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author:("te kronig, G")
1.  Validation of flow cytometric phospho-STAT5 as a diagnostic tool for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia 
Blood Cancer Journal  2013;3(11):e160-.
To diagnose juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is sometimes challenging, because around 10% of patients lack molecular abnormalities affecting Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway and other diseases such as cytomegalovirus infection can mimic clinical signs of JMML. In order to validate a phospho-specific flow cytometry assay assessing phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 5 (p-STAT5) as a new diagnostic tool for JMML, we examined 22 samples from children with JMML and 47 controls. CD33+/CD34+ cells from 22 patients with JMML showed hyperphosphorylation of STAT5 induced by sub-saturating doses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Using a training set of samples (11 JMML and 23 controls), we identified a threshold for p-STAT5-positive after stimulation with 0.1 ng/ml GM-CSF (17.17%) that discriminates JMML from controls. This threshold was validated in an independent series (11 JMML, 24 controls and 7 cases with diseases other than JMML) where we demonstrated that patients with JMML could be distinguished from other subjects with a sensitivity of 91% (confidence interval (CI) 59–100%) and a specificity of 87% (CI 70–96%). Positive and negative predictive values were 71% (CI 42–92%) and 96% (CI 82–100%), respectively. In conclusion, flow cytometric p-STAT5 profiling is a reliable diagnostic tool for identifying patients with JMML and can contribute to consistency of current diagnostic criteria.
doi:10.1038/bcj.2013.56
PMCID: PMC3880439  PMID: 24241400
juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia; phospho-specific flow cytometry; phospho-STAT5; GM-CSF
2.  Mesenchymal stem cells from Shwachman–Diamond syndrome patients display normal functions and do not contribute to hematological defects 
Blood Cancer Journal  2012;2(10):e94-.
Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by bone marrow (BM) dysfunction and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. SDS patients have an increased risk for myelodisplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the key component of the hematopoietic microenvironment and are relevant in inducing genetic mutations leading to leukemia. However, their role in SDS is still unexplored. We demonstrated that morphology, growth kinetics and expression of surface markers of MSCs from SDS patients (SDS-MSCs) were similar to normal MSCs. Moreover, SDS-MSCs were able to differentiate into mesengenic lineages and to inhibit the proliferation of mitogen-activated lymphocytes. We demonstrated in an in vitro coculture system that SDS-MSCs, significantly inhibited neutrophil apoptosis probably through interleukin-6 production. In a long-term coculture with CD34+-sorted cells, SDS-MSCs were able to sustain CD34+ cells survival and to preserve their stemness. Finally, SDS-MSCs had normal karyotype and did not show any chromosomal abnormality observed in the hematological components of the BM of SDS patients. Despite their pivotal role in the hematopoietic stem cell niche, our data suggest that MSC themselves do not seem to be responsible for the hematological defects typical of SDS patients.
doi:10.1038/bcj.2012.40
PMCID: PMC3483621  PMID: 23064742
Shwachman–Diamond syndrome; mesenchymal stem cells; bone marrow failure; SBDS
3.  Identification of germline susceptibility loci in ETV6-RUNX1-rearranged childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia 
Leukemia  2011;26(5):902-909.
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease of the white blood cells. The etiology of ALL is believed to be multifactorial and likely to involve an interplay of environmental and genetic variables. We performed a genome-wide association study of 355 750 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 474 controls and 419 childhood ALL cases characterized by a t(12;21)(p13;q22) — the most common chromosomal translocation observed in childhood ALL — which leads to an ETV6–RUNX1 gene fusion. The eight most strongly associated SNPs were followed-up in 951 ETV6-RUNX1-positive cases and 3061 controls from Germany/Austria and Italy, respectively. We identified a novel, genome-wide significant risk locus at 3q28 (TP63, rs17505102, PCMH=8.94 × 10−9, OR=0.65). The separate analysis of the combined German/Austrian sample only, revealed additional genome-wide significant associations at 11q11 (OR8U8, rs1945213, P=9.14 × 10−11, OR=0.69) and 8p21.3 (near INTS10, rs920590, P=6.12 × 10−9, OR=1.36). These associations and another association at 11p11.2 (PTPRJ, rs3942852, P=4.95 × 10−7, OR=0.72) remained significant in the German/Austrian replication panel after correction for multiple testing. Our findings demonstrate that germline genetic variation can specifically contribute to the risk of ETV6–RUNX1-positive childhood ALL. The identification of TP63 and PTPRJ as susceptibility genes emphasize the role of the TP53 gene family and the importance of proteins regulating cellular processes in connection with tumorigenesis.
doi:10.1038/leu.2011.302
PMCID: PMC3356560  PMID: 22076464
genome-wide association study; childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia; TP63

Results 1-3 (3)