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1.  BioHackathon series in 2011 and 2012: penetration of ontology and linked data in life science domains 
Katayama, Toshiaki | Wilkinson, Mark D | Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F | Kawashima, Shuichi | Yamamoto, Yasunori | Yamaguchi, Atsuko | Okamoto, Shinobu | Kawano, Shin | Kim, Jin-Dong | Wang, Yue | Wu, Hongyan | Kano, Yoshinobu | Ono, Hiromasa | Bono, Hidemasa | Kocbek, Simon | Aerts, Jan | Akune, Yukie | Antezana, Erick | Arakawa, Kazuharu | Aranda, Bruno | Baran, Joachim | Bolleman, Jerven | Bonnal, Raoul JP | Buttigieg, Pier Luigi | Campbell, Matthew P | Chen, Yi-an | Chiba, Hirokazu | Cock, Peter JA | Cohen, K Bretonnel | Constantin, Alexandru | Duck, Geraint | Dumontier, Michel | Fujisawa, Takatomo | Fujiwara, Toyofumi | Goto, Naohisa | Hoehndorf, Robert | Igarashi, Yoshinobu | Itaya, Hidetoshi | Ito, Maori | Iwasaki, Wataru | Kalaš, Matúš | Katoda, Takeo | Kim, Taehong | Kokubu, Anna | Komiyama, Yusuke | Kotera, Masaaki | Laibe, Camille | Lapp, Hilmar | Lütteke, Thomas | Marshall, M Scott | Mori, Takaaki | Mori, Hiroshi | Morita, Mizuki | Murakami, Katsuhiko | Nakao, Mitsuteru | Narimatsu, Hisashi | Nishide, Hiroyo | Nishimura, Yosuke | Nystrom-Persson, Johan | Ogishima, Soichi | Okamura, Yasunobu | Okuda, Shujiro | Oshita, Kazuki | Packer, Nicki H | Prins, Pjotr | Ranzinger, Rene | Rocca-Serra, Philippe | Sansone, Susanna | Sawaki, Hiromichi | Shin, Sung-Ho | Splendiani, Andrea | Strozzi, Francesco | Tadaka, Shu | Toukach, Philip | Uchiyama, Ikuo | Umezaki, Masahito | Vos, Rutger | Whetzel, Patricia L | Yamada, Issaku | Yamasaki, Chisato | Yamashita, Riu | York, William S | Zmasek, Christian M | Kawamoto, Shoko | Takagi, Toshihisa
The application of semantic technologies to the integration of biological data and the interoperability of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools has been the common theme of a series of annual BioHackathons hosted in Japan for the past five years. Here we provide a review of the activities and outcomes from the BioHackathons held in 2011 in Kyoto and 2012 in Toyama. In order to efficiently implement semantic technologies in the life sciences, participants formed various sub-groups and worked on the following topics: Resource Description Framework (RDF) models for specific domains, text mining of the literature, ontology development, essential metadata for biological databases, platforms to enable efficient Semantic Web technology development and interoperability, and the development of applications for Semantic Web data. In this review, we briefly introduce the themes covered by these sub-groups. The observations made, conclusions drawn, and software development projects that emerged from these activities are discussed.
doi:10.1186/2041-1480-5-5
PMCID: PMC3978116  PMID: 24495517
BioHackathon; Bioinformatics; Semantic Web; Web services; Ontology; Visualization; Knowledge representation; Databases; Semantic interoperability; Data models; Data sharing; Data integration
2.  Experimental Design-Based Functional Mining and Characterization of High-Throughput Sequencing Data in the Sequence Read Archive 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e77910.
High-throughput sequencing technology, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS), has the potential to revolutionize the whole process of genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and epigenetics. Sequencing data is captured in a public primary data archive, the Sequence Read Archive (SRA). As of January 2013, data from more than 14,000 projects have been submitted to SRA, which is double that of the previous year. Researchers can download raw sequence data from SRA website to perform further analyses and to compare with their own data. However, it is extremely difficult to search entries and download raw sequences of interests with SRA because the data structure is complicated, and experimental conditions along with raw sequences are partly described in natural language. Additionally, some sequences are of inconsistent quality because anyone can submit sequencing data to SRA with no quality check. Therefore, as a criterion of data quality, we focused on SRA entries that were cited in journal articles. We extracted SRA IDs and PubMed IDs (PMIDs) from SRA and full-text versions of journal articles and retrieved 2748 SRA ID-PMID pairs. We constructed a publication list referring to SRA entries. Since, one of the main themes of -omics analyses is clarification of disease mechanisms, we also characterized SRA entries by disease keywords, according to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) extracted from articles assigned to each SRA entry. We obtained 989 SRA ID-MeSH disease term pairs, and constructed a disease list referring to SRA data. We previously developed feature profiles of diseases in a system called “Gendoo”. We generated hyperlinks between diseases extracted from SRA and the feature profiles of it. The developed project, publication and disease lists resulting from this study are available at our web service, called “DBCLS SRA” (http://sra.dbcls.jp/). This service will improve accessibility to high-quality data from SRA.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077910
PMCID: PMC3805581  PMID: 24167589
3.  Identification of Key Uric Acid Synthesis Pathway in a Unique Mutant Silkworm Bombyx mori Model of Parkinson’s Disease 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e69130.
Plasma uric acid (UA) levels decrease following clinical progression and stage development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying decreases in plasma UA levels remain unclear, and the potential to apply mutagenesis to a PD model has not previously been discovered. We identified a unique mutant of the silkworm Bombyx mori (B.mori) op. Initially, we investigated the causality of the phenotypic “op” by microarray analysis using our constructed KAIKO functional annotation pipeline. Consequently, we found a novel UA synthesis-modulating pathway, from DJ-1 to xanthine oxidase, and established methods for large-scale analysis of gene expression in B. mori. We found that the mRNA levels of genes in this pathway were significantly lower in B. mori op mutants, indicating that downstream events in the signal transduction cascade might be prevented. Additionally, levels of B.mori tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DJ-1 mRNA were significantly lower in the brain of B. mori op mutants. UA content was significantly lower in the B. mori op mutant tissues and hemolymph. The possibility that the B. mori op mutant might be due to loss of DJ-1 function was supported by the observed vulnerability to oxidative stress. These results suggest that UA synthesis, transport, elimination and accumulation are decreased by environmental oxidative stress in the B. mori op mutant. In the case of B. mori op mutants, the relatively low availability of UA appears to be due both to the oxidation of DJ-1 and to its expenditure to mitigate the effects of environmental oxidative stress. Our findings are expected to provide information needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of decreased plasma UA levels in the clinical stage progression of PD.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069130
PMCID: PMC3722175  PMID: 23894418
4.  GGRNA: an ultrafast, transcript-oriented search engine for genes and transcripts 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;40(Web Server issue):W592-W596.
GGRNA (http://GGRNA.dbcls.jp/) is a Google-like, ultrafast search engine for genes and transcripts. The web server accepts arbitrary words and phrases, such as gene names, IDs, gene descriptions, annotations of gene and even nucleotide/amino acid sequences through one simple search box, and quickly returns relevant RefSeq transcripts. A typical search takes just a few seconds, which dramatically enhances the usability of routine searching. In particular, GGRNA can search sequences as short as 10 nt or 4 amino acids, which cannot be handled easily by popular sequence analysis tools. Nucleotide sequences can be searched allowing up to three mismatches, or the query sequences may contain degenerate nucleotide codes (e.g. N, R, Y, S). Furthermore, Gene Ontology annotations, Enzyme Commission numbers and probe sequences of catalog microarrays are also incorporated into GGRNA, which may help users to conduct searches by various types of keywords. GGRNA web server will provide a simple and powerful interface for finding genes and transcripts for a wide range of users. All services at GGRNA are provided free of charge to all users.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks448
PMCID: PMC3394333  PMID: 22641850
5.  Tutorial videos of bioinformatics resources: online distribution trial in Japan named TogoTV 
Briefings in Bioinformatics  2011;13(2):258-268.
In recent years, biological web resources such as databases and tools have become more complex because of the enormous amounts of data generated in the field of life sciences. Traditional methods of distributing tutorials include publishing textbooks and posting web documents, but these static contents cannot adequately describe recent dynamic web services. Due to improvements in computer technology, it is now possible to create dynamic content such as video with minimal effort and low cost on most modern computers. The ease of creating and distributing video tutorials instead of static content improves accessibility for researchers, annotators and curators. This article focuses on online video repositories for educational and tutorial videos provided by resource developers and users. It also describes a project in Japan named TogoTV (http://togotv.dbcls.jp/en/) and discusses the production and distribution of high-quality tutorial videos, which would be useful to viewer, with examples. This article intends to stimulate and encourage researchers who develop and use databases and tools to distribute how-to videos as a tool to enhance product usability.
doi:10.1093/bib/bbr039
PMCID: PMC3294242  PMID: 21803786
screencast; vodcast; tutorial; YouTube; QuickTime; Flash
6.  Allie: a database and a search service of abbreviations and long forms 
Many abbreviations are used in the literature especially in the life sciences, and polysemous abbreviations appear frequently, making it difficult to read and understand scientific papers that are outside of a reader’s expertise. Thus, we have developed Allie, a database and a search service of abbreviations and their long forms (a.k.a. full forms or definitions). Allie searches for abbreviations and their corresponding long forms in a database that we have generated based on all titles and abstracts in MEDLINE. When a user query matches an abbreviation, Allie returns all potential long forms of the query along with their bibliographic data (i.e. title and publication year). In addition, for each candidate, co-occurring abbreviations and a research field in which it frequently appears in the MEDLINE data are displayed. This function helps users learn about the context in which an abbreviation appears. To deal with synonymous long forms, we use a dictionary called GENA that contains domain-specific terms such as gene, protein or disease names along with their synonymic information. Conceptually identical domain-specific terms are regarded as one term, and then conceptually identical abbreviation-long form pairs are grouped taking into account their appearance in MEDLINE. To keep up with new abbreviations that are continuously introduced, Allie has an automatic update system. In addition, the database of abbreviations and their long forms with their corresponding PubMed IDs is constructed and updated weekly.
Database URL: The Allie service is available at http://allie.dbcls.jp/.
doi:10.1093/database/bar013
PMCID: PMC3077826  PMID: 21498548
7.  Id4, a New Candidate Gene for Senile Osteoporosis, Acts as a Molecular Switch Promoting Osteoblast Differentiation 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(7):e1001019.
Excessive accumulation of bone marrow adipocytes observed in senile osteoporosis or age-related osteopenia is caused by the unbalanced differentiation of MSCs into bone marrow adipocytes or osteoblasts. Several transcription factors are known to regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow have yet to be elucidated. To identify candidate genes associated with senile osteoporosis, we performed genome-wide expression analyses of differentiating osteoblasts and adipocytes. Among transcription factors that were enriched in the early phase of differentiation, Id4 was identified as a key molecule affecting the differentiation of both cell types. Experiments using bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2 and Id4-deficient mice showed that lack of Id4 drastically reduces osteoblast differentiation and drives differentiation toward adipocytes. On the other hand knockdown of Id4 in adipogenic-induced ST2 cells increased the expression of Pparγ2, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Similar results were observed in bone marrow cells of femur and tibia of Id4-deficient mice. However the effect of Id4 on Pparγ2 and adipocyte differentiation is unlikely to be of direct nature. The mechanism of Id4 promoting osteoblast differentiation is associated with the Id4-mediated release of Hes1 from Hes1-Hey2 complexes. Hes1 increases the stability and transcriptional activity of Runx2, a key molecule of osteoblast differentiation, which results in an enhanced osteoblast-specific gene expression. The new role of Id4 in promoting osteoblast differentiation renders it a target for preventing the onset of senile osteoporosis.
Author Summary
Increased bone marrow adiposity is observed in the bone marrow of senile osteoporosis patients. This is caused by unbalanced differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into osteoblast or adipocyte. Previous reports have indicated that several transcription factors play important roles in determining the direction of MSCs differentiation into osteoblast or adipocyte. So far, little is known about the overall dynamics and regulation of transcription factor expression changes leading to the imbalance of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation inside the bone marrow. We have performed genome-wide gene expression analyses during the differentiation of MSCs into osteoblast or adipocyte. We identified basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family member Id4 as a leading candidate controlling the differentiation toward adipocyte or osteoblast. Suppression of Id4 expression in MSCs repressed osteoblast differentiation and increased adipocyte differentiation. In contrast, overexpression of Id4 in MSCs promoted osteoblast differentiation and attenuated adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, Id4-mutant mice showed abnormal accumulation of lipid droplets in bone marrow and impaired bone formation activity. In summary, we have demonstrated a molecular function of Id4 in osteoblast differentiation. The findings revealed that Id4 is a molecular switch enhancing osteoblast differentiation at the expense of adipocyte differentiation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001019
PMCID: PMC2900302  PMID: 20628571
8.  Gendoo: Functional profiling of gene and disease features using MeSH vocabulary 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;37(Web Server issue):W166-W169.
Genome-wide data enables us to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of complex phenotypes. The Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a widely employed knowledge base of human genes and genetic disorders for biological researchers. However, OMIM has not been fully exploited for omics analysis because its bibliographic data structure is not suitable for computer automation. Here, we characterized diseases and genes by generating feature profiles of associated drugs, biological phenomena and anatomy with the MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) vocabulary. We obtained 1 760 054 pairs of OMIM entries and MeSH terms by utilizing the full set of MEDLINE articles. We developed a web-based application called Gendoo (gene, disease features ontology-based overview system) to visualize these profiles. By comparing feature profiles of types 1 and 2 diabetes, we clearly illustrated their differences: type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease (P-value = 4.55 × 10−5) and type 2 diabetes is related to obesity (P-value = 1.18 × 10−15). Gendoo and the developed feature profiles should be useful for omics analysis from molecular and clinical viewpoints. Gendoo is available at http://gendoo.dbcls.jp/.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp483
PMCID: PMC2703956  PMID: 19498079
9.  FANTOM DB: database of Functional Annotation of RIKEN Mouse cDNA Clones 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):116-118.
FANTOM DB, the database of Functional Annotation of RIKEN Mouse cDNA Clones, is designed to store sequence information of RIKEN full-length enriched mouse cDNA clones, graphical views of sequence analysis results, curated functional annotation information and additional descriptions, including Gene Ontology terms. RIKEN’s Mouse Gene Encyclopedia Project aims to collect full-length enriched cDNA clones from various mouse tissues, determine the full-length nucleotide sequences, infer their chromosomal locations by computer and characterize gene expression patterns. FANTOM DB has been developed to facilitate this work and to facilitate functional genomic studies such as positional candidate cloning, cDNA microarrays and protein interaction analyses. FANTOM DB contains 21 076 full-length cDNA sequences with rich functional annotations and is publicly available. FANTOM DB thus provides curated functional annotation to RIKEN full-length enriched mouse clones, and has links to other public resources. FANTOM DB can be accessed at http://fantom.gsc.riken.go.jp/db/.
PMCID: PMC99137  PMID: 11752270
10.  READ: RIKEN Expression Array Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):211-213.
READ, the RIKEN Expression Array Database, is a database of expression profile data from the RIKEN mouse cDNA microarray. It stores the microarray experimental data and information, and provides Web interfaces for researchers to use to retrieve, analyze and display their data. The goals for READ are to serve as a storage site for microarray data from ongoing research in the RIKEN mouse encyclopedia project and to provide useful links and tools to decipher biologically important information. The gene information is based mainly on the fully annotated FANTOM database. READ can be accessed at http://read.gsc.riken.go.jp/. READ also provides a search tool [READ integrates gene expression neighbor (RINGENE)] for genes with similarities in expression profiling.
PMCID: PMC99103  PMID: 11752296
11.  Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones 
Imanishi, Tadashi | Itoh, Takeshi | Suzuki, Yutaka | O'Donovan, Claire | Fukuchi, Satoshi | Koyanagi, Kanako O | Barrero, Roberto A | Tamura, Takuro | Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi | Tanino, Motohiko | Yura, Kei | Miyazaki, Satoru | Ikeo, Kazuho | Homma, Keiichi | Kasprzyk, Arek | Nishikawa, Tetsuo | Hirakawa, Mika | Thierry-Mieg, Jean | Thierry-Mieg, Danielle | Ashurst, Jennifer | Jia, Libin | Nakao, Mitsuteru | Thomas, Michael A | Mulder, Nicola | Karavidopoulou, Youla | Jin, Lihua | Kim, Sangsoo | Yasuda, Tomohiro | Lenhard, Boris | Eveno, Eric | Suzuki, Yoshiyuki | Yamasaki, Chisato | Takeda, Jun-ichi | Gough, Craig | Hilton, Phillip | Fujii, Yasuyuki | Sakai, Hiroaki | Tanaka, Susumu | Amid, Clara | Bellgard, Matthew | de Fatima Bonaldo, Maria | Bono, Hidemasa | Bromberg, Susan K | Brookes, Anthony J | Bruford, Elspeth | Carninci, Piero | Chelala, Claude | Couillault, Christine | de Souza, Sandro J. | Debily, Marie-Anne | Devignes, Marie-Dominique | Dubchak, Inna | Endo, Toshinori | Estreicher, Anne | Eyras, Eduardo | Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru | R. Gopinath, Gopal | Graudens, Esther | Hahn, Yoonsoo | Han, Michael | Han, Ze-Guang | Hanada, Kousuke | Hanaoka, Hideki | Harada, Erimi | Hashimoto, Katsuyuki | Hinz, Ursula | Hirai, Momoki | Hishiki, Teruyoshi | Hopkinson, Ian | Imbeaud, Sandrine | Inoko, Hidetoshi | Kanapin, Alexander | Kaneko, Yayoi | Kasukawa, Takeya | Kelso, Janet | Kersey, Paul | Kikuno, Reiko | Kimura, Kouichi | Korn, Bernhard | Kuryshev, Vladimir | Makalowska, Izabela | Makino, Takashi | Mano, Shuhei | Mariage-Samson, Regine | Mashima, Jun | Matsuda, Hideo | Mewes, Hans-Werner | Minoshima, Shinsei | Nagai, Keiichi | Nagasaki, Hideki | Nagata, Naoki | Nigam, Rajni | Ogasawara, Osamu | Ohara, Osamu | Ohtsubo, Masafumi | Okada, Norihiro | Okido, Toshihisa | Oota, Satoshi | Ota, Motonori | Ota, Toshio | Otsuki, Tetsuji | Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique | Poustka, Annemarie | Ren, Shuang-Xi | Saitou, Naruya | Sakai, Katsunaga | Sakamoto, Shigetaka | Sakate, Ryuichi | Schupp, Ingo | Servant, Florence | Sherry, Stephen | Shiba, Rie | Shimizu, Nobuyoshi | Shimoyama, Mary | Simpson, Andrew J | Soares, Bento | Steward, Charles | Suwa, Makiko | Suzuki, Mami | Takahashi, Aiko | Tamiya, Gen | Tanaka, Hiroshi | Taylor, Todd | Terwilliger, Joseph D | Unneberg, Per | Veeramachaneni, Vamsi | Watanabe, Shinya | Wilming, Laurens | Yasuda, Norikazu | Yoo, Hyang-Sook | Stodolsky, Marvin | Makalowski, Wojciech | Go, Mitiko | Nakai, Kenta | Takagi, Toshihisa | Kanehisa, Minoru | Sakaki, Yoshiyuki | Quackenbush, John | Okazaki, Yasushi | Hayashizaki, Yoshihide | Hide, Winston | Chakraborty, Ranajit | Nishikawa, Ken | Sugawara, Hideaki | Tateno, Yoshio | Chen, Zhu | Oishi, Michio | Tonellato, Peter | Apweiler, Rolf | Okubo, Kousaku | Wagner, Lukas | Wiemann, Stefan | Strausberg, Robert L | Isogai, Takao | Auffray, Charles | Nomura, Nobuo | Gojobori, Takashi | Sugano, Sumio
PLoS Biology  2004;2(6):e162.
The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In addition, among 72,027 uniquely mapped SNPs and insertions/deletions localized within human genes, 13,215 nonsynonymous SNPs, 315 nonsense SNPs, and 452 indels occurred in coding regions. Together with 25 polymorphic microsatellite repeats present in coding regions, they may alter protein structure, causing phenotypic effects or resulting in disease. The H-InvDB platform represents a substantial contribution to resources needed for the exploration of human biology and pathology.
An international team has systematically validated and annotated just over 21,000 human genes using full-length cDNA, thereby providing a valuable new resource for the human genetics community
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0020162
PMCID: PMC393292  PMID: 15103394

Results 1-11 (11)