PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (5585)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
more »
1.  Severe influenza cases in paediatric intensive care units in Germany during the pre-pandemic seasons 2005 to 2008 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2011;11:233.
Background
Data on complications in children with seasonal influenza virus infection are limited. We initiated a nation-wide three-year surveillance of children who were admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with severe seasonal influenza.
Methods
From October 2005 to July 2008, active surveillance was performed using an established reporting system for rare diseases (ESPED) including all paediatric hospitals in Germany. Cases to be reported were hospitalized children < 17 years of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza treated in a PICU or dying in hospital.
Results
Twenty severe influenza-associated cases were reported from 14 PICUs during three pre-pandemic influenza seasons (2005-2008). The median age of the patients (12 males/8 females) was 7.5 years (range 0.1-15 years). None had received vaccination against influenza. In 14 (70%) patients, the infection had been caused by influenza A and in five (25%) by influenza B; in one child (5%) the influenza type was not reported. Patients spent a median of 19 (IQR 12-38) days in the hospital and a median of 11 days (IQR 6-18 days) in the PICU; 10 (50%) needed mechanical ventilation. Most frequent diagnoses were influenza-associated pneumonia (60%), bronchitis/bronchiolitis (30%), encephalitis/encephalopathy (25%), secondary bacterial pneumonia (25%), and ARDS (25%). Eleven (55%) children had chronic underlying medical conditions, including 8 (40%) with chronic pulmonary diseases. Two influenza A- associated deaths were reported: i) an 8-year old boy with pneumococcal encephalopathy following influenza infection died from cerebral edema, ii) a 14-year-old boy with asthma bronchiale, cardiac malformation and Addison's disease died from cardiac and respiratory failure. For nine (45%) patients, possibly permanent sequelae were reported (3 neurological, 3 pulmonary, 3 other sequelae).
Conclusions
Influenza-associated pneumonia and secondary bacterial infections are relevant complications of seasonal influenza in Germany. The incidence of severe influenza cases in PICUs was relatively low. This may be either due to the weak to moderate seasonal influenza activity during the years 2005 to 2008 or due to under-diagnosis of influenza by physicians. Fifty% of the observed severe cases might have been prevented by following the recommendations for vaccination of risk groups in Germany.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-11-233
PMCID: PMC3175218  PMID: 21880125
2.  Antimicrobial resistance predicts death in Tanzanian children with bloodstream infections: a prospective cohort study 
Background
Bloodstream infection is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity and death in children. The impact of antimicrobial resistance and HIV infection on outcome is not firmly established.
Methods
We assessed the incidence of bloodstream infection and risk factors for fatal outcome in a prospective cohort study of 1828 consecutive admissions of children aged zero to seven years with signs of systemic infection. Blood was obtained for culture, malaria microscopy, HIV antibody test and, when necessary, HIV PCR. We recorded data on clinical features, underlying diseases, antimicrobial drug use and patients' outcome.
Results
The incidence of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection was 13.9% (255/1828) of admissions, despite two thirds of the study population having received antimicrobial therapy prior to blood culture. The most frequent isolates were klebsiella, salmonellae, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, 21.6% had malaria and 16.8% HIV infection. One third (34.9%) of the children with laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection died. The mortality rate from Gram-negative bloodstream infection (43.5%) was more than double that of malaria (20.2%) and Gram-positive bloodstream infection (16.7%). Significant risk factors for death by logistic regression modeling were inappropriate treatment due to antimicrobial resistance, HIV infection, other underlying infectious diseases, malnutrition and bloodstream infection caused by Enterobacteriaceae, other Gram-negatives and candida.
Conclusion
Bloodstream infection was less common than malaria, but caused more deaths. The frequent use of antimicrobials prior to blood culture may have hampered the detection of organisms susceptible to commonly used antimicrobials, including pneumococci, and thus the study probably underestimates the incidence of bloodstream infection. The finding that antimicrobial resistance, HIV-infection and malnutrition predict fatal outcome calls for renewed efforts to curb the further emergence of resistance, improve HIV care and nutrition for children.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-7-43
PMCID: PMC1891109  PMID: 17519011
3.  Predictors of mortality among TB-HIV Co-infected patients being treated for tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2013;13:297.
Background
Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality in high HIV-prevalence populations. HIV is driving the TB epidemic in many countries, especially those in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to assess predictors of mortality among TB-HIV co-infected patients being treated for TB in Northwest Ethiopia.
Methods
An institution-based retrospective cohort study was conducted between April, 2009 and January, 2012. Based on TB, antiretroviral therapy (ART), and pre-ART registration records, TB-HIV co-infected patients were categorized into “On ART” and “Non-ART” cohorts. A Chi-square test and a T-test were used to compare categorical and continuous variables between the two groups, respectively. A Kaplan-Meier test was used to estimate the probability of death after TB diagnosis. A log-rank test was used to compare overall mortality between the two groups. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine factors associated with death after TB diagnosis.
Results
A total of 422 TB-HIV co-infected patients (i.e., 272 On ART and 150 Non-ART patients) were included for a median of 197 days. The inter-quartile range (IQR) for On ART patients was 140 to 221 days and the IQR for Non-ART patients was 65.5 to 209.5 days. In the Non-ART cohort, more TB-HIV co-infected patients died during TB treatment: 44 (29.3%) Non-ART patients died, as compared to 49 (18%) On ART patients died. Independent predictors of mortality during TB treatment included: receiving ART (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR) =0.35 [0.19-0.64]); not having initiated cotrimoxazole prophylactic therapy (CPT) (AHR = 3.03 [1.58-5.79]); being ambulatory (AHR = 2.10 [1.22-3.62]); CD4 counts category being 0-75cells/micro liter, 75-150cells/micro liter, or 150-250cells/micro liter (AHR = 4.83 [1.98-11.77], 3.57 [1.48-8.61], and 3.07 [1.33-7.07], respectively); and treatment in a hospital (AHR = 2.64 [1.51-4.62]).
Conclusions
Despite the availability of free ART from health institutions in Northwest Ethiopia, mortality was high among TB-HIV co-infected patients, and strongly associated with the absence of ART during TB treatment. In addition cotrimoxazol prophylactic therapy remained important factor in reduction of mortality during TB treatment. The study also noted importance of early ART even at higher CD4 counts.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-297
PMCID: PMC3703293  PMID: 23815342
Predictors; Mortality; TB-HIV; Co-infection
4.  Childhood TB epidemiology and treatment outcomes in Thailand: a TB active surveillance network, 2004 to 2006 
Background
Of the 9.2 million new TB cases occurring each year, about 10% are in children. Because childhood TB is usually non-infectious and non-fatal, national programs do not prioritize childhood TB diagnosis and treatment. We reviewed data from a demonstration project to learn more about the epidemiology of childhood TB in Thailand.
Methods
In four Thai provinces and one national hospital, we contacted healthcare facilities monthly to record data about persons diagnosed with TB, assist with patient care, provide HIV counseling and testing, and obtain sputum for culture and susceptibility testing. We analyzed clinical and treatment outcome data for patients age < 15 years old registered in 2005 and 2006.
Results
Only 279 (2%) of 14,487 total cases occurred in children. The median age of children was 8 years (range: 4 months, 14 years). Of 197 children with pulmonary TB, 63 (32%) were bacteriologically-confirmed: 56 (28%) were smear-positive and 7 (4%) were smear-negative, but culture-positive. One was diagnosed with multi-drug resistant TB. HIV infection was documented in 75 (27%). Thirteen (17%) of 75 HIV-infected children died during TB treatment compared with 4 (2%) of 204 not known to be HIV-infected (p < 0.01).
Conclusion
Childhood TB is infrequently diagnosed in Thailand. Understanding whether this is due to absence of disease or diagnostic effort requires further research. HIV contributes substantially to the childhood TB burden in Thailand and is associated with high mortality.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-8-94
PMCID: PMC2483984  PMID: 18637205
5.  Characterising the aetiology of severe acute gastroenteritis among patients visiting a hospital in Qatar using real-time polymerase chain reaction 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2013;13:329.
Background
Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) remains a common cause of clinic visits and hospitalizations, though its aetiology has not been determined in Qatar.
Methods
We performed a prospective, emergency department–based study of 288 children and adults with AGE. Stool specimens were collected at presentation from June to November 2009. Faecal specimens were tested, using real-time PCR, for a panel of four viral (norovirus, adenovirus, astrovirus and rotavirus) and bacterial pathogens.
Results
Viral and bacterial pathogens were detected in 131 (45.5%) and 34 (12.2%) of the 288 patients recruited. The most commonly detected pathogens were norovirus (28.5%), rotavirus (10.4%), followed by adenovirus (6.25%) and astrovirus (0.30%). Norovirus was the most commonly detected viral pathogen amongst all the age groups with an almost even distribution in all age groups. Rotavirus and adenovirus were more common in children under 5 yr of age. Astrovirus was found in only one person.
Conclusions
Viruses, especially noroviruses, are associated with severe diarrhoea in children and adults in Qatar. Further studies to confirm the findings and to explore the causes of illness among patients from whom a pathogen cannot be determined are needed.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-329
PMCID: PMC3734054  PMID: 23865805
Norovirus; Rotavirus; Adenovirus; Astrovirus; Acute gastroenteritis
6.  Nasal carriage of a single clone of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among kindergarten attendees in northern Taiwan 
Background:
To evaluate the prevalence and microbiological characterization of community-acquired (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage in a kindergarten.
Methods:
Point prevalence study. Nasal swabs were collected from healthy children younger than 7 years of age who were attending a kindergarten in Taipei, Taiwan. A parent questionnaire regarding MRSA risk factors was administered simultaneously. All CA-MRSA colonization isolates were archived for subsequent antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing.
Results:
Of the 68 children who participated in the study, 17 (25%) had S. aureus isolated from nasal swabs. Nine (13.2%) of the 68 children had CA-MRSA carriage, and none of them had any identified risk factors. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed all of the 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates had uniformly high resistance (100%) to both clindamycin and erythromycin, the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin-constitutive phenotype and the ermB gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed 8 (88.9%) of 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates were genetically related and multilocus sequence typing revealed all isolates had sequence type 59. All of the colonization isolates carried the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV, but none were positive for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes.
Conclusion:
The results of this study suggest that a single predominant CA-MRSA colonization strain featuring high clindamycin resistance circulated in this kindergarten. Additionally, due to the established transmissibility of colonization isolates, the high prevalence of nasal carriage of CA-MRSA among healthy attendees in kindergartens may indicate the accelerated spread of CA-MRSA in the community.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-7-51
PMCID: PMC1906787  PMID: 17543109
7.  Clinical challenge: fatal mucormycotic osteomyelitis caused by Rhizopus microsporus despite aggressive multimodal treatment 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2014;14:488.
Background
Mucormycosis is an invasive mycotic disease caused by fungi in the zygomycetes class. Although ubiquitous in the environment, zygomycetes are rarely known to cause invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts with a high mortality even under aggressive antifungal and surgical therapy. Clinically, mucormycosis frequently affects the sinus occasionally showing pulmonary or cerebral involvement. However skeletal manifestation with Rhizopus microsporus (RM) osteomyelitis leading to emergency surgical proximal femoral resection with fatal outcome has not been described yet.
Case presentation
We report the case of a 73-year-old male suffering from myelodysplastic syndrome with precedent bone marrow transplantation. Six months after transplantation he consulted our internal medicine department in a septic condition with a four week history of painful swelling of the right hip. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple bone infarcts in both femurs. In the right femoral head, neck and trochanteric region a recent infarct showed massive secondary osteomyelitis, breaking through the medial cortex. Emergency surgical proximal femoral resection was performed due to extensive bone and soft tissue destruction. Microbiological and basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis revealed RM. Amphotericin B and posaconazole treatment with septic revision surgery was performed. However the disease ran a rapid course and was fatal two months after hospital admission.
Conclusion
This alarming result with extensive RM osteomyelitis in the proximal femur of an immunocompromised patient may hopefully warn medical staff to perform early imaging and aggressive surgical supported multimodal treatment in similar cases.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-488
PMCID: PMC4164739  PMID: 25195155
Mucormycosis; Rhizopus microsporus; Fungal osteomyelitis; Immunocompromitation; Radical surgical proximal femoral resection
8.  Fatal meningitis in a previously healthy young adult caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 38: an emerging serotype? 
Background
In December 2001, a fatal case of pneumococcal meningitis in a Marine Corps recruit was identified. As pneumococcal vaccine usage in recruit populations is being considered, an investigation was initiated into the causative serotype.
Case presentation
Traditional and molecular methods were utilized to determine the serotype of the infecting pneumococcus. The pneumococcal isolate was identified as serotype 38 (PS38), a serotype not covered by current vaccine formulations. The global significance of this serotype was explored in the medical literature, and found to be a rare but recognized cause of carriage and invasive disease.
Conclusion
The potential of PS38 to cause severe disease is documented in this report. Current literature does not support the hypothesis that this serotype is increasing in incidence. However, as we monitor the changing epidemiology of pneumococcal illness in the US in this conjugate era, PS38 might find a more prominent and concerning niche as a replacement serotype.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-5-38
PMCID: PMC1156897  PMID: 15943886
9.  Pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis at three teaching hospitals in Japan, 2003–2011: analysis of 14 cases and a review of the literature 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2013;13:525.
Background
Pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) is a rare disease whose clinical characteristics have not been clarified. This study aimed to investigate the clinical features and outcomes of patients with PVO.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated all adult patients diagnosed with PVO at three teaching hospitals in Japan from January 2003 to December 2011. All cases were identified through a review of the medical records of patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD).
Results
Among 208 patients with IPD, we identified 14 with PVO (6.4%; 95% CI, 3.5–10%). All 14 patients (nine male, five female; median age 69 years) had acquired PVO outside the hospital and had no recent history of an invasive procedure or back injury. Five patients (36%) had diabetes mellitus, and four (29%) had heavy alcohol intake. Fever (n = 13; 93%) or back pain/neck pain (n = 12; 86%) were present in most patients. The lumbar spine was affected in nine patients (64%) but the cervical spine was the site of infection in four patients (29%). All patients except one had a positive blood culture for Streptococcus pneumoniae, and there were no distant infected sites in most patients (n = 10; 71%). Intravenous beta-lactam therapy was initiated within 1 week after the onset of symptoms in 11 patients (79%). No patients died within 30 days, but one patient died from aspiration pneumonia on day 37 after admission.
Conclusions
PVO was relatively common among adult patients with IPD, and mortality was low in this study. S. pneumoniae may be the causative pathogen of vertebral osteomyelitis, especially among community-onset cases without a history of invasive procedures or back injury.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-525
PMCID: PMC3833677  PMID: 24209735
Pneumococcal infections; Spinal infections; Spondylodiscitis; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Vertebral osteomyelitis
10.  Patterns of antimicrobial resistance in a surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey 
Background
Several studies have reported higher rates of antimicrobial resistance among isolates from intensive care units than among isolates from general patient-care areas. The aims of this study were to review the pathogens associated with nosocomial infections in a surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey and to summarize rates of antimicrobial resistance in the most common pathogens. The survey was conducted over a period of twelve months in a tertiary-care teaching hospital located in the south-eastern part of Turkey, Gaziantep. A total of 871 clinical specimens from 615 adult patients were collected. From 871 clinical specimens 771 bacterial and fungal isolates were identified.
Results
Most commonly isolated microorganisms were: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.3%), Candida species (15%) and Staphylococcus aureus (12.9%). Among the Gram-negative microorganisms P. aeruginosa were mostly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins (71.3–98.1%), while Acinetobacter baumannii were resistant in all cases to piperacillin, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone. Isolates of S. aureus were mostly resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, and methicillin (82–95%), whereas coagulase-negative staphylococci were 98.6% resistant to methicillin and in all cases resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline.
Conclusion
In order to reduce the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens in ICUs, monitoring and optimization of antimicrobial use in hospitals are strictly recommended. Therefore local resistance surveillance programs are of most value in developing appropriate therapeutic guidelines for specific infections and patient types.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-155
PMCID: PMC1633736  PMID: 17064415
11.  Candidaemia and antifungal therapy in a French University Hospital: rough trends over a decade and possible links 
Background
Evidence for an increased prevalence of candidaemia and for high associated mortality in the 1990s led to a number of different recommendations concerning the management of at risk patients as well as an increase in the availability and prescription of new antifungal agents. The aim of this study was to parallel in our hospital candidemia incidence with the nature of prescribed antifungal drugs between 1993 and 2003.
Methods
During this 10-year period we reviewed all cases of candidemia, and collected all the data about annual consumption of prescribed antifungal drugs
Results
Our centralised clinical mycology laboratory isolates and identifies all yeasts grown from blood cultures obtained from a 3300 bed teaching hospital. Between 1993 and 2003, 430 blood yeast isolates were identified. Examination of the trends in isolation revealed a clear decrease in number of yeast isolates recovered between 1995–2000, whereas the number of positive blood cultures in 2003 rose to 1993 levels. The relative prevalence of Candida albicans and C. glabrata was similar in 1993 and 2003 in contrast to the period 1995–2000 where an increased prevalence of C. glabrata was observed. When these quantitative and qualitative data were compared to the amount and type of antifungal agents prescribed during the same period (annual mean defined daily dose: 2662741; annual mean cost: 615629 €) a single correlation was found between the decrease in number of yeast isolates, the increased prevalence of C. glabrata and the high level of prescription of fluconazole at prophylactic doses between 1995–2000.
Conclusion
Between 1993 and 2000, the number of cases of candidemia halved, with an increase of C. glabrata prevalence. These findings were probably linked to the use of Fluconazole prophylaxis. Although it is not possible to make any recommendations from this data the information is nevertheless interesting and may have considerable implications with the introduction of new antifungal drugs.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-80
PMCID: PMC1475593  PMID: 16670011
12.  The role of beta-lactamase-producing-bacteria in mixed infections 
Beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (BLPB) can play an important role in polymicrobial infections. They can have a direct pathogenic impact in causing the infection as well as an indirect effect through their ability to produce the enzyme beta-lactamase. BLPB may not only survive penicillin therapy but can also, as was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo studies, protect other penicillin-susceptible bacteria from penicillin by releasing the free enzyme into their environment. This phenomenon occurs in upper respiratory tract, skin, soft tissue, surgical and other infections. The clinical, in vitro, and in vivo evidence supporting the role of these organisms in the increased failure rate of penicillin in eradication of these infections and the implication of that increased rate on the management of infections is discussed.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-9-202
PMCID: PMC2804585  PMID: 20003454
13.  Seroprevalence of Immunoglobulin G antibodies against pertussis toxin among asymptomatic medical students in the west of Iran: a cross sectional study 
Background
Pertussis is a highly communicable, vaccine-preventable respiratory infection. Immune response against this disease can be induced by infection or vaccination. Protection after childhood vaccination is minimal after ten years. Our aim was to assess pertussis immunity state in a population of healthy young medical students.
Methods
In this seroepidemiological survey, blood samples were obtained from 163 first-year medical students in Hamedan University, Iran. Serum level of IgG against pertussis toxin (IgG-PT) was measured by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) method. For qualitative assessment, IgG-PT levels more than 24 unit (U)/ml were considered positive. Data was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively considering gender and age groups.
Results
There were 83 males and 80 females, with a mean age of 19.48 years, Prevalence of IgG-PT was 47.6% with mean level of 71.7 u/ml (95% confidence interval: 68.1–75.3). No statistically significant difference was observed with respect to sero-positivity of IgG-PT between males and females (45 cases (54%) vs. 34 cases (42%); P = 0.06). Mean IgG-PT levels in males and females were 84 U/ml and 58.8 U/ml, respectively (P = 0.91).
Conclusion
A considerable proportion of our study population with a positive history of childhood vaccination for pertussis was not serologically immune to pertussis. A booster dose of acellular pertussis vaccine may be indicated in Iranian, medical students regarding their serologic conditions and outstanding role in health care systems.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-9-58
PMCID: PMC2684070  PMID: 19426546
14.  Bloodstream and endovascular infections due to Abiotrophia defectiva and Granulicatella species 
Background
Abiotrophia and Granulicatella species, previously referred to as nutritionally variant streptococci (NVS), are significant causative agents of endocarditis and bacteraemia. In this study, we reviewed the clinical manifestations of infections due to A. defectiva and Granulicatella species that occurred at our institution between 1998 and 2004.
Methods
The analysis included all strains of NVS that were isolated from blood cultures or vascular graft specimens. All strains were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Patients' medical charts were reviewed for each case of infection.
Results
Eleven strains of NVS were isolated during the 6-year period. Identification of the strains by 16S rRNA showed 2 genogroups: Abiotrophia defectiva (3) and Granulicatella adiacens (6) or "para-adiacens" (2). The three A. defectiva strains were isolated from immunocompetent patients with endovascular infections, whereas 7 of 8 Granulicatella spp. strains were isolated from immunosuppressed patients, mainly febrile neutropenic patients. We report the first case of "G. para-adiacens" bacteraemia in the setting of febrile neutropenia.
Conclusion
We propose that Granulicatella spp. be considered as a possible agent of bacteraemia in neutropenic patients.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-9
PMCID: PMC1360077  PMID: 16426445
15.  Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited 
Background
Invasive infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome.
Methods
Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed between 1990 and 2001. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis.
Results
After adjustment for other markers of disease severity, we found that infection with serotype 3 was associated with an increased relative risk (RR) of death of 2.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–5.27), whereas infection with serotype 1 was associated with a decreased risk of death (RR 0.23 (95% CI, 0.06–0.97)). Additionally, older age, relative leucopenia and relative hypothermia were independent predictors of mortality.
Conclusion
Our study shows that capsular serotypes independently influenced the outcome from invasive pneumococcal disease. The limitations of the current polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine warrant the development of alternative vaccines. We suggest that the virulence of pneumococcal serotypes should be considered in the design of novel vaccines.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-4-21
PMCID: PMC455681  PMID: 15228629
16.  Rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with 32 gram liposomal amphotericin B and incomplete surgery: a case report 
Background
Mucormycosis (or zygomycosis) is the term for infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. Mucoraceae may produce severe disease in susceptible individuals, notably patients with diabetes and leukemia. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis most commonly manifests itself in the setting of poorly controlled diabetes, especially with ketoacidosis.
Case Presentation
A 31-year-old diabetic man presented to the outpatient clinic with the following signs and symptoms: headache, periorbital pain, swelling and loss of vision in the right eye. On physical examination his right eye was red and swollen. There was periorbital cellulitis and the conjunctiva was edematous. KOH preparation of purulent discharge showed broad, ribbonlike, aseptate hyphae when examined under a fluorescence microscope. Cranial MRI showed involvement of the right orbit, thrombosis in cavernous sinus and infiltrates at ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. Mucormycosis was diagnosed based on these findings. Amphotericin B (AmBisome®; 2 mg/kg.d) was initiated after the test doses. Right orbitectomy and right partial maxillectomy were performed; the lesions in ethmoid and maxillary sinuses were removed. The duration of the liposomal amphotericin B therapy was approximately 6 months and the total dose of liposomal amphotericin B used was 32 grams. Liposomal amphotericin B therapy was stopped six months later and oral fluconazole was started.
Conclusions
Although a total surgical debridement of the lesions could not be performed, it is remarkable that regression of the disease could be achieved with medical therapy alone.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-1-22
PMCID: PMC60655  PMID: 11737868
17.  Tetrandrine reverses drug resistance in isoniazid and ethambutol dual drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2015;15:153.
Background
Tetrandrine is a natural chemical product purified from fourstamen stephania root which recently has been shown to act similarly as synthesized drug efflux pump inhibitor verapamil. The aim of the study is to examine whether tetrandrine could potentiate anti-tubercular drugs to which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has turned resistant via efflux mechanisms.
Methods
We screened 200 MTB clinical isolates using drug sensitivity test to look for those who have turned resistant to the drugs most probably due to efflux mechanisms. We found 29 isoniazid (INH) and ethambutol (EMB) - dual resistant (IEDR) strains. Then we tested if treatment with tetrandrine or verapamil could reverse drug resistance to INH and/or EMB in IEDR isolates.
Results
There is a parallel resistance among EMB- and INH-resistant strains in the tested clinical isolates. Among INH-resistant strains, 65% was also EMB-resistant. This suggests an involvement of efflux mechanisms which can lead to dual drug resistance in IEDR clinical isolates. Similar to a synthesized efflux pump inhibitor verapamil, tetrandrine treatment together with INH or EMB brought down the MICs from the clinical level of drug resistance to the sensitive range of both drugs. The effective rate reached 82% among IEDR clinical isolates.
Conclusions
Combinational application of tetrandrine with INH or EMB increased drug efficacy. Drugs like tetrandrine may help to reduce drug dosage thus alleviate side effects.
doi:10.1186/s12879-015-0905-0
PMCID: PMC4417324  PMID: 25887373
Tetrandrine; Drug resistance; Efflux pump; Mycobacterium tuberculosis
18.  Clinical features and management of a severe paradoxical reaction associated with combined treatment of Buruli ulcer and HIV co-infection 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2014;14:423.
Background
In West and Central Africa Buruli ulcer (BU) and HIV co-infection is increasingly recognised and management of these two diseases combined is an emerging challenge for which there is little published information. In this case we present a severe paradoxical reaction occurring after commencing antibiotic treatment for BU combined with antiretroviral therapy for HIV, and describe its clinical features and management. This includes to our knowledge the first reported use of prednisolone in Africa to manage a severe paradoxical reaction related to BU treatment.
Case presentation
A 30 year old immunosuppressed HIV positive man from Cameroon developed a severe paradoxical reaction 24 days after commencing antibiotic treatment for BU and 14 days after commencing antiretroviral therapy for HIV. Oral prednisolone was successfully used to settle the reaction and prevent further tissue loss. The antiretroviral regimen was continued unchanged and the BU antibiotic treatment not prolonged beyond the recommended duration of 8 weeks. A second small local paradoxical lesion developed 8 months after starting antibiotics and settled with conservative treatment only. Complete healing of lesions occurred and there was no disease recurrence 12 months after commencement of treatment.
Conclusions
Clinicians should be aware that severe paradoxical reactions can occur during the treatment of BU/HIV co-infected patients. Prednisolone was effectively and safely used to settle the reaction and minimize the secondary tissue damage.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-423) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-423
PMCID: PMC4122778  PMID: 25073531
Mycobacterium ulcerans; Buruli ulcer; HIV; Paradoxical reaction; Antibiotics; Antiretroviral treatment; Prednisolone
19.  Performance comparison of phenotypic and molecular methods for detection and differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2012;12:230.
Background
Candida albicans is the most pathogenic Candida species but shares many phenotypic features with Candida dubliniensis and may, therefore, be misidentified in clinical microbiology laboratories. Candidemia cases due to C. dubliniensis are increasingly being reported in recent years. Accurate identification is warranted since mortality rates are highest for C. albicans infections, however, C. dubliniensis has the propensity to develop resistance against azoles more easily. We developed a duplex PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of C. albicans from C. dubliniensis for resource-poor settings equipped with basic PCR technology and compared its performance with three phenotypic methods.
Methods
Duplex PCR was performed on 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species previously identified by assimilation profiles on Vitek 2 ID-YST system. Typical morphologic characteristics on simplified sunflower seed agar (SSA), and reaction with a commercial (Bichro-Dubli) latex agglutination test were also performed. The assay was further applied on 239 clinical yeast and yeast-like fungi and results were confirmed by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA.
Results
The results of duplex PCR assay for 122 germ tube positive and 12 germ tube negative isolates of Candida species were comparable to their identification by Vitek 2 ID-YST system, colony characteristics on SSA and latex agglutination test. Application of duplex PCR also correctly identified all 148 C. albicans and 50 C. dubliniensis strains among 239 yeast-like fungi.
Conclusions
The data show that both, duplex PCR and Bichro-Dubli are reliable tests for rapid (within few hours) identification of clinical yeast isolates as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans. However, duplex PCR may be applied directly on clinical yeast isolates for their identification as C. dubliniensis or C. albicans as it does not require prior testing for germ tube formation or latex Candida agglutination.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-230
PMCID: PMC3541108  PMID: 23009343
Candida albicans; Candida dubliniensis; Detection; Differentiation; Duplex PCR
20.  Detection of hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus species in the vagina: a comparison of culture and quantitative PCR among HIV-1 seropositive women 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2012;12:188.
Background
The presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) producing Lactobacillus in the vagina may play a role in controlling genital HIV-1 shedding. Sensitive molecular methods improve our ability to characterize the vaginal microbiota; however, they cannot characterize phenotype. We assessed the concordance of H2O2-producing Lactobacillus detected by culture with quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of Lactobacillus species commonly assumed to be H2O2-producers.
Methods
Samples were collected as part of a prospective cohort study of HIV-1 seropositive US women. Cervicovaginal lavage specimens were tested for L. crispatus and L. jensenii using 16S rRNA gene qPCR assays. Vaginal swabs were cultured for Lactobacillus and tested for H2O2-production. We calculated a kappa statistic to assess concordance between culture and qPCR.
Results
Culture and qPCR results were available for 376 visits from 57 women. Lactobacilli were detected by culture at 308 (82%) visits, of which 233 of 308 (76%) produced H2O2. L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii were detected at 215 (57%) visits. Concordance between detection of L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii by qPCR and H2O2-producing Lactobacillus by culture was 75% (kappa = 0.45).
Conclusions
Among HIV-1 seropositive women, there was a moderate level of concordance between H2O2-producing Lactobacillus detected by culture and the presence of L. crispatus and/or L. jensenii by qPCR. However, one-quarter of samples with growth of H2O2-producing lactobacilli did not have L. crispatus or L. jensenii detected by qPCR. This discordance may be due to the presence of other H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-188
PMCID: PMC3462152  PMID: 22889380
Lactobacillus; Lactobacillus crispatus; Lactobacillus jensenii; Bacterial vaginosis; Culture; Hydrogen peroxide; 16S rRNA gene
21.  Candidiasis caused by Candida kefyr in a neonate: Case report 
Background
Systemic Candidia infections are of major concern in neonates, especially in those with risk factors such as longer use of broad spectrum antibiotics. Recent studies showed that also term babies with underlying gastrointestinal or urinary tract abnormalities are much more prone to systemic Candida infection. We report a very rare case of candidiasis caused by Candida kefyr in a term neonate.
Case Presentation
Renal agenesis on the left side was diagnosed antenatally and anal atresia postnatally. Moreover, a vesico-ureteral-reflux (VUR) grade V was detected by cystography. The first surgical procedure, creating a protective colostoma, was uneventful. Afterwards our patient developed urosepsis caused by Enterococcus faecalis and was treated with piperacillin. The child improved initially, but deteriorated again. A further urine analysis revealed Candida kefyr in a significant number. As antibiotic resistance data about this non-albicans Candida species are limited, we started liposomal amphotericin B (AMB), but later changed to fluconazole after receiving the antibiogram. Candiduria persisted and abdominal imaging showed a Candida pyelonephritis. Since high grade reflux was prevalent we instilled AMB into the child's bladder as a therapeutic approach. While undergoing surgery (creating a neo-rectum) a recto-vesical fistula could be shown and subsequently was resected. The child recovered completely under systemic fluconazole therapy over 3 months.
Conclusions
Candidiasis is still of major concern in neonates with accompanying risk factors. As clinicians are confronted with an increasing number of non-albicans Candida species, knowledge about these pathogens and their sensitivities is of major importance.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-61
PMCID: PMC3342153  PMID: 22424058
Children; Candidiasis; Non-albicans Candida species; Urinary tract infection
22.  Streptococcus intermedius causing infective endocarditis and abscesses: a report of three cases and review of the literature 
Background
Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group. Clinical disease with S. intermedius is characterized by abscess formation and rarely endocarditis. Identification of Streptococcus intermedius is difficult, leading to the development of molecular methods to more accurately identify and characterize this organism.
Case presentation
Over a period of 6 months we encountered three cases of invasive Streptococcus intermedius infection presenting as hepatic abscesses, brain abscess, and endocarditis. We confirmed our microbiologic diagnosis through 16S sequencing and found a common virulence gene in each case.
Conclusion
Our report illustrates three different clinical manifestations due to Streptococcus intermedius infection that can be encountered in healthy individuals in a community hospital setting. To our knowledge, this is the first case of Streptococcus intermedius endocarditis confirmed by 16S sequencing analysis. The use of molecular methods may allow a better understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this organism.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-8-154
PMCID: PMC2600825  PMID: 18992173
23.  Recurrent bacteremia with Helicobacter cinaedi: case report and review of the literature 
Background
Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare pathogen in humans, occurring mostly in immuno-compromised patients, with a high potential for recurrence. We describe a case of a patient with lymphoma hospitalized for chemotherapy.
Case presentation
At admission, the patient presented with an indolent and non-prurigenic macular rash around her implantable venous access device. Gram staining of blood cultures revealed the presence of spiral-shaped gram-negative rods that could not be grown upon subculture. Helicobacter cinaedi was identified by PCR. No other symptoms or pathology were observed in a whole body CT scan. The implantable venous access device was removed and empiric therapy by ceftriaxone and gentamicin for 2 weeks was initiated, followed by peroral clarithromycin 2 × 500 mg/day and later by levofloxacin 2 × 500 mg/day for 7 weeks. Oncologic remission was achieved 3 months later. However, the patient was re-hospitalized 2 months later for fever, shivering, reappearance of the macular non-prurigenic rash, diarrhea, cough and asthenia. Blood cultures grew H. cinaedi. Multiple investigations could not identify the source. Empiric antibiotic therapy of ceftriaxone and doxycycline was started for 2 weeks with resolution of symptoms, followed by an oral combination of amoxicillin, metronidazole and doxycycline for 2 months; doxycycline was continued for another month. Bacteremia has not recurred for a period of 19 months.
Conclusion
Although H. cinaedi is considered to be a low virulent bacteria, its potential to cause recurrent bacteremia should not be underestimated. H. cinaedi could have an endovascular source of infection and should be treated for an adequate duration with combined antibiotherapy.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-86
PMCID: PMC1482711  PMID: 16719920
24.  Mediterranean spotted fever: clinical and laboratory characteristics of 415 Sicilian children 
Background
Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is an acute febrile, zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii and transmitted to humans by the brown dogtick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Nearly four hundred cases are reported every year (mainly from June to September) on the Italian island of Sicily. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with MSF and the efficacy of the drugs administered.
Methods
Our study was carried out on 415 children with MSF, during the period January 1997 – December 2004, at the "G. Di Cristina" Children's hospital in Palermo, Sicily, Italy. On admission patients' clinical history, physical and laboratory examination and indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) for Rickettsia conorii were performed. Diagnosis was considered confirmed if the patients had an MSF diagnostic score greater than or equal to 25 according to the Raoult's scoring system. All patients were treated with chloramphenicol or with macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin).
Results
Fever, rash and tache noire were present in 386 (93%), 392 (94.5%) and 263 (63.4%) cases respectively. Eighteen (4.6%) children showed atypical exanthema. Chloramphenicol and newer macrolides all appeared to be effective and safe therapies.
Conclusion
Clinical features of 415 children with MSF were similar to those reported by other authors except for a lower incidence of headache, arthralgia and myalgia and a higher frequency of epato-splenomegaly. Concerning therapy, clarithromycin can be considered a valid alternative therapy to tetracyclines or chloramphenicol especially for children aged < eight years.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-60
PMCID: PMC1435909  PMID: 16553943
25.  Risk factors for fatal candidemia caused by Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species 
Background
Invasive fungal infections, such as candidemia, caused by Candida species have been increasing. Candidemia is not only associated with a high mortality (30% to 40%) but also extends the length of hospital stay and increases the costs of medical care. Sepsis caused by Candida species is clinically indistinguishable from bacterial infections. Although, the clinical presentations of the patients with candidemia caused by Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NAC) are indistinguishable, the susceptibilities to antifungal agents of these species are different. In this study, we attempted to identify the risk factors for candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC in the hope that this may guide initial empiric therapy.
Methods
A retrospective chart review was conducted during 1996 to 1999 at the Veterans General Hospital-Taipei.
Results
There were 130 fatal cases of candidemia, including 68 patients with C. albicans and 62 with NAC. Candidemia was the most likely cause of death in 55 of the 130 patients (42.3 %). There was no significant difference in the distribution of Candida species between those died of candidemia and those died of underlying conditions. Patients who had one of the following conditions were more likely to have C. albicans, age ≧ 65 years, immunosuppression accounted to prior use of steroids, leukocytosis, in the intensive care unit (ICU), and intravascular and urinary catheters. Patients who had undergone cancer chemotherapy often appeared less critically ill and were more likely to have NAC.
Conclusion
Clinical and epidemiological differences in the risk factors between candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC may provide helpful clues to initiate empiric therapy for patients infected with C. albicans versus NAC.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-5-22
PMCID: PMC1090575  PMID: 15813977

Results 1-25 (5585)