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1.  The MetaCyc database of metabolic pathways and enzymes and the BioCyc collection of Pathway/Genome Databases 
Nucleic Acids Research  2013;42(D1):D459-D471.
The MetaCyc database (MetaCyc.org) is a comprehensive and freely accessible database describing metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. MetaCyc pathways are experimentally determined, mostly small-molecule metabolic pathways and are curated from the primary scientific literature. MetaCyc contains >2100 pathways derived from >37 000 publications, and is the largest curated collection of metabolic pathways currently available. BioCyc (BioCyc.org) is a collection of >3000 organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs), each containing the full genome and predicted metabolic network of one organism, including metabolites, enzymes, reactions, metabolic pathways, predicted operons, transport systems and pathway-hole fillers. Additions to BioCyc over the past 2 years include YeastCyc, a PGDB for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and 891 new genomes from the Human Microbiome Project. The BioCyc Web site offers a variety of tools for querying and analysis of PGDBs, including Omics Viewers and tools for comparative analysis. New developments include atom mappings in reactions, a new representation of glycan degradation pathways, improved compound structure display, better coverage of enzyme kinetic data, enhancements of the Web Groups functionality, improvements to the Omics viewers, a new representation of the Enzyme Commission system and, for the desktop version of the software, the ability to save display states.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1103
PMCID: PMC3964957  PMID: 24225315
2.  A systematic comparison of the MetaCyc and KEGG pathway databases 
BMC Bioinformatics  2013;14:112.
Background
The MetaCyc and KEGG projects have developed large metabolic pathway databases that are used for a variety of applications including genome analysis and metabolic engineering. We present a comparison of the compound, reaction, and pathway content of MetaCyc version 16.0 and a KEGG version downloaded on Feb-27-2012 to increase understanding of their relative sizes, their degree of overlap, and their scope. To assess their overlap, we must know the correspondences between compounds, reactions, and pathways in MetaCyc, and those in KEGG. We devoted significant effort to computational and manual matching of these entities, and we evaluated the accuracy of the correspondences.
Results
KEGG contains 179 module pathways versus 1,846 base pathways in MetaCyc; KEGG contains 237 map pathways versus 296 super pathways in MetaCyc. KEGG pathways contain 3.3 times as many reactions on average as do MetaCyc pathways, and the databases employ different conceptualizations of metabolic pathways. KEGG contains 8,692 reactions versus 10,262 for MetaCyc. 6,174 KEGG reactions are components of KEGG pathways versus 6,348 for MetaCyc. KEGG contains 16,586 compounds versus 11,991 for MetaCyc. 6,912 KEGG compounds act as substrates in KEGG reactions versus 8,891 for MetaCyc. MetaCyc contains a broader set of database attributes than does KEGG, such as relationships from a compound to enzymes that it regulates, identification of spontaneous reactions, and the expected taxonomic range of metabolic pathways. MetaCyc contains many pathways not found in KEGG, from plants, fungi, metazoa, and actinobacteria; KEGG contains pathways not found in MetaCyc, for xenobiotic degradation, glycan metabolism, and metabolism of terpenoids and polyketides. MetaCyc contains fewer unbalanced reactions, which facilitates metabolic modeling such as using flux-balance analysis. MetaCyc includes generic reactions that may be instantiated computationally.
Conclusions
KEGG contains significantly more compounds than does MetaCyc, whereas MetaCyc contains significantly more reactions and pathways than does KEGG, in particular KEGG modules are quite incomplete. The number of reactions occurring in pathways in the two DBs are quite similar.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-14-112
PMCID: PMC3665663  PMID: 23530693
Pathway databases; Database comparison
3.  A Survey of Metabolic Databases Emphasizing the MetaCyc Family 
Archives of Toxicology  2011;85(9):1015-1033.
Thanks to the confluence of genome sequencing and bioinformatics, the number of metabolic databases has expanded from a handful in the mid 1990s to several thousand today. These databases lie within distinct families that have common ancestry and common attributes. The main families are the MetaCyc, KEGG, Reactome, Model SEED, and BiGG families. We survey these database families, as well as important individual metabolic databases, including multiple human metabolic databases. The MetaCyc family is described in particular detail. It contains well over 1,000 databases, including highly curated databases for Escherichia coli, Saccharamyces cerevisiae, Mus musculus, and Arabidopsis thaliana. These databases are available through a number of web sites that offer a range of software tools for querying and visualizing metabolic networks. These web sites also provide multiple tools for analysis of gene expression and metabolomics data, including visualization of those datasets on metabolic network diagrams, and overrepresentation analysis of gene sets and metabolite sets.
doi:10.1007/s00204-011-0705-2
PMCID: PMC3352032  PMID: 21523460
4.  The Pathway Tools Pathway Prediction Algorithm 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2011;5(3):424-429.
The PathoLogic component of the Pathway Tools software performs prediction of metabolic pathways in sequenced and annotated genomes. This article provides a detailed presentation of the PathoLogic algorithm. The algorithm consists of two phases. The reactome inference phase infers the reactions catalyzed by the organism from the set of enzymes present in the annotated genome. The pathway inference phase infers the metabolic pathways present in the organism from the reactions catalyzed by the organism. Both phases draw on the MetaCyc database of metabolic reactions and pathways. MetaCyc contains two data fields to support pathway inference: the expected taxonomic range of each pathway, and a list of key reactions for pathways. These fields have significantly increased the predictive accuracy of PathoLogic.
doi:10.4056/sigs.1794338
PMCID: PMC3368424  PMID: 22675592
5.  The MetaCyc database of metabolic pathways and enzymes and the BioCyc collection of pathway/genome databases 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;40(D1):D742-D753.
The MetaCyc database (http://metacyc.org/) provides a comprehensive and freely accessible resource for metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. The pathways in MetaCyc are experimentally determined, small-molecule metabolic pathways and are curated from the primary scientific literature. MetaCyc contains more than 1800 pathways derived from more than 30 000 publications, and is the largest curated collection of metabolic pathways currently available. Most reactions in MetaCyc pathways are linked to one or more well-characterized enzymes, and both pathways and enzymes are annotated with reviews, evidence codes and literature citations. BioCyc (http://biocyc.org/) is a collection of more than 1700 organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs). Each BioCyc PGDB contains the full genome and predicted metabolic network of one organism. The network, which is predicted by the Pathway Tools software using MetaCyc as a reference database, consists of metabolites, enzymes, reactions and metabolic pathways. BioCyc PGDBs contain additional features, including predicted operons, transport systems and pathway-hole fillers. The BioCyc website and Pathway Tools software offer many tools for querying and analysis of PGDBs, including Omics Viewers and comparative analysis. New developments include a zoomable web interface for diagrams; flux-balance analysis model generation from PGDBs; web services; and a new tool called Web Groups.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr1014
PMCID: PMC3245006  PMID: 22102576
6.  Pathway Tools version 13.0: integrated software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2009;11(1):40-79.
Pathway Tools is a production-quality software environment for creating a type of model-organism database called a Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB). A PGDB such as EcoCyc integrates the evolving understanding of the genes, proteins, metabolic network and regulatory network of an organism. This article provides an overview of Pathway Tools capabilities. The software performs multiple computational inferences including prediction of metabolic pathways, prediction of metabolic pathway hole fillers and prediction of operons. It enables interactive editing of PGDBs by DB curators. It supports web publishing of PGDBs, and provides a large number of query and visualization tools. The software also supports comparative analyses of PGDBs, and provides several systems biology analyses of PGDBs including reachability analysis of metabolic networks, and interactive tracing of metabolites through a metabolic network. More than 800 PGDBs have been created using Pathway Tools by scientists around the world, many of which are curated DBs for important model organisms. Those PGDBs can be exchanged using a peer-to-peer DB sharing system called the PGDB Registry.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbp043
PMCID: PMC2810111  PMID: 19955237
Genome informatics; Metabolic pathways; Pathway bioinformatics; Model organism databases; Genome databases; Biological networks; Regulatory networks
8.  The MetaCyc database of metabolic pathways and enzymes and the BioCyc collection of pathway/genome databases 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;38(Database issue):D473-D479.
The MetaCyc database (MetaCyc.org) is a comprehensive and freely accessible resource for metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. The pathways in MetaCyc are experimentally determined, small-molecule metabolic pathways and are curated from the primary scientific literature. With more than 1400 pathways, MetaCyc is the largest collection of metabolic pathways currently available. Pathways reactions are linked to one or more well-characterized enzymes, and both pathways and enzymes are annotated with reviews, evidence codes, and literature citations. BioCyc (BioCyc.org) is a collection of more than 500 organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs). Each BioCyc PGDB contains the full genome and predicted metabolic network of one organism. The network, which is predicted by the Pathway Tools software using MetaCyc as a reference, consists of metabolites, enzymes, reactions and metabolic pathways. BioCyc PGDBs also contain additional features, such as predicted operons, transport systems, and pathway hole-fillers. The BioCyc Web site offers several tools for the analysis of the PGDBs, including Omics Viewers that enable visualization of omics datasets on two different genome-scale diagrams and tools for comparative analysis. The BioCyc PGDBs generated by SRI are offered for adoption by any party interested in curation of metabolic, regulatory, and genome-related information about an organism.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp875
PMCID: PMC2808959  PMID: 19850718
9.  The MetaCyc Database of metabolic pathways and enzymes and the BioCyc collection of Pathway/Genome Databases 
Nucleic Acids Research  2007;36(Database issue):D623-D631.
MetaCyc (MetaCyc.org) is a universal database of metabolic pathways and enzymes from all domains of life. The pathways in MetaCyc are curated from the primary scientific literature, and are experimentally determined small-molecule metabolic pathways. Each reaction in a MetaCyc pathway is annotated with one or more well-characterized enzymes. Because MetaCyc contains only experimentally elucidated knowledge, it provides a uniquely high-quality resource for metabolic pathways and enzymes. BioCyc (BioCyc.org) is a collection of more than 350 organism-specific Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs). Each BioCyc PGDB contains the predicted metabolic network of one organism, including metabolic pathways, enzymes, metabolites and reactions predicted by the Pathway Tools software using MetaCyc as a reference database. BioCyc PGDBs also contain predicted operons and predicted pathway hole fillers—predictions of which enzymes may catalyze pathway reactions that have not been assigned to an enzyme. The BioCyc website offers many tools for computational analysis of PGDBs, including comparative analysis and analysis of omics data in a pathway context. The BioCyc PGDBs generated by SRI are offered for adoption by any interested party for the ongoing integration of metabolic and genome-related information about an organism.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkm900
PMCID: PMC2238876  PMID: 17965431
10.  MetaCyc: a multiorganism database of metabolic pathways and enzymes 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;34(Database issue):D511-D516.
MetaCyc is a database of metabolic pathways and enzymes located at . Its goal is to serve as a metabolic encyclopedia, containing a collection of non-redundant pathways central to small molecule metabolism, which have been reported in the experimental literature. Most of the pathways in MetaCyc occur in microorganisms and plants, although animal pathways are also represented. MetaCyc contains metabolic pathways, enzymatic reactions, enzymes, chemical compounds, genes and review-level comments. Enzyme information includes substrate specificity, kinetic properties, activators, inhibitors, cofactor requirements and links to sequence and structure databases. Data are curated from the primary literature by curators with expertise in biochemistry and molecular biology. MetaCyc serves as a readily accessible comprehensive resource on microbial and plant pathways for genome analysis, basic research, education, metabolic engineering and systems biology. Querying, visualization and curation of the database is supported by SRI's Pathway Tools software. The PathoLogic component of Pathway Tools is used in conjunction with MetaCyc to predict the metabolic network of an organism from its annotated genome. SRI and the European Bioinformatics Institute employed this tool to create pathway/genome databases (PGDBs) for 165 organisms, available at the website. These PGDBs also include predicted operons and pathway hole fillers.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkj128
PMCID: PMC1347490  PMID: 16381923
11.  Sequence Analysis of a 101-Kilobase Plasmid Required for Agar Degradation by a Microscilla Isolate 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology  2001;67(12):5771-5779.
An agar-degrading marine bacterium identified as a Microscilla species was isolated from coastal California marine sediment. This organism harbored a single 101-kb circular DNA plasmid designated pSD15. The complete nucleotide sequence of pSD15 was obtained, and sequence analysis indicated a number of genes putatively encoding a variety of enzymes involved in polysaccharide utilization. The most striking feature was the occurrence of five putative agarase genes. Loss of the plasmid, which occurred at a surprisingly high frequency, was associated with loss of agarase activity, supporting the sequence analysis results.
doi:10.1128/AEM.67.12.5771-5779.2001
PMCID: PMC93371  PMID: 11722934
12.  c-Type Cytochromes and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida MnB1 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology  1998;64(10):3549-3555.
Pseudomonas putida MnB1 is an isolate from an Mn oxide-encrusted pipeline that can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides. We used transposon mutagenesis to construct mutants of strain MnB1 that are unable to oxidize manganese, and we characterized some of these mutants. The mutants were divided into three groups: mutants defective in the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes, mutants defective in genes that encode key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mutants defective in the biosynthesis of tryptophan. The mutants in the first two groups were cytochrome c oxidase negative and did not contain c-type cytochromes. Mn(II) oxidation capability could be recovered in a c-type cytochrome biogenesis-defective mutant by complementation of the mutation.
PMCID: PMC106463  PMID: 9758766

Results 1-12 (12)