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1.  Thin-section CT findings in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1020):1533-1538.
Objective
The aim of this study was to assess clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) pulmonary infection.
Methods
We retrospectively identified 44 patients with acute PA pneumonia who had undergone chest thin-section CT examinations between January 2004 and December 2010. We excluded nine patients with concurrent infections. The final study group comprised 35 patients (21 males, 14 females; age range 30–89 years, mean age 66.9 years) with PA pneumonia. The patients' clinical findings were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion were evaluated on thin-section CT.
Results
Underlying diseases included malignancy (n=13), a smoking habit (n=11) and cardiac disease (n=8). CT scans of all patients revealed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (n=34), bronchial wall thickening (n=31), consolidation (n=23) and cavities (n=5). Pleural effusion was found in 15 patients.
Conclusion
PA pulmonary infection was observed in patients with underlying diseases such as malignancy or a smoking habit. The CT findings in patients with PA consisted mainly of ground-glass attenuation and bronchial wall thickening.
Advances in knowledge
The CT findings consisted mainly of ground-glass attenuation, bronchial wall thickening and cavities. These findings in patients with an underlying disease such as malignancy or a smoking habit may be suggestive of pneumonia caused by PA infection.
doi:10.1259/bjr/54468236
PMCID: PMC3611710  PMID: 22844034
2.  Thin-section CT findings of patients with acute Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia with and without concurrent infection 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1016):e357-e364.
Objectives
The aim of this study was to compare the pulmonary thin-section CT findings of patients with acute Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia with and without concurrent infection.
Methods
The study group comprised 86 patients with acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia, 36 patients with S. pneumoniae pneumonia combined with Haemophilus influenzae infection, 26 patients with S. pneumoniae pneumonia combined with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and 22 patients with S. pneumoniae pneumonia combined with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. We compared the thin-section CT findings among the groups.
Results
Centrilobular nodules and bronchial wall thickening were significantly more frequent in patients with pneumonia caused by concurrent infection (H. influenzae: p<0.001 and p<0.001, P. aeruginosa: p<0.001 and p<0.001, MSSA: p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) than in those infected with S. pneumoniae alone. Cavity and bilateral pleural effusions were significantly more frequent in cases of S. pneumoniae pneumonia with concurrent P. aeruginosa infection than in cases of S. pneumoniae pneumonia alone (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) or with concurrent H. influenzae (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) or MSSA infection (p<0.05 and p<0.05, respectively).
Conclusions
When a patient with S. pneumoniae pneumonia has centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening, cavity or bilateral pleural effusions on CT images, concurrent infection should be considered.
doi:10.1259/bjr/18544730
PMCID: PMC3587092  PMID: 22215884
3.  Thoracic duct and cisterna chyli: evaluation with multidetector row CT 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1016):1052-1058.
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the normal anatomy of the thoracic duct and cisterna chyli obtained by axial and multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 1 mm slice thickness using multidetector row CT (MDCT).
Methods
We evaluated the ability of MDCT to examine the normal anatomy of the thoracic duct and cisterna chyli. The axial and coronal images of thoracoabdominal MDCT images obtained in 50 patients (20 females and 30 males; mean age, 63.5 years; range, 32–81 years) were reviewed between January and October 2005. We excluded patients with malignant neoplasms, inflammation or vascular diseases (e.g. aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection) and those with a history of thoracoabdominal surgery. The thoracic duct was divided into three anatomical sections: the upper, middle and lower. We evaluated the degree of visualisation and the maximum size of the thoracic duct. We also evaluated the degree of visualisation, maximum size, configuration and location of the cisterna chyli.
Results
Visualisation of the thoracic duct and cisterna chyli was almost 100% on axial and coronal images. The lower section of the thoracic duct was most clearly visualised among the three sections. There was little difference in the maximum size of the thoracic duct among the three sections. The cisterna chyli was most frequently located at the Th12 or L1 level, and the most common type was the “straight thin tube type”.
Conclusion
Axial and MPR images of 1 mm slice thickness using MDCT can clearly depict the thoracic duct and cisterna chyli.
doi:10.1259/bjr/19379150
PMCID: PMC3587101  PMID: 22253338
4.  Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and meticillin-susceptible S. aureus pneumonia: comparison of clinical and thin-section CT findings 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1014):e168-e175.
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and thin-section CT findings in patients with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA).
Methods
We retrospectively identified 201 patients with acute MRSA pneumonia and 164 patients with acute MSSA pneumonia who had undergone chest thin-section CT examinations between January 2004 and March 2009. Patients with concurrent infectious disease were excluded from our study. Consequently, our study group comprised 68 patients with MRSA pneumonia (37 male, 31 female) and 83 patients with MSSA pneumonia (32 male, 51 female). Clinical findings in the patients were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities, lymph node enlargement and pleural effusion were assessed.
Results
Underlying diseases such as cardiovascular were significantly more frequent in the patients with MRSA pneumonia than in those with MSSA pneumonia. CT findings of centrilobular nodules, centrilobular nodules with a tree-in-bud pattern, and bronchial wall thickening were significantly more frequent in the patients with MSSA pneumonia than those with MRSA pneumonia (p=0.038, p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). In the group with MRSA, parenchymal abnormalities were observed to be mainly peripherally distributed and the frequency was significantly higher than in the MSSA group (p=0.028). Pleural effusion was significantly more frequent in the patients with MRSA pneumonia than those with MSSA pneumonia (p=0.002).
Conclusions
Findings from the evaluation of thin-section CT manifestations of pneumonia may be useful to distinguish between patients with acute MRSA pneumonia and those with MSSA pneumonia.
doi:10.1259/bjr/65538472
PMCID: PMC3474104  PMID: 21750126
5.  Radiological findings in acute Haemophilus influenzae pulmonary infection 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1010):121-126.
Objective
The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Haemophilus influenzae pulmonary infection.
Methods
Thin-section CT scans obtained between January 2004 and March 2009 from 434 patients with acute H. influenzae pulmonary infection were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with concurrent infection diseases, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=76), Staphylococcus aureus (n=58) or multiple pathogens (n=89) were excluded from this study. Thus, our study group comprised 211 patients (106 men, 105 women; age range, 16–91 years, mean, 63.9 years). Underlying diseases included cardiac disease (n=35), pulmonary emphysema (n=23), post-operative status for malignancy (n=20) and bronchial asthma (n=15). Frequencies of CT patterns and disease distribution of parenchymal abnormalities, lymph node enlargement and pleural effusion were assessed by thin-section CT.
Results
The CT findings in patients with H. influenzae pulmonary infection consisted mainly of ground-glass opacity (n=185), bronchial wall thickening (n=181), centrilobular nodules (n=137) and consolidation (n=112). These abnormalities were predominantly seen in the peripheral lung parenchyma (n=108). Pleural effusion was found in 22 patients. Two patients had mediastinal lymph node enlargement.
Conclusion
These findings in elderly patients with smoking habits or cardiac disease may be characteristic CT findings of H. influenzae pulmonary infection.
doi:10.1259/bjr/48077494
PMCID: PMC3473957  PMID: 21224303
6.  Pulmonary thin-section CT findings in acute Moraxella catarrhalis pulmonary infection 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(1008):1109-1114.
Objective
Moraxella catarrhalis is an important pathogen in the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection.
Methods
Thin-section CT scans obtained between January 2004 and March 2009 from 292 patients with acute M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical and pulmonary CT findings in the patients were assessed. Patients with concurrent infection including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 72), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 61) or multiple pathogens were excluded from this study.
Results
The study group comprised 109 patients (66 male, 43 female; age range 28–102 years; mean age 74.9 years). Among the 109 patients, 34 had community-acquired and 75 had nosocomial infections. Underlying diseases included pulmonary emphysema (n = 74), cardiovascular disease (n = 44) or malignant disease (n = 41). Abnormal findings were seen on CT scans in all patients and included ground-glass opacity (n = 99), bronchial wall thickening (n = 85) and centrilobular nodules (n = 79). These abnormalities were predominantly seen in the peripheral lung parenchyma (n = 99). Pleural effusion was found in eight patients. No patients had mediastinal and/or hilar lymph node enlargement.
Conclusions
M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection was observed in elderly patients, often in combination with pulmonary emphysema. CT manifestations of infection were mainly ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening and centilobular nodules.
doi:10.1259/bjr/42762966
PMCID: PMC3473838  PMID: 21123308
7.  Comparison of pulmonary thin section CT findings and serum KL-6 levels in patients with sarcoidosis 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(999):229-235.
Objective
This study aimed to compare thin-section CT images from sarcoidosis patients who had either normal or elevated serum KL-6 levels.
Methods
101 patients with sarcoidosis who underwent thin-section CT examinations of the chest and serum KL-6 measurements between December 2003 and November 2008 were retrospectively identified. The study group comprised 75 sarcoidosis patients (23 male, 52 female; aged 19–82 years, mean 54.1 years) with normal KL-6 levels (152–499 U ml–1, mean 305.7 U ml–1) and 26 sarcoidosis patients (7 male, 19 female; aged 19–75 years, mean 54.3 years) with elevated KL-6 levels (541–2940 U ml–1, mean 802.4 U ml–1). Two chest radiologists, unaware of KL-6 levels, retrospectively and independently interpreted CT images for parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion.
Results
CT findings in sarcoidosis patients consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement (70/75 with normal KL-6 levels and 21/26 with elevated KL-6 levels), followed by nodules (50 and 25 with normal and elevated levels, respectively) and bronchial wall thickening (25 and 21 with normal and elevated levels, respectively). Ground-glass opacity, nodules, interlobular septal thickening, traction bronchiectasis, architectural distortion and bronchial wall thickening were significantly more frequent in patients with elevated KL-6 levels than those with normal levels (p<0.001, p<0.005, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). By comparison, there was no significant difference in frequency of lymph node enlargement between the two groups.
Conclusion
These results suggest that serum KL-6 levels may be a useful marker for indicating the severity of parenchymal sarcoidosis.
doi:10.1259/bjr/65287605
PMCID: PMC3473878  PMID: 21045068
8.  Localised right upper-lobe pulmonary oedema caused by extension of giant cell carcinoma to the mitral valve 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(997):e004-e006.
Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a very rare primary malignant tumour and localised right upper-lobe pulmonary oedema is also unusual. We report a case of giant cell carcinoma, which invaded the left atrium through the left pulmonary vein and caused localised right upper-lobe pulmonary oedema.
doi:10.1259/bjr/29189288
PMCID: PMC3473816  PMID: 21172960
9.  A case of pneumonitis and encephalitis associated with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection after bone marrow transplantation 
The British Journal of Radiology  2010;83(996):e255-e258.
Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-associated encephalitis or pneumonitis has been reported in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. Several MRI studies in patients with HHV-6-associated encephalitis have been presented. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies describing thin-section CT imaging in patients with HHV-6-associated pneumonitis have been reported. Here we describe a case of HHV-6-associated encephalitis and pneumonitis that developed after bone marrow transplantation. Thin-section CT images of the chest revealed ground-glass attenuation, consolidation and centrilobular nodules in both lungs.
doi:10.1259/bjr/19375793
PMCID: PMC3473609  PMID: 21088083
10.  Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia alone and with concurrent infection: comparison of clinical and thin-section CT findings 
The British Journal of Radiology  2010;83(994):854-860.
The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical and thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia (KPP) alone and with concurrent infection. We retrospectively identified 160 patients with acute KPP who underwent chest thin-section CT examinations between August 1998 and August 2008 at our institution. The study group comprised 80 patients (54 male, 26 female; age range 18–97 years, mean age 61.5) with acute KPP alone, 55 (43 male, 12 female; age range 46–92 years, mean age 76.0) with KPP combined with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 25 (23 male, 2 female; age range 56–91 years, mean age 72.7) with KPP combined with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Underlying diseases in patients with each type of pneumonia were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities were evaluated along with enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion. In patients with concurrent pneumonia, underlying conditions such as cardiac diseases, diabetes mellitus and malignancy were significantly more frequent than in patients with KPP alone. The mortality rate in patients with KPP combined with MRSA or PA was significantly higher than in those with KPP alone. In concurrent KPP, CT findings of centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening, cavity, bronchiectasis, nodules and pleural effusion were significantly more frequent with concurrent pneumonia than in those with KPP alone.
doi:10.1259/bjr/28999734
PMCID: PMC3473742  PMID: 20647513
11.  Prevention of inflammation-mediated acquisition of metastatic properties of benign mouse fibrosarcoma cells by administration of an orally available superoxide dismutase 
British Journal of Cancer  2006;94(6):854-862.
Weakly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 cells derived from a fibrosarcoma in C57BL6 mouse are converted to malignant cells once they have grown after being coimplanted with a gelatine sponge which induces inflammation. We administered a newly developed peroral superoxide dismutase (SOD), oxykine, and as control vehicle, gliadin and saline, starting 2 days before the coimplantation and continued daily throughout the experiment. In the oxykine group, tumour incidence was lower (41%) than in the gliadin or saline group (83 and 79%, respectively). The inhibitory effect of oxykine was lost when an individual component of oxykine was administered, that is, SOD alone and gliadin alone. The effect was also abolished when administered by intraperitoneal route. When perfused in situ with nitroblue tetrazolium, an indicator of superoxide formation, the tumour masses from gliadin and saline groups displayed intense formazan deposition, whereas, those from oxykine group had less deposition. Enzymatic activity of SOD was also increased in oxykine group. Arising tumour cells in gliadin and saline groups acquired metastatic phenotype, but those in oxykine group showed reduced metastatic ability. These results suggested that the orally active SOD derivative prevented tumour progression promoted by inflammation, which is thought to be through scavenging inflammatory cell-derived superoxide anion.
doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6603016
PMCID: PMC2361372  PMID: 16508635
orally available superoxide dismutase; metastasis; inflammation-mediated tumour progression; fibrosarcoma cells
12.  Increased pre-therapeutic serum vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with early clinical relapse of osteosarcoma 
British Journal of Cancer  2002;86(6):864-869.
To investigate the clinical significance of circulating angiogenic factors, especially in association with early relapse of osteosarcoma, we quantified pre-therapeutic levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and placenta growth factor in the sera of 16 patients with osteosarcoma using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After a 1-year follow-up, the serum level of angiogenic factors was analysed with respect to microvessel density of the biopsy specimen and clinical disease relapse. The serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were positively correlated with the microvessel density with statistical significance (P=0.004; Spearman rank correlation) and also significantly higher in seven patients who developed pulmonary metastasis than the remaining nine patients without detectable disease relapse (P=0.0009; The Mann–Whitney U-test). In contrast, the serum levels of basic fibroblast growth factor or placenta growth factor failed to show significant correlation with the microvessel density or relapse of the disease. Although there was no significant correlation between serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels and the tumour volume, the serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly higher in patients with a vascular endothelial growth factor-positive tumour than those with a vascular endothelial growth factor-negative tumour. These findings suggest that the pre-therapeutic serum vascular endothelial growth factor level reflects the angiogenic property of primary tumour and may have a predictive value on early disease relapse of osteosarcoma.
British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 864–869. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600201 www.bjcancer.com
© 2002 Cancer Research UK
doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600201
PMCID: PMC2364146  PMID: 11953816
osteosarcoma; pulmonary metastasis; angiogenesis; VEGF
13.  Localized near-infrared spectroscopy and functional optical imaging of brain activity. 
Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rates (CMRO2) have been used as indices for changes in neuronal activity. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can also measure cerebral haemodynamics and metabolic changes, enabling the possible use of multichannel recording of NIRS for functional optical imaging of human brain activity. Spatio-temporal variations of brain regions were demonstrated during various mental tasks. Non-synchronous behaviour of cerebral haemodynamics during the neuronal activation was observed. Gender- and handedness-dependent lateralization of the function between right and left hemispheres was demonstrated by simultaneous measurement using two NIR instruments during the mirror-drawing task. A lack of interhemispheric integration was observed with schizophrenic patients. These observations suggest an application for NIRS in psychiatric disease management, as an addition to clinical monitoring at the bedside. A time resolved 64-channel optical imaging system was constructed. This consisted of three picosecond laser diodes and 64 channels of TAC and CFD systems. Image reconstruction for phantom model systems was performed. Time-resolved quantitative optical imaging will become real in the very near future.
PMCID: PMC1691956  PMID: 9232862
14.  Establishing a link between oncogenes and tumor angiogenesis. 
Molecular Medicine  1998;4(5):286-295.
We have tried to stress that mutant oncogenes or overexpressed, nonmutated proto-oncogenes, in addition to their direct affect on promoting aberrant tumor cell proliferation (and survival), may possess a crucial indirect means of stimulating tumor cell growth through regulation of angiogenesis. This effect would never be observed in tissue culture studies of oncogene function using pure cultures of tumor cells, which probably helps explain why the pro-angiogenic function of oncogenes has not been appreciated until only relatively recently. Indeed, the very first indication of a possible contributory role of oncogenes, such as ras and myc, to tumor angiogenesis was first reported by Thompson et al. in 1989, who used reconstituted organ cultures of the mouse prostate gland for their studies (69). This potentially important contribution of oncogenes to tumor growth and development may prove to have an impact on how various signal transduction inhibitors that are now in early phase clinical trials, e.g., monoclonal neutralizing antibodies to the human EGF receptor (70), function in vivo as anti-tumor agents.
Images
PMCID: PMC2230380  PMID: 9642680
15.  Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) produced in tumour tissue after chemotherapy acts as a lymphokine-activated killer attractant. 
British Journal of Cancer  1996;74(2):274-279.
Using an under agarose migration (UAM) assay, we studied lymphokine-activated killer (LAK)-attractant activity in cultured conditioned medium of tumour tissues after chemotherapy as a possible mechanism of enhanced LAK cell accumulation into tumour tissues after chemotherapy. BMT-11 is a fibrosarcoma developed in C57BL/6 mice. The conditioned medium of BMT-11 tumour tissues obtained from mice treated with various anti-cancer drugs had chemotactic activity for LAK cells (LAK-attractant activity). mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-6, IL-8, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was observed in untreated tumour tissues, which were not enhanced by cyclophosphamide treatment. mRNA expression of TGF-beta 1 was not detected in untreated tumour tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), but was detected in tumour tissues treated with cyclophosphamide. Recombinant human TGF-beta 1 showed LAK-attractant activity at a concentration of 0.1 ng ml-1 and 1 ng ml-1, whereas fresh splenocytes were not attracted by TGF-beta 1. Anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody inhibited LAK-attractant activity in the conditioned medium of tumour tissues treated with cyclophosphamide to approximately 35% that of control at 100 micrograms ml-1. These findings indicate that TGF-beta 1 produced in the tumour tissues of mice treated with anti-cancer drugs could be a LAK attractant. By a 4 h 51Cr release assay of natural killer cell-resistant BMT-11 tumour cells, we observed that TGF-beta 1 at a concentration from 0.01 ng ml-1 to 10 ng ml-1 did not inhibit LAK activity in an effector phase. Taken together, we suggest that TGF-beta 1 produced in tumour tissues after chemotherapy participates in gathering transferred LAK cells and contributes to the therapeutic effects of transferred LAK cells.
Images
PMCID: PMC2074585  PMID: 8688335
16.  Enhancement of in vitro prostaglandin E2 production by mouse fibrosarcoma cells after co-culture with various anti-tumour effector cells. 
British Journal of Cancer  1994;70(2):233-238.
We have previously reported that an increase in the production of immunosuppressive prostaglandin E2 by a QR tumour (QR-32) is accompanied by progressive growth of the tumour in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. In order to determine what kinds of cell and factor(s) enable QR-32 cells to promote PGE2 production, we investigated the amounts of PGE2 in the supernatant of QR-32 cells by co-culturing them with various anti-tumour effector cells. Significantly high levels of PGE2 production were observed when the QR-32 cells were co-cultured with lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, natural killer (NK) cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes and streptococcal preparation (OK432)-activated or resident peritoneal macrophages (activated and resident macrophages). On the other hand, PGE2 production was not increased when QR-32 cells were co-cultured with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific to QR-32 cells. The high levels of PGE2 production were partially or totally inhibited by the presence of radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and mannitol, although the cytotoxicity of LAK cells was not. We also exposed QR-32 cells to human recombinant cytokines and the growth factors which are produced when anti-tumour effector cells come in contact with tumour cells. Significant PGE2 production by QR-32 cells was observed when the cells were treated with interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) (all P < 0.001). These results suggest that oxygen radicals produced by anti-tumour effector cells and inflammatory cytokines provoke QR-32 cells to produce large amounts of immunosuppressive PGE2.
PMCID: PMC2033504  PMID: 8054271
17.  Malignant progression of a mouse fibrosarcoma by host cells reactive to a foreign body (gelatin sponge). 
British Journal of Cancer  1992;66(4):635-639.
The QR regressor tumour (QR-32), a fibrosarcoma which is unable to grow progressively in normal syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, was able to grow progressively in 13 out of 22 mice (59%) when it was subcutaneously coimplanted with gelatin sponge. We established four culture tumour lines from the resultant tumours (QRsP tumour lines). These QRsP tumour lines were able to grow progressively in mice even in the absence of gelatin sponge. The ability of QRsP tumour cells to colonise the lungs after intravenous injection and to produce high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) during in vitro cell culture was much greater than that of parent QR-32 cells. These biological characteristics of QR-32 cells and QRsP tumour cells were found to be stable for at least 6 months when they were maintained in culture. We also observed that QR-32 cells were able to grow progressively in five out of 12 (42%) mice after coimplantation with plastic non-adherent peritoneal cells obtained from mice which had been intraperitoneally implanted with gelatin sponge. These host cells reactive to gelatin sponge increased the production of high amounts of PGE2 by QR-32 cells during 48 h coculture. Preliminary in vitro studies implicated the involvement of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical as some of the factors necessary to induce QR-32 cells to produce high amounts of PGE2 and to accelerate tumour progression.
PMCID: PMC1977431  PMID: 1419599

Results 1-17 (17)