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1.  Fundus autofluorescence features in the inflammatory maculopathies 
Purpose
To describe the fundus autofluorescence (FAF) features of the inflammatory maculopathies and develop a quantification method for FAF analysis.
Methods
This is a retrospective, consecutive case series of patients with inflammatory maculopathies from two tertiary centers. The clinical findings, demographics, and FAF imaging characteristics were reviewed. Foveal autofluorescence (AF) was analyzed. Median and standard deviation (SD) of foveal AF intensity were measured.
Results
Thirty eyes of 15 patients were evaluated with both qualitative and quantitative FAF analysis. In acute macular neuroretinopathy, the active phase showed foveal hypoautofluorescence, which became hypoautofluorescent with resolution. In acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy, multiple lesions with hypoautofluorescent centers with hyperautofluorescent borders were observed in active disease and became hypoautofluorescent with disease convalescence. In multifocal choroiditis and punctate inner choroiditis, the active hyperautofluorescent lesions progressed to inactive, hypoautofluorescent scars. Active serpiginous choroiditis showed hyperautofluorescent borders adjacent to a helicoid-shaped, hypoautofluorescent scar. Active unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) showed a complex pattern of hypo- and hyperautoflourescence in the macula. The median foveal AF was the greatest in acute macular neuroretinopathy and UAIM among the maculopathies, while the greatest SD of foveal AF intensity was observed in UAIM.
Conclusion
The active phase of the majority of inflammatory maculopathies was characterized by hyperautofluorescent lesions. Increased SD of foveal AF correlated with a mixture of hypo-and hyperautoflourescence. Median and SD may be useful metrics in foveal AF and quantifiable values that may be assessed over time as a disease process evolves. Improvements in quantification methods of FAF imaging may allow us to objectively evaluate posterior uveitis.
doi:10.2147/OPTH.S68446
PMCID: PMC4189704  PMID: 25302012
posterior uveitis; foveal autofluorescence; quantification; fundus autofluorescence imaging
2.  HLA-B27 and Human β2-Microglobulin Affect the Gut Microbiota of Transgenic Rats 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(8):e105684.
The HLA-B27 gene is a major risk factor for clinical diseases including ankylosing spondylitis, acute anterior uveitis, reactive arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis, but its mechanism of risk enhancement is not completely understood. The gut microbiome has recently been shown to influence several HLA-linked diseases. However, the role of HLA-B27 in shaping the gut microbiome has not been previously investigated. In this study, we characterize the differences in the gut microbiota mediated by the presence of the HLA-B27 gene. We identified differences in the cecal microbiota of Lewis rats transgenic for HLA-B27 and human β2-microglobulin (hβ2m), compared with wild-type Lewis rats, using biome representational in situ karyotyping (BRISK) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. 16S sequencing revealed significant differences between transgenic animals and wild type animals by principal coordinates analysis. Further analysis of the data set revealed an increase in Prevotella spp. and a decrease in Rikenellaceae relative abundance in the transgenic animals compared to the wild type animals. By BRISK analysis, species-specific differences included an increase in Bacteroides vulgatus abundance in HLA-B27/hβ2m and hβ2m compared to wild type rats. The finding that HLA-B27 is associated with altered cecal microbiota has not been shown before and can potentially provide a better understanding of the clinical diseases associated with this gene.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0105684
PMCID: PMC4139385  PMID: 25140823
3.  Heritability and Genome-wide Association Study To Assess Genetic Differences Between Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration Subtypes  
Ophthalmology  2012;119(9):1874-1885.
Purpose
To investigate whether the two subtypes of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and geographic atrophy (GA), segregate separately in families and to identify which genetic variants are associated with these two subtypes.
Design
Sibling correlation study and genome-wide association study (GWAS)
Participants
For the sibling correlation study, we included 209 sibling pairs with advanced AMD. For the GWAS, we included 2594 participants with advanced AMD subtypes and 4134 controls. Replication cohorts included 5383 advanced AMD participants and 15,240 controls.
Methods
Participants had AMD grade assigned based on fundus photography and/or examination. To determine heritability of advanced AMD subtypes, we performed a sibling correlation study. For the GWAS, we conducted genome-wide genotyping and imputed 6,036,699 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). We then analyzed SNPs with a generalized linear model controlling for genotyping platform and genetic ancestry. The most significant associations were evaluated in independent cohorts.
Main Outcome Measures
Concordance of advanced AMD subtypes in sibling pairs and associations between SNPs with GA and CNV advanced AMD subtypes.
Results
The difference between the observed and expected proportion of siblings concordant for the same subtype of advanced AMD was different to a statistically significant degree (P=4.2 x 10−5) meaning that siblings of probands with CNV or GA are more likely to develop CNV or GA, respectively. In the analysis comparing participants with CNV to those with GA, we observed a statistically significant association at the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus [rs10490924, odds ratio (OR)=1.47, P=4.3 ×10−9] which was confirmed in the replication samples (OR=1.38, P=7.4 x 10−14 for combined discovery and replication analysis).
Conclusions
Whether a patient with AMD develops CNV vs. GA is determined in part by genetic variation. In this large GWAS meta-analysis and replication analysis, the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus confers increased risk for both advanced AMD subtypes but imparts greater risk for CNV than for GA. This locus explains a small proportion of the excess sibling correlation for advanced AMD subtype. Other loci were detected with suggestive associations which differ for advanced AMD subtypes and deserve follow-up in additional studies.
doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2012.03.014
PMCID: PMC3899891  PMID: 22705344
4.  The effect of genetic variants in SERPING1 on the risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration 
Purpose
Genetic factors influence an individual’s risk for developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of irreversible vision loss. Previous studies investigating the potential association between all AMD subtypes and the SERPING1 gene, which encodes a key regulator of the classical complement pathway, have yielded conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to determine whether variations in SERPING1 are associated with the neovascular form of AMD.
Methods
A total of 556 patients with neovascular AMD and 256 ethnically-matched controls were genotyped for polymorphisms in SERPING1. A tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) approach was used to cover the SERPING1 gene plus 2 kilobases (kb) on each side, spanning the promoter and the 3′ untranslated regions. Ten SNPs with a minimum allele frequency of 0.10 were covered by three tSNPs (rs1005510, rs11603020, rs2511989).
Results
SERPING1 SNPs rs1005510 and rs2511989 were significantly associated with neovascular AMD in our cohort, with rs1005510 conferring an adverse risk effect (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.18–1.88) and rs2511989 conferring a protective effect (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.59–0.90). For both tSNPs, logistic regression of individual genotypes demonstrated statistically-significant stepwise changes in the risk of developing AMD. Combined analysis of rs1005510 with variants in CFH and HTRA1 confirmed an independent risk effect. The rs11603020 variant had no effect on AMD susceptibility in this study (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.78–1.24).
Conclusions
This study comprehensively investigates the SERPING1 gene (using three tSNPs) and evaluates these genetic variants in the largest neovascular AMD cohort to date. Our results support the hypothesis that SERPING1 has a modest effect on the risk of neovascular AMD.
doi:10.1136/bjo.2009.172007
PMCID: PMC3655725  PMID: 20606025
SERPING1; Complement cascade; Age-Related Macular Degeneration; Choroidal Neovascularization
5.  Pharmacogenetics of Complement Factor H (Y402H) and treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration with ranibizumab 
Aims
To determine whether complement factor H (CFH) genotypes have a pharmacogenetic effect on the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with ranibizumab.
Methods
A retrospective study of 156 patients with exudative AMD treated with intravitreal ranibizumab monotherapy was conducted. AMD phenotypes were characterized by clinical examination, visual acuity, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and injection timing. Patients received intravitreal ranibizumab injections as part of routine ophthalmologic care and were followed for a minimum of nine months. Each patient was genotyped for the single nucleotide polymorphism rs1061170 (Y402H) in the CFH gene.
Results
Baseline lesion size and angiographic type, as well as mean visual acuities at baseline, 6 months, and 9 months were similar among the three CFH genotypes. Over 9 months, patients with both risk alleles received approximately one more injection (p = 0.09). In a recurrent event analysis, patients homozygous for the CFH Y402H risk allele had a 37% significantly higher risk of requiring additional ranibizumab injections (p = 0.04)
Conclusions
In our cohort, response to treatment of AMD with ranibizumab differed according to CFH genotype, suggesting that determining patients' CFH genotype may be helpful in the future in tailoring treatment for exudative AMD with intravitreal ranibizumab.
doi:10.1136/bjo.2008.150995
PMCID: PMC3490485  PMID: 19091853
Complement Factor H; Ranibizumab; Age-Related Macular Degeneration; Pharmacogenetics
6.  Common variants near FRK/COL10A1 and VEGFA are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(18):3699-3709.
Despite significant progress in the identification of genetic loci for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), not all of the heritability has been explained. To identify variants which contribute to the remaining genetic susceptibility, we performed the largest meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to date for advanced AMD. We imputed 6 036 699 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with the 1000 Genomes Project reference genotypes on 2594 cases and 4134 controls with follow-up replication of top signals in 5640 cases and 52 174 controls. We identified two new common susceptibility alleles, rs1999930 on 6q21-q22.3 near FRK/COL10A1 [odds ratio (OR) 0.87; P = 1.1 × 10−8] and rs4711751 on 6p12 near VEGFA (OR 1.15; P = 8.7 × 10−9). In addition to the two novel loci, 10 previously reported loci in ARMS2/HTRA1 (rs10490924), CFH (rs1061170, and rs1410996), CFB (rs641153), C3 (rs2230199), C2 (rs9332739), CFI (rs10033900), LIPC (rs10468017), TIMP3 (rs9621532) and CETP (rs3764261) were confirmed with genome-wide significant signals in this large study. Loci in the recently reported genes ABCA1 and COL8A1 were also detected with suggestive evidence of association with advanced AMD. The novel variants identified in this study suggest that angiogenesis (VEGFA) and extracellular collagen matrix (FRK/COL10A1) pathways contribute to the development of advanced AMD.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr270
PMCID: PMC3159552  PMID: 21665990
7.  Polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes and neovascular age-related macular degeneration 
Molecular Vision  2009;15:2710-2719.
Purpose
Genetic factors influence an individual’s risk for developing neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of irreversible blindness. Previous studies on the potential genetic link between AMD and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key regulator of angiogenesis and vascular permeability, have yielded conflicting results. In the present case-control association study, we aimed to determine whether VEGF or its main receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2 is genetically associated with neovascular AMD.
Methods
A total of 515 Caucasian patients with neovascular AMD and 253 ethically-matched controls were genotyped for polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes. A tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (tSNP) approach was employed to cover each gene plus two kilobases on each side, spanning the promoter and 3′ untranslated regions. SNPs with a minimum allele frequency of 10% were covered by seven tSNPs in VEGFA and 20 tSNPs in VEGFR-2. Two VEGFA SNPs previously linked with AMD, rs1413711 and rs3025039, were also analyzed.
Results
The 29 VEGFA and VEGFR-2 SNPs analyzed in our cohort demonstrated no significant association with neovascular AMD. A single rare haplotype in the VEGFR-2 gene was associated with the presence of neovascular AMD (p=0.034).
Conclusions
This study is the first to investigate the association of VEGFR-2 polymorphisms with AMD and evaluates VEGFA genetic variants in the largest neovascular AMD cohort to date. Despite the angiogenic and permeability-enhancing effects of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, we found minimal evidence of a significant link between polymorphisms in the VEGFA and VEGFR-2 genes and neovascular AMD.
PMCID: PMC2793900  PMID: 20019880

Results 1-7 (7)