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author:("Ma, taylor P.")
1.  Zebrafish sox9b is crucial for hepatopancreatic duct development and pancreatic endocrine cell regeneration 
Developmental biology  2012;366(2):268-278.
Recent zebrafish studies have shown that the late appearing pancreatic endocrine cells derive from pancreatic ducts but the regulatory factors involved are still largely unknown. Here, we show that the zebrafish sox9b gene is expressed in pancreatic ducts where it labels the pancreatic Notch-responsive cells previously shown to be progenitors. Inactivation of sox9b disturbs duct formation and impairs regeneration of beta cells from these ducts in larvae. sox9b expression in the midtrunk endoderm appears at the junction of the hepatic and ventral pancreatic buds and, by the end of embryogenesis, labels the hepatopancreatic ductal system as well as the intrapancreatic and intrahepatic ducts. Ductal morphogenesis and differentiation are specifically disrupted in sox9b mutants, with the dysmorphic hepatopancreatic ducts containing misdifferentiated hepatocyte-like and pancreatic-like cells. We also show that maintenance of sox9b expression in the extrapancreatic and intrapancreatic ducts requires FGF and Notch activity, respectively, both pathways known to prevent excessive endocrine differentiation in these ducts. Furthermore, beta cell recovery after specific ablation is severely compromised in sox9b mutant larvae. Our data position sox9b as a key player in the generation of secondary endocrine cells deriving from pancreatic ducts in zebrafish.
doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2012.04.002
PMCID: PMC3364407  PMID: 22537488
duct; beta cell regeneration; pancreas; sox9; Notch; FGF
2.  Tardbpl splicing rescues motor neuron and axonal development in a mutant tardbp zebrafish 
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(12):2376-2386.
Mutations in the transactive response DNA binding protein-43 (TARDBP/TDP-43) gene, which regulates transcription and splicing, causes a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we characterize and report the first tardbp mutation in zebrafish, which introduces a premature stop codon (Y220X), eliminating expression of the Tardbp protein. Another TARDBP ortholog, tardbpl, in zebrafish is shown to encode a Tardbp-like protein which is truncated compared with Tardbp itself and lacks part of the C-terminal glycine-rich domain (GRD). Here, we show that tardbp mutation leads to the generation of a novel tardbpl splice form (tardbpl-FL) capable of making a full-length Tardbp protein (Tardbpl-FL), which compensates for the loss of Tardbp. This finding provides a novel in vivo model to study TDP-43-mediated splicing regulation. Additionally, we show that elimination of both zebrafish TARDBP orthologs results in a severe motor phenotype with shortened motor axons, locomotion defects and death at around 10 days post fertilization. The Tardbp/Tardbpl knockout model generated in this study provides an excellent in vivo system to study the role of the functional loss of Tardbp and its involvement in ALS pathogenesis.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt082
PMCID: PMC3658164  PMID: 23427147
3.  Regulation of intrahepatic biliary duct morphogenesis by Claudin 15-like b 
Developmental biology  2011;361(1):68-78.
The intrahepatic biliary ducts transport bile produced by the hepatocytes out of the liver. Defects in biliary cell differentiation and biliary duct remodeling cause a variety of congenital diseases including Alagille Syndrome and polycystic liver disease. While the molecular pathways regulating biliary cell differentiation have received increasing attention (Lemaigre, 2010), less is known about the cellular behavior underlying biliary duct remodeling. Here, we have identified a novel gene, claudin 15-like b (cldn15lb), which exhibits a unique and dynamic expression pattern in the hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells in zebrafish. Claudins are tight junction proteins that have been implicated in maintaining epithelial polarity, regulating paracellular transport, and providing barrier function. In zebrafish cldn15lb mutant livers, tight junctions are observed between hepatocytes, but these cells show polarization defects as well as canalicular malformations. Furthermore, cldn15lb mutants show abnormalities in biliary duct morphogenesis whereby biliary epithelial cells remain clustered together and form a disorganized network. Our data suggest that Cldn15lb plays an important role in the remodeling process during biliary duct morphogenesis. Thus, cldn15lb mutants provide a novel in vivo model to study the role of tight junction proteins in the remodeling of the biliary network and hereditary cholestasis.
doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.10.004
PMCID: PMC3235368  PMID: 22020048
Claudin; liver development; zebrafish; biliary duct remodeling; biliary cells; biliary duct morphogenesis; tight junctions; cholestasis
4.  sox9b Is a Key Regulator of Pancreaticobiliary Ductal System Development 
PLoS Genetics  2012;8(6):e1002754.
The pancreaticobiliary ductal system connects the liver and pancreas to the intestine. It is composed of the hepatopancreatic ductal (HPD) system as well as the intrahepatic biliary ducts and the intrapancreatic ducts. Despite its physiological importance, the development of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system remains poorly understood. The SRY-related transcription factor SOX9 is expressed in the mammalian pancreaticobiliary ductal system, but the perinatal lethality of Sox9 heterozygous mice makes loss-of-function analyses challenging. We turned to the zebrafish to assess the role of SOX9 in pancreaticobiliary ductal system development. We first show that zebrafish sox9b recapitulates the expression pattern of mouse Sox9 in the pancreaticobiliary ductal system and use a nonsense allele of sox9b, sox9bfh313, to dissect its function in the morphogenesis of this structure. Strikingly, sox9bfh313 homozygous mutants survive to adulthood and exhibit cholestasis associated with hepatic and pancreatic duct proliferation, cyst formation, and fibrosis. Analysis of sox9bfh313 mutant embryos and larvae reveals that the HPD cells appear to mis-differentiate towards hepatic and/or pancreatic fates, resulting in a dysmorphic structure. The intrahepatic biliary cells are specified but fail to assemble into a functional network. Similarly, intrapancreatic duct formation is severely impaired in sox9bfh313 mutants, while the embryonic endocrine and acinar compartments appear unaffected. The defects in the intrahepatic and intrapancreatic ducts of sox9bfh313 mutants worsen during larval and juvenile stages, prompting the adult phenotype. We further show that Sox9b interacts with Notch signaling to regulate intrahepatic biliary network formation: sox9b expression is positively regulated by Notch signaling, while Sox9b function is required to maintain Notch signaling in the intrahepatic biliary cells. Together, these data reveal key roles for SOX9 in the morphogenesis of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system, and they cast human Sox9 as a candidate gene for pancreaticobiliary duct malformation-related pathologies.
Author Summary
The liver and pancreas function as exocrine glands that secrete bile and pancreatic juice, respectively, to aid the digestion and absorption of nutrients. These fluids reach the intestine via the pancreaticobiliary ductal system, a complex network of ducts. Despite its pivotal role, the development of this ductal system is poorly understood. We have discovered that the zebrafish transcription factor gene sox9b, like its mammalian ortholog, is specifically expressed in the pancreaticobiliary ductal system. The perinatal lethality of Sox9 heterozygous mice makes the analysis of SOX9 function challenging; thus, we turned to the zebrafish to analyze the role of SOX9 in pancreaticobiliary ductal system development. We found that zebrafish sox9b mutants, which survive to adulthood, display defects in the morphogenesis of this ductal network: the intrahepatic and intrapancreatic ducts fail to form a branched network, whereas the ducts connecting the liver and pancreas to the intestine are malformed. These ductal defects affect bile transport and lead to cholestasis in adult mutant fish. At the molecular level, Sox9b interacts with the Notch signaling pathway to regulate the development of the intrahepatic biliary network. Therefore, our work in zebrafish reveals a broad and complex role for SOX9 in pancreaticobiliary ductal system morphogenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002754
PMCID: PMC3375260  PMID: 22719264
5.  Defective cranial skeletal development, larval lethality and haploinsufficiency in Myod mutant zebrafish 
Developmental biology  2011;358(1):102-112.
Summary
Myogenic regulatory factors of the myod family (MRFs) are transcription factors essential for mammalian skeletal myogenesis. Here we show that a mutation in the zebrafish myod gene delays and reduces early somitic and pectoral fin myogenesis, reduces miR-206 expression, and leads to a persistent reduction in somite size until at least the independent feeding stage. A mutation in myog, encoding a second MRF, has little obvious phenotype at early stages, but exacerbates the loss of somitic muscle caused by lack of Myod. Mutation of both myod and myf5 ablates all skeletal muscle. Haploinsufficiency of myod leads to reduced embryonic somite muscle bulk. Lack of Myod causes a severe reduction in cranial musculature, ablating most muscles including the protractor pectoralis, a putative cucullaris homologue. This phenotype is accompanied by a severe dysmorphology of the cartilaginous skeleton and failure of maturation of several cranial bones, including the opercle. As myod expression is restricted to myogenic cells, the data show that myogenesis is essential for proper skeletogenesis in the head.
doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.07.015
PMCID: PMC3360969  PMID: 21798255
muscle; zebrafish; myosin; slow; fiber; fast; myod; myogenin; myf5; miR-206; skeleton; bone; cartilage; head; fin; haploinsufficiency
6.  Asymmetric inhibition of Ulk2 causes left-right differences in habenular neuropil formation 
SUMMARY
Studies of the zebrafish epithalamus have provided recent insights into the development of left-right brain asymmetry, which is crucial to normal human brain function. The habenular nuclei (Hb) of zebrafish are robustly asymmetric, with dense elaboration of neuropil only in the left lateral subnucleus. Because this feature is tightly correlated with asymmetric expression of K+ channel tetramerization domain-containing proteins 12.1 and 12.2 (Kctd12.1/12.2), we screened for Kctd12.1-interacting proteins to identify molecular mechanisms leading to neuropil asymmetry, and uncovered a novel interaction between Kctd12.1 and Unc-51-like kinase 2 (Ulk2). We show here that knockdown of Ulk2 or overexpression of Kctd12 proteins reduce asymmetric neuropil elaboration. Conversely, overexpression of Ulk2 or mutation of kctd12 genes cause excess neuropil elaboration. We conclude that Ulk2 activity promotes neuropil elaboration while Kctd12 proteins limit Ulk2 activity asymmetrically. This work describes a regulatory mechanism for neuronal process extension that may be conserved in other developmental contexts in addition to the epithalamus.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0435-11.2011
PMCID: PMC3142468  PMID: 21734278
Kctd12; zebrafish; epithalamus; habenular nuclei
7.  Reverse genetics in zebrafish by TILLING 
TILLING, for Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, is a reverse genetics strategy that identifies mutations in specific genes of interest in chemically mutagenized populations. First described in 2000 for mutation detection in Arabidopsis, TILLING is now used in a wide range of plants including soybean, rice, barley and maize as well as for animal model systems, including Arabidopsis, Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat, medaka and zebrafish and for the discovery of naturally occurring polymorphisms in humans. This review summarizes current TILLING methodologies as they have been applied to the zebrafish, ongoing TILLING projects and resources in the zebrafish community, and the future of zebrafish TILLING.
doi:10.1093/bfgp/eln046
PMCID: PMC2899843  PMID: 19028802
zebrafish; TILLING; Cel1 mismatch cleavage; resequencing; reverse genetics

Results 1-7 (7)