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1.  Role of histamine in the aetiology of byssinosis. II. Lung histamine concentrations in guinea pigs chronically exposed to cotton and flax dusts. 
Data presented in this study support the finding that cotton and flax dusts contain agents which potentiate the formation or accumulation of histamine or both in the lungs of guinea pigs exposed to dust, and that such agents are present at much higher levels in cotton dust than in flax dust. The potentiating effect may be through the recruitment of mast cells into the lung. Both cotton and flax dusts contain methylating enzyme inhibitory agents, whereas cotton dust also contains agents that inhibit histaminase activity; flax dust contains agents potentiating histamine activity. These agents working together result in the accumulation or depletion of histamine observed in the different groups of animals exposed to either cotton or flax dust in this study.
PMCID: PMC1009285  PMID: 6722048
2.  Role of histamine in the aetiology of byssinosis. I Blood histamine concentrations in workers exposed to cotton and flax dusts. 
The formation or the accumulation, or both, of histamine in the lungs may be potentiated by agent(s) present in cotton dust at higher level(s) than in flax dust and negligible in cottonseed dust. It has been suggested that such potentiation may be due to the activation of the ability of the lung to produce histamine and/or produce or recruit mast cells; this may present an acceptable explanation of the mechanism by which the propagation of the chronic effect of the dust proceeds in cotton and flax workers. Histamine accumulated in the lung over the weekend is released on exposure to dust causing the symptoms of byssinosis. The difference in the rate of histamine metabolism relative to the rate of histamine formation in byssinotic subjects leads to a more prolonged histamine accumulation than in symptom free subjects, with the consequent appearance of the symptoms of byssinosis. Continuous exposure to dust, without weekend interruption, leads to equivalent rates of histamine formation and metabolism with non-considerable histamine accumulation in the lungs and consequent absence of the symptoms of byssinosis.
PMCID: PMC1009284  PMID: 6202313
3.  Role of family susceptibility, occupational and family histories and individuals' blood groups in the development of silicosis. 
A previous investigation has shown that family susceptibility and occupational and family histories have a decisive role in the development of byssinosis among workers exposed to flax dust. Results of investigation of silicosis in 814 male workers exposed to silica-bearing dust showed that family susceptibility has an important role in the development of silicosis among examined workers, and workers whose fathers had an occupational history of exposure to silica-bearing dust were more resistant to the development of the disease than those with non-exposed fathers. The degree of consanguinity of parents and individuals' blood groups, also, have a role. Workers with cousin parents were relatively highly susceptible to the development of silicosis as well as workers with blood groups "O" or "AB". It has been concluded that the investigated factors might have a role in the development of other occupational diseases and further investigations are indicated.
PMCID: PMC1008760  PMID: 6255981
4.  Dust exposure in manual flax processing in Egypt. 
Manual flax processing originated in Egypt in 2 000 BC. In the present study a representative sample of the workers involved in this trade, where flax is processed in small workshops or homes, was examined, and their dust exposure was evaluated. The study showed that workers handling and processing flax are exposed to high concentrations of dust; the levels of dust at hackling and combing are considerably higher than at batting and spinning. Byssinosis prevailed in 22-9% of the examined workers, and 18-4% of them had their forced expiratory volume in one second reduced by more than 10% at the end of the first morning work period (4 hours) of the week. Both the rates and the grades of these syndromes increased with duration of exposure. Smoking appeared to be one of the important contributory factors in the production of byssinosis. The relationship between dust concentration and prevalence of byssinosis seems to be curvilinear.
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PMCID: PMC1008040  PMID: 1131341
5.  Epidemiological investigation of the role of family susceptibility and occupational and family histories in the development of byssinosis among workers exposed to flax dust. 
Epidemiological investigation of 475 workers exposed to dust in flax processing has shown that family susceptibility has a decisive role in the development of byssinosis in those workers. Workers whose fathers had occupational history of exposure to flax dust were more resistant to the development of the disease than those whose fathers had no such history. Such tolerance was much higher in workers whose fathers were byssinotic than those with byssinosis-free fathers. Further hereditary and immunological investigations are, however, needed.
PMCID: PMC1008079  PMID: 1201256

Results 1-5 (5)