resource for RNA structure prediction and folding thermodynamic analyses.
Availability: http://iFoldRNA.dokhlab.org.
Contact: dokh@med.unc.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn328
PMCID: PMC2559968  PMID: 18579566
3.  Systematic biological prioritization after a genome-wide association study: an application to nicotine dependence 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(16):1805-1811.
Motivation: A challenging problem after a genome-wide association study (GWAS) is to balance the statistical evidence of genotype–phenotype correlation with a priori evidence of biological relevance.
Results: We introduce a method for systematically prioritizing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for further study after a GWAS. The method combines evidence across multiple domains including statistical evidence of genotype–phenotype correlation, known pathways in the pathologic development of disease, SNP/gene functional properties, comparative genomics, prior evidence of genetic linkage, and linkage disequilibrium. We apply this method to a GWAS of nicotine dependence, and use simulated data to test it on several commercial SNP microarrays.
Availability: A comprehensive database of biological prioritization scores for all known SNPs is available at http://zork.wustl.edu/gin. This can be used to prioritize nicotine dependence association studies through a straightforward mathematical formula—no special software is necessary.
Contact: ssaccone@wustl.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn315
PMCID: PMC2610477  PMID: 18565990
4.  Comprehensive in silico mutagenesis highlights functionally important residues in proteins 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(16):i207-i212.
Motivation: Mutating residues into alanine (alanine scanning) is one of the fastest experimental means of probing hypotheses about protein function. Alanine scans can reveal functional hot spots, i.e. residues that alter function upon mutation. In vitro mutagenesis is cumbersome and costly: probing all residues in a protein is typically as impossible as substituting by all non-native amino acids. In contrast, such exhaustive mutagenesis is feasible in silico.
Results: Previously, we developed SNAP to predict functional changes due to non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here, we applied SNAP to all experimental mutations in the ASEdb database of alanine scans; we identified 70% of the hot spots (≥1 kCal/mol change in binding energy); more severe changes were predicted more accurately. Encouraged, we carried out a complete all-against-all in silico mutagenesis for human glucokinase. Many of the residues predicted as functionally important have indeed been confirmed in the literature, others await experimental verification, and our method is ready to aid in the design of in vitro mutagenesis.
Availability: ASEdb and glucokinase scores are available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/SNAP. For submissions of large/whole proteins for processing please contact the author.
Contact: yb2009@columbia.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn268
PMCID: PMC2597370  PMID: 18689826
5.  Systematic biological prioritization after a genome-wide association study 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(16):1805-1811.
Motivation
A challenging problem after a genome-wide association study (GWAS) is to balance the statistical evidence of geno-type-phenotype correlation with a priori evidence of biological relevance.
Results
We introduce a method for systematically prioritizing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for further study after a GWAS. The method combines evidence across multiple domains, including statistical evidence of genotype-phenotype correlation, known pathways in the pathologic development of disease, SNP/gene functional properties, comparative genomics, prior evidence of genetic linkage, and linkage disequilibrium. We apply this method to a GWAS of nicotine dependence, and use simulated data to test it on several commercial SNP microarrays.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn315
PMCID: PMC2610477  PMID: 18565990
6.  LOT: a tool for linkage analysis of ordinal traits for pedigree data 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(15):1737-1739.
Summary: Existing linkage-analysis methods address binary or quantitative traits. However, many complex diseases and human conditions, particularly behavioral disorders, are rated on ordinal scales. Herein, we introduce, LOT, a tool that performs linkage analysis of ordinal traits for pedigree data. It implements a latent-variable proportional-odds logistic model that relates inheritance patterns to the distribution of the ordinal trait. The likelihood-ratio test is used for testing evidence of linkage.
Availability: The LOT program is available for download at http://c2s2.yale.edu/software/LOT/
Contact: heping.zhang@yale.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn258
PMCID: PMC2566542  PMID: 18535081
7.  Memory-efficient dynamic programming backtrace and pairwise local sequence alignment 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(16):1772-1778.
Motivation
A backtrace through a dynamic programming algorithm’s intermediate results in search of an optimal path, or to sample paths according to an implied probability distribution, or as the second stage of a forward–backward algorithm, is a task of fundamental importance in computational biology. When there is insufficient space to store all intermediate results in high-speed memory (e.g. cache) existing approaches store selected stages of the computation, and recompute missing values from these checkpoints on an as-needed basis.
Results
Here we present an optimal checkpointing strategy, and demonstrate its utility with pairwise local sequence alignment of sequences of length 10 000.
Availability
Sample C++-code for optimal backtrace is available in the Supplementary Materials.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn308
PMCID: PMC2668612  PMID: 18558620
8.  Modeling peptide fragmentation with dynamic Bayesian networks for peptide identification 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(13):i348-i356.
Motivation
Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is an indispensable technology for identification of proteins from complex mixtures. Proteins are digested to peptides that are then identified by their fragmentation patterns in the mass spectrometer. Thus, at its core, MS/MS protein identification relies on the relative predictability of peptide fragmentation. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is complex and not fully understood, and what is understood is not always exploited by peptide identification algorithms.
Results
We use a hybrid dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)/support vector machine (SVM) approach to address these two problems. We train a set of DBNs on high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches. These DBNs, known collectively as Riptide, comprise a probabilistic model of peptide fragmentation chemistry. Examination of the distributions learned by Riptide allows identification of new trends, such as prevalent a-ion fragmentation at peptide cleavage sites C-term to hydrophobic residues. In addition, Riptide can be used to produce likelihood scores that indicate whether a given peptide-spectrum match is correct. A vector of such scores is evaluated by an SVM, which produces a final score to be used in peptide identification. Using Riptide in this way yields improved discrimination when compared to other state-of-the-art MS/MS identification algorithms, increasing the number of positive identifications by as much as 12% at a 1% false discovery rate.
Availability
Python and C source code are available upon request from the authors. The curated training sets are available at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/intense/. The Graphical Model Tool Kit (GMTK) is freely available at http://ssli.ee.washington.edu/bilmes/gmtk.
Contact
noble@gs.washington.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn189
PMCID: PMC2665034  PMID: 18586734
9.  Comprehensive in silico mutagenesis highlights functionally important residues in proteins 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(16):i207-i212.
Motivation
Mutating residues into alanine (alanine scanning) is one of the fastest experimental means of probing hypotheses about protein function. Alanine scans can reveal functional hot spots, i.e. residues that alter function upon mutation. In vitro mutagenesis is cumbersome and costly: probing all residues in a protein is typically as impossible as substituting by all non-native amino acids. In contrast, such exhaustive mutagenesis is feasible in silico.
Results
Previously, we developed SNAP to predict functional changes due to non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here, we applied SNAP to all experimental mutations in the ASEdb database of alanine scans; we identified 70% of the hot spots (≥1kCal/mol change in binding energy); more severe changes were predicted more accurately. Encouraged, we carried out a complete all-against-all in silico mutagenesis for human glucokinase. Many of the residues predicted as functionally important have indeed been confirmed in the literature, others await experimental verification, and our method is ready to aid in the design of in vitro mutagenesis.
Availability
ASEdb and glucokinase scores are available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/SNAP. For submissions of large/whole proteins for processing please contact the author.
Contact: yb2009@columbia.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn268
PMCID: PMC2597370  PMID: 18689826
10.  Powerful fusion: PSI-BLAST and consensus sequences 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(18):1987-1993.
Motivation
A typical PSI-BLAST search consists of iterative scanning and alignment of a large sequence database during which a scoring profile is progressively built and refined. Such a profile can also be stored and used to search against a different database of sequences. Using it to search against a database of consensus rather than native sequences is a simple add-on that boosts performance surprisingly well. The improvement comes at a price: we hypothesized that random alignment score statistics would differ between native and consensus sequences. Thus PSI-BLAST-based profile searches against consensus sequences might incorrectly estimate statistical significance of alignment scores. In addition, iterative searches against consensus databases may fail. Here, we addressed these challenges in an attempt to harness the full power of the combination of PSI-BLAST and consensus sequences.
Results
We studied alignment score statistics for various types of consensus sequences. In general, the score distribution parameters of profile-based consensus sequence alignments differed significantly from those derived for the native sequences. PSI-BLAST partially compensated for the parameter variation. We have identified a protocol for building specialized consensus sequences that significantly improved search sensitivity and preserved score distribution parameters. As a result, PSI-BLAST profiles can be used to search specialized consensus sequences without sacrificing estimates of statistical significance. We also provided results indicating that iterative PSI-BLAST searches against consensus sequences could work very well. Overall, we showed how a widely popular and effective method could be used to identify significantly more relevant similarities among protein sequences.
Availability
http://www.rostlab.org/services/consensus/
Contact:
dsp23@columbia.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn384
PMCID: PMC2577777  PMID: 18678588
11.  Efficient Whole-Genome Association Mapping using Local Phylogenies for Unphased Genotype Data 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(19):2215-2221.
Motivation
Recent advances in genotyping technology has made data acquisition for whole-genome association study cost effective, and a current active area of research is developing efficient methods to analyze such large-scale data sets. Most sophisticated association mapping methods that are currently available take phased haplotype data as input. However, phase information is not readily available from sequencing methods and inferring the phase via computational approaches is time-consuming, taking days to phase a single chromosome.
Results
In this paper, we devise an efficient method for scanning unphased whole-genome data for association. Our approach combines a recently found linear-time algorithm for phasing genotypes on trees with a recently proposed tree-based method for association mapping. From unphased genotype data, our algorithm builds local phylogenies along the genome, and scores each tree according to the clustering of cases and controls. We assess the performance of our new method on both simulated and real biological data sets.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn406
PMCID: PMC2553438  PMID: 18667442
12.  LOT 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(15):1737-1739.
Summary
Existing linkage-analysis methods address binary or quantitative traits. However, many complex diseases and human conditions, particularly behavioral disorders, are rated on ordinal scales. Herein, we introduce, LOT, a tool that performs linkage analysis of ordinal traits for pedigree data. It implements a latent-variable proportional-odds logistic model that relates inheritance patterns to the distribution of the ordinal trait. The likelihood-ratio test is used for testing evidence of linkage.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn258
PMCID: PMC2566542  PMID: 18535081
13.  iFoldRNA: Three-dimensional RNA Structure Prediction and Folding 
Bioinformatics (Oxford, England)  2008;24(17):1951-1952.
Summary
Three-dimensional RNA structure prediction and folding is of significant interest in the biological research community. Here, we present iFoldRNA, a novel web-based methodology for RNA structure prediction with near atomic resolution accuracy and analysis of RNA folding thermodynamics. iFoldRNA rapidly explores RNA conformations using discrete molecular dynamics simulations of input RNA sequences. Starting from simplified linear-chain conformations, RNA molecules (<50 nucleotides) fold to native-like structures within half an hour of simulation, facilitating rapid RNA structure prediction. All-atom reconstruction of energetically stable conformations generates iFoldRNA predicted RNA structures. The predicted RNA structures are within 2–5 Angstrom root mean square deviations from corresponding experimentally derived structures. RNA folding parameters including specific heat, contact maps, simulation trajectories, gyration radii, root mean square deviations from native state, fraction of native-like contacts are accessible from iFoldRNA. We expect iFoldRNA will serve as a useful resource for RNA structure prediction and folding thermodynamic analyses.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn328
PMCID: PMC2559968  PMID: 18579566
14.  Powerful fusion: PSI-BLAST and consensus sequences 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(18):1987-1993.
Motivation: A typical PSI-BLAST search consists of iterative scanning and alignment of a large sequence database during which a scoring profile is progressively built and refined. Such a profile can also be stored and used to search against a different database of sequences. Using it to search against a database of consensus rather than native sequences is a simple add-on that boosts performance surprisingly well. The improvement comes at a price: we hypothesized that random alignment score statistics would differ between native and consensus sequences. Thus PSI-BLAST-based profile searches against consensus sequences might incorrectly estimate statistical significance of alignment scores. In addition, iterative searches against consensus databases may fail. Here, we addressed these challenges in an attempt to harness the full power of the combination of PSI-BLAST and consensus sequences.
Results: We studied alignment score statistics for various types of consensus sequences. In general, the score distribution parameters of profile-based consensus sequence alignments differed significantly from those derived for the native sequences. PSI-BLAST partially compensated for the parameter variation. We have identified a protocol for building specialized consensus sequences that significantly improved search sensitivity and preserved score distribution parameters. As a result, PSI-BLAST profiles can be used to search specialized consensus sequences without sacrificing estimates of statistical significance. We also provided results indicating that iterative PSI-BLAST searches against consensus sequences could work very well. Overall, we showed how a very popular and effective method could be used to identify significantly more relevant similarities among protein sequences.
Availability: http://www.rostlab.org/services/consensus/
Contact: dariusz@mit.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn384
PMCID: PMC2577777  PMID: 18678588
15.  Modeling peptide fragmentation with dynamic Bayesian networks for peptide identification 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(13):i348-i356.
Motivation: Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is an indispensable technology for identification of proteins from complex mixtures. Proteins are digested to peptides that are then identified by their fragmentation patterns in the mass spectrometer. Thus, at its core, MS/MS protein identification relies on the relative predictability of peptide fragmentation. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is complex and not fully understood, and what is understood is not always exploited by peptide identification algorithms.
Results: We use a hybrid dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)/support vector machine (SVM) approach to address these two problems. We train a set of DBNs on high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches. These DBNs, known collectively as Riptide, comprise a probabilistic model of peptide fragmentation chemistry. Examination of the distributions learned by Riptide allows identification of new trends, such as prevalent a-ion fragmentation at peptide cleavage sites C-term to hydrophobic residues. In addition, Riptide can be used to produce likelihood scores that indicate whether a given peptide-spectrum match is correct. A vector of such scores is evaluated by an SVM, which produces a final score to be used in peptide identification. Using Riptide in this way yields improved discrimination when compared to other state-of-the-art MS/MS identification algorithms, increasing the number of positive identifications by as much as 12% at a 1% false discovery rate.
Availability: Python and C source code are available upon request from the authors. The curated training sets are available at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/intense/. The Graphical Model Tool Kit (GMTK) is freely available at http://ssli.ee.washington.edu/bilmes/gmtk.
Contact:noble@gs.washington.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn189
PMCID: PMC2665034  PMID: 18586734
16.  Memory-efficient dynamic programming backtrace and pairwise local sequence alignment 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(16):1772-1778.
Motivation: A backtrace through a dynamic programming algorithm's intermediate results in search of an optimal path, or to sample paths according to an implied probability distribution, or as the second stage of a forward–backward algorithm, is a task of fundamental importance in computational biology. When there is insufficient space to store all intermediate results in high-speed memory (e.g. cache) existing approaches store selected stages of the computation, and recompute missing values from these checkpoints on an as-needed basis.
Results: Here we present an optimal checkpointing strategy, and demonstrate its utility with pairwise local sequence alignment of sequences of length 10 000.
Availability: Sample C++-code for optimal backtrace is available in the Supplementary Materials.
Contact: leen@cs.rpi.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn308
PMCID: PMC2668612  PMID: 18558620
18.  Promoter-proximal CCCTC-factor binding is associated with an increase in the transcriptional pausing index 
Bioinformatics  2012;29(12):1485-1487.
Motivation: It has been known for more than 2 decades that after RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) initiates transcription, it can enter into a paused or stalled state immediately downstream of the transcription start site before productive elongation. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic technologies facilitated the discovery that RNAPII pausing at promoters is a widespread physiologically regulated phenomenon. The molecular underpinnings of pausing are incompletely understood. The CCCTC-factor (CTCF) is a ubiquitous nuclear factor that has diverse regulatory functions, including a recently discovered role in promoting RNAPII pausing at splice sites.
Results: In this study, we analyzed CTCF binding sites and nascent transcriptomic data from three different cell types, and found that promoter-proximal CTCF binding is significantly associated with RNAPII pausing.
Contact: praveen_sethupathy@med.unc.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts596
PMCID: PMC3673211  PMID: 23047559
19.  Exome-based analysis for RNA epigenome sequencing data 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1565-1567.
Motivation: Fragmented RNA immunoprecipitation combined with RNA sequencing enabled the unbiased study of RNA epigenome at a near single-base resolution; however, unique features of this new type of data call for novel computational techniques.
Result: Through examining the connections of RNA epigenome sequencing data with two well-studied data types, ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq, we unveiled the salient characteristics of this new data type. The computational strategies were discussed accordingly, and a novel data processing pipeline was proposed that combines several existing tools with a newly developed exome-based approach ‘exomePeak’ for detecting, representing and visualizing the post-transcriptional RNA modification sites on the transcriptome.
Availability: The MATLAB package ‘exomePeak’ and additional details are available at http://compgenomics.utsa.edu/exomePeak/.
Contact: yufei.huang@utsa.edu or jmeng@mit.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt171
PMCID: PMC3673212  PMID: 23589649
20.  An HMM-based algorithm for evaluating rates of receptor–ligand binding kinetics from thermal fluctuation data 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1511-1518.
Motivation: Abrupt reduction/resumption of thermal fluctuations of a force probe has been used to identify association/dissociation events of protein–ligand bonds. We show that off-rate of molecular dissociation can be estimated by the analysis of the bond lifetime, while the on-rate of molecular association can be estimated by the analysis of the waiting time between two neighboring bond events. However, the analysis relies heavily on subjective judgments and is time-consuming. To automate the process of mapping out bond events from thermal fluctuation data, we develop a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based method.
Results: The HMM method represents the bond state by a hidden variable with two values: bound and unbound. The bond association/dissociation is visualized and pinpointed. We apply the method to analyze a key receptor–ligand interaction in the early stage of hemostasis and thrombosis: the von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding to platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα). The numbers of bond lifetime and waiting time events estimated by the HMM are much more than those estimated by a descriptive statistical method from the same set of raw data. The kinetic parameters estimated by the HMM are in excellent agreement with those by a descriptive statistical analysis, but have much smaller errors for both wild-type and two mutant VWF-A1 domains. Thus, the computerized analysis allows us to speed up the analysis and improve the quality of estimates of receptor–ligand binding kinetics.
Contact: jeffwu@isye.gatech.edu or cheng.zhu@bme.gatech.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt180
PMCID: PMC3673216  PMID: 23599504
21.  INstruct: a database of high-quality 3D structurally resolved protein interactome networks 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1577-1579.
Summary: INstruct is a database of high-quality, 3D, structurally resolved protein interactome networks in human and six model organisms. INstruct combines the scale of available high-quality binary protein interaction data with the specificity of atomic-resolution structural information derived from co-crystal evidence using a tested interaction interface inference method. Its web interface is designed to allow for flexible search based on standard and organism-specific protein and gene-naming conventions, visualization of protein architecture highlighting interaction interfaces and viewing and downloading custom 3D structurally resolved interactome datasets.
Availability: INstruct is freely available on the web at http://instruct.yulab.org with all major browsers supported.
Contact: haiyuan.yu@cornell.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt181
PMCID: PMC3673217  PMID: 23599502
22.  Shimmer: detection of genetic alterations in tumors using next-generation sequence data 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1498-1503.
Motivation: Extensive DNA sequencing of tumor and matched normal samples using exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies has enabled the discovery of recurrent genetic alterations in cancer cells, but variability in stromal contamination and subclonal heterogeneity still present a severe challenge to available detection algorithms.
Results: Here, we describe publicly available software, Shimmer, which accurately detects somatic single-nucleotide variants using statistical hypothesis testing with multiple testing correction. This program produces somatic single-nucleotide variant predictions with significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than other available software when run on highly contaminated or heterogeneous samples, and it gives comparable sensitivity and accuracy when run on samples of high purity.
Availability: http://www.github.com/nhansen/Shimmer
Contact: nhansen@mail.nih.gov
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt183
PMCID: PMC3673219  PMID: 23620360
23.  A multi-layer inference approach to reconstruct condition-specific genes and their regulation 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1541-1552.
An important topic in systems biology is the reverse engineering of regulatory mechanisms through reconstruction of context-dependent gene networks. A major challenge is to identify the genes and the regulations specific to a condition or phenotype, given that regulatory processes are highly connected such that a specific response is typically accompanied by numerous collateral effects. In this study, we design a multi-layer approach that is able to reconstruct condition-specific genes and their regulation through an integrative analysis of large-scale information of gene expression, protein interaction and transcriptional regulation (transcription factor-target gene relationships). We establish the accuracy of our methodology against synthetic datasets, as well as a yeast dataset. We then extend the framework to the application of higher eukaryotic systems, including human breast cancer and Arabidopsis thaliana cold acclimation. Our study identified TACSTD2 (TROP2) as a target gene for human breast cancer and discovered its regulation by transcription factors CREB, as well as NFkB. We also predict KIF2C is a target gene for ER−/HER2− breast cancer and is positively regulated by E2F1. The predictions were further confirmed through experimental studies.
Availability: The implementation and detailed protocol of the layer approach is available at http://www.egr.msu.edu/changroup/Protocols/Three-layer%20approach%20to%20reconstruct%20condition.html.
Contact: krischan@egr.msu.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt186
PMCID: PMC3673221  PMID: 23610368
24.  Mendel: the Swiss army knife of genetic analysis programs 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1568-1570.
Summary: Mendel is one of the few statistical genetics packages that provide a full spectrum of gene mapping methods, ranging from parametric linkage in large pedigrees to genome-wide association with rare variants. Our latest additions to Mendel anticipate and respond to the needs of the genetics community. Compared with earlier versions, Mendel is faster and easier to use and has a wider range of applications. Supported platforms include Linux, MacOS and Windows.
Availability: Free from www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/mendel
Contact: klange@ucla.edu
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt187
PMCID: PMC3673222  PMID: 23610370
25.  Using association rule mining to determine promising secondary phenotyping hypotheses 
Bioinformatics  2014;30(12):i52-i59.
Motivation: Large-scale phenotyping projects such as the Sanger Mouse Genetics project are ongoing efforts to help identify the influences of genes and their modification on phenotypes. Gene–phenotype relations are crucial to the improvement of our understanding of human heritable diseases as well as the development of drugs. However, given that there are ∼20 000 genes in higher vertebrate genomes and the experimental verification of gene–phenotype relations requires a lot of resources, methods are needed that determine good candidates for testing.
Results: In this study, we applied an association rule mining approach to the identification of promising secondary phenotype candidates. The predictions rely on a large gene–phenotype annotation set that is used to find occurrence patterns of phenotypes. Applying an association rule mining approach, we could identify 1967 secondary phenotype hypotheses that cover 244 genes and 136 phenotypes. Using two automated and one manual evaluation strategies, we demonstrate that the secondary phenotype candidates possess biological relevance to the genes they are predicted for. From the results we conclude that the predicted secondary phenotypes constitute good candidates to be experimentally tested and confirmed.
Availability: The secondary phenotype candidates can be browsed through at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/databases/phenodigm/gene/secondaryphenotype/list.
Contact: ao5@sanger.ac.uk or ds5@sanger.ac.uk
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu260
PMCID: PMC4059059  PMID: 24932005

Results 1-25 (2081)