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author:("Tan, H stevia")
1.  Vitreous TIMP-1 levels associate with neovascularization and TGF-β2 levels but not with fibrosis in the clinical course of proliferative diabetic retinopathy 
In proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor; CTGF) cause blindness by neovascularization and subsequent fibrosis. This angio-fibrotic switch is associated with a shift in the balance between vitreous levels of CCN2 and VEGF in the eye. Here, we investigated the possible involvement of other important mediators of fibrosis, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, and of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, in the natural course of PDR. TIMP-1, activated TGF-β2, CCN2 and VEGF levels were measured by ELISA in 78 vitreous samples of patients with PDR (n = 28), diabetic patients without PDR (n = 24), and patients with the diabetes-unrelated retinal conditions macular hole (n = 10) or macular pucker (n = 16), and were related to MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity on zymograms and to clinical data, including degree of intra-ocular neovascularization and fibrosis. TIMP-1, CCN2 and VEGF levels, but not activated TGF-β2 levels, were significantly increased in the vitreous of diabetic patients, with the highest levels in PDR patients. CCN2 and the CCN2/VEGF ratio were the strongest predictors of degree of fibrosis. In diabetic patients with or without PDR, activated TGF-β2 levels correlated with TIMP-1 levels, whereas in PDR patients, TIMP-1 levels, MMP-2 and proMMP-9 were associated with degree of neovascularization, like VEGF levels, but not with fibrosis. We confirm here our previous findings that retinal fibrosis in PDR patients is significantly correlated with vitreous CCN2 levels and the CCN2/VEGF ratio. In contrast, TIMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 appear to have a role in the angiogenic phase rather than in the fibrotic phase of PDR.
doi:10.1007/s12079-012-0178-y
PMCID: PMC3590360  PMID: 23054594
Diabetic retinopathy; CCN2; VEGF; TGF-β; TIMP-1; MMP-2; MMP-9; Neovascularization; Fibrosis
2.  Pars plana vitrectomy for the repair of primary, inferior rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated to inferior breaks. A comparison of a 25-gauge versus a 20-gauge system 
Background
To compare anatomical, functional outcomes and complications of high-speed 25-gauge (G) pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) versus 20-G PPV for the management of primary inferior rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) associated to inferior breaks/holes.
Methods
Eighty-five eyes from 85 patients with a minimum follow-up of 3 months were retrospectively evaluated. Forty-one patients underwent 25-G and 44 patients underwent 20-G PPV. All patients underwent PPV with fluid-air exchange, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) 20 % gas tamponade and laser or cryo retinopexy.
Results
The mean follow-up interval was 6.51(±2.32) and 6.63 (±2.58) months in the 25-G and 20-G groups respectively. Single-operation success rate was 92.7 % for the 25-G group and 81.8 % for the 20-G group (P = 0.24). Post-operative hypotony was observed in no case. Redetachment occurred in 3 eyes operated on with 25-G and in 8 eyes operated on with 20-G system. All retinas were attached at final follow-up. Logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity significantly improved from 0.69 ± 0.76 to 0.33 ± 0.37 in the 25-G and from 0.47 ± 0.59 to 0.21 ± 0.28 in the 20-G group (P = 0.0007 and P < 0.0001 respectively).
Conclusions
High-speed PPV and SF6 gas tamponade using either 25-G or 20-G PPV system, yields similar single operation anatomical success rates for the repair of uncomplicated, primary inferior RRDs associated to inferior breaks.
doi:10.1007/s00417-012-2059-8
PMCID: PMC3565081  PMID: 22588289
Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment; Small-gauge vitrectomy; Inferior breaks; Sulfur hexafluoride
3.  A shift in the balance of vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor by bevacizumab causes the angiofibrotic switch in proliferative diabetic retinopathy 
Introduction
In proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) may cause blindness by neovascularisation followed by fibrosis of the retina. It has previously been shown that a shift in the balance between levels of CTGF and VEGF in the eye is associated with this angiofibrotic switch. This study investigated whether anti-VEGF agents induce accelerated fibrosis in patients with PDR, as predicted by this model.
Methods
CTGF and VEGF levels were measured by ELISA in 52 vitreous samples of PDR patients, of which 24 patients had received intravitreal bevacizumab 1 week to 3 months before vitrectomy, and were correlated with the degree of vitreoretinal fibrosis as determined clinically and intra-operatively.
Results
CTGF correlated positively, and VEGF correlated negatively with the degree of fibrosis. The CTGF/VEGF ratio was the strongest predictor of fibrosis. Clinically, increased fibrosis was observed after intravitreal bevacizumab.
Conclusions
These results confirm that the CTGF/VEGF ratio is a strong predictor of vitreoretinal fibrosis in PDR, and show that intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment causes increased fibrosis in PDR patients. These findings provide strong support for the model that the balance of CTGF and VEGF determines the angiofibrotic switch, and identify CTGF as a possible therapeutic target in the clinical management of PDR.
doi:10.1136/bjophthalmol-2011-301005
PMCID: PMC3308470  PMID: 22289291
Angiogenesis; choroid; CTGF; diabetic retinopathy; drugs; fibrosis; imaging; macula; retina; VEGF; vitreous

Results 1-3 (3)