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1.  A single nucleotide polymorphism in CAPN1 associated with marbling score in Korean cattle 
BMC Genetics  2008;9:33.
Background
Marbling score (MS) is the major quantitative trait that affects carcass quality in beef cattle. In this study, we examined the association between genetic polymorphisms of the micromolar calcium-activated neutral protease gene (micro-calpain, CAPN1) and carcass traits in Korean cattle (also known as Hanwoo).
Results
By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 39 sequence variants within exons and their flanking regions in CAPN1. Among them, 12 common polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in the beef cattle (n = 421). Statistical analysis revealed that a polymorphism in the 3'UTR (c.2151*479C>T) showed significant association with MS (Pcor. = 0.02).
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in CAPN1 might be one of the important genetic factors involved in carcass quality in beef cattle, although it could be false positive association.
doi:10.1186/1471-2156-9-33
PMCID: PMC2386817  PMID: 18423040
2.  Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) polymorphisms associated with carcass traits of meat in Korean cattle 
BMC Genetics  2006;7:35.
Background
Cold carcass weight (CW) and longissimus muscle area (EMA) are the major quantitative traits in beef cattle. In this study, we found several polymorphisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene and examined the association of polymorphisms with carcass traits (CW and EMA) in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo).
Results
By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms within the 9 kb full gene region, including the 1.5 kb promoter region. Among them, six polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in our beef cattle (n = 428) and five marker haplotypes (frequency > 0.1) were identified. Statistical analysis revealed that -4241A>T showed significant associations with CW and EMA.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in GHRH might be one of the important genetic factors that influence carcass yield in beef cattle. Sequence variation/haplotype information identified in this study would provide valuable information for the production of a commercial line of beef cattle.
doi:10.1186/1471-2156-7-35
PMCID: PMC1524984  PMID: 16749938
3.  CD4+CD25hiCD127low Regulatory T Cells Are Increased in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(8):e103975.
Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of CD4+ T cells plays a pivotal role in regulating the immune system. An increase in Treg numbers enables cancer progression by dampening the immune system and allowing tumor cells to evade immune detection and destruction. An increase in Treg numbers and expression of inhibitory cytokines including TGF-β and IL-10 are mechanisms by which Tregs exert their immune suppressive function. However, the presence of Tregs and inhibitory cytokines in oral cancer patients is still unclear. In this study, the presence of circulating Tregs in 39 oral cancer patients and 24 healthy donors was examined by studying the presence of the CD4+CD25hiCD127low cell population in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells using flow cytometry. Serum levels of TGF-β and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. T cell subsets of OSCC patients were found to differ significantly from healthy donors where a decrease in CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and an increase in Tregs (CD4+CD25hiCD127low) were observed. Further, the ratio of CD8+ T cells/Tregs was also decreased in patients compared to healthy donors. The presence of Tregs was accompanied by a decrease in IL-10 but not TGF-β secretion in OSCC patients when compared to donors; in addition, the analysis also revealed that an increased presence of Tregs was accompanied by better patient survival. Amongst OSCC patients, smokers had significantly higher levels of TGF-β. It is apparent that the immune system is compromised in OSCC patients and the characterization of the Treg subpopulation could form a basis for improving our understanding of the perturbations in the immune system that occur during OSCC tumorigenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103975
PMCID: PMC4143252  PMID: 25153698
4.  Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human NORE1 SARAH domain 
The crystallization of the human NORE1 SARAH domain is reported.
NORE1 is an important tumour suppressor in human cancers that interacts with the pro-apoptotic protein kinase MST1/2 through SARAH domains. The SARAH domain (residues 366–413) of human NORE1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6122, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.041, c = 66.092 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°.
doi:10.1107/S1744309112021744
PMCID: PMC3388929  PMID: 22750872
NORE1; apoptosis; tumour suppressors; Ras
5.  Structural basis of the heterodimerization of the MST and RASSF SARAH domains in the Hippo signalling pathway 
The heterodimeric structure of the MST1 and RASSF5 SARAH domains is presented. A comparison of homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions provides a structural basis for the preferential association of the SARAH heterodimer.
Despite recent progress in research on the Hippo signalling pathway, the structural information available in this area is extremely limited. Intriguingly, the homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST) kinases through the so-called ‘SARAH’ (SAV/RASSF/HPO) domains play a critical role in cellular homeostasis, dictating the fate of the cell regarding cell proliferation or apoptosis. To understand the mechanism of the heterodimerization of SARAH domains, the three-dimensional structures of an MST1–RASSF5 SARAH heterodimer and an MST2 SARAH homodimer were determined by X-ray crystallography and were analysed together with that previously determined for the MST1 SARAH homodimer. While the structure of the MST2 homodimer resembled that of the MST1 homodimer, the MST1–RASSF5 heterodimer showed distinct structural features. Firstly, the six N-terminal residues (Asp432–Lys437), which correspond to the short N-terminal 310-helix h1 kinked from the h2 helix in the MST1 homodimer, were disordered. Furthermore, the MST1 SARAH domain in the MST1–RASSF5 complex showed a longer helical structure (Ser438–Lys480) than that in the MST1 homodimer (Val441–Lys480). Moreover, extensive polar and nonpolar contacts in the MST1–RASSF5 SARAH domain were identified which strengthen the interactions in the heterodimer in comparison to the interactions in the homodimer. Denaturation experiments performed using urea also indicated that the MST–RASSF heterodimers are substantially more stable than the MST homodimers. These findings provide structural insights into the role of the MST1–RASSF5 SARAH domain in apoptosis signalling.
doi:10.1107/S139900471400947X
PMCID: PMC4089488  PMID: 25004971
Hippo signalling pathway; SARAH domains; MST; RASSF
6.  NSBP-1 mediates the effects of cholesterol on insulin/IGF-1 signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans 
Nematode sterol-binding protein 1 (NSBP-1) is a homolog of nucleosome assembly protein 1 in mammals that is expressed widely in Caenorhabditis elegans. NSBP-1 mutants are biologically lethal, demonstrating the significance of the gene in growth and development. We investigated how cholesterol influences the insulin signaling pathway through this novel sterol-binding protein in C. elegans. Here we report that NSBP-1 influences many biological processes mediated by insulin signaling, such as longevity, dauer formation, fat storage, and resistance to oxidative stress. We found that NSBP-1 is phosphorylated by AKT-1 downstream of insulin signaling. In the absence of insulin signaling, NSBP-1 is translocated to the nucleus and binds to DAF-16, a FOXO transcription factor, in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Moreover, NSBP-1 and DAF-16 regulate a common set of genes that can directly modulate fat storage, longevity, and resistance to stress. Together, our results present a new steroid-binding molecule that can connect sterol signaling to insulin signaling through direct interaction with FOXO.
doi:10.1007/s00018-012-1221-0
PMCID: PMC3759162  PMID: 23255046
Cholesterol; Cholesterol-binding protein; C. elegans; D2096.8; middot; Insulin/IGF-1 signaling; DAF-16
7.  Solution Structure and Rpn1 Interaction of the UBL Domain of Human RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e62981.
The ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL) domain of ubiquitin-like domain proteins (UDPs) interacts specifically with subunits of the 26 S proteasome. A novel UDP, ubiquitin-like domain-containing C-terminal domain phosphatase (UBLCP1), has been identified as an interacting partner of the 26 S proteasome. We determined the high-resolution solution structure of the UBL domain of human UBLCP1 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The UBL domain of hUBLCP1 has a unique β-strand (β3) and β3-α2 loop, instead of the canonical β4 observed in other UBL domains. The molecular topology and secondary structures are different from those of known UBL domains including that of fly UBLCP1. Data from backbone dynamics shows that the β3-α2 loop is relatively rigid although it might have intrinsic dynamic profile. The positively charged residues of the β3-α2 loop are involved in interacting with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat-like domain of Rpn1.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0062981
PMCID: PMC3646893  PMID: 23667555
8.  Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy 
Klionsky, Daniel J. | Abdalla, Fabio C. | Abeliovich, Hagai | Abraham, Robert T. | Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham | Adeli, Khosrow | Agholme, Lotta | Agnello, Maria | Agostinis, Patrizia | Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A. | Ahn, Hyung Jun | Ait-Mohamed, Ouardia | Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane | Akematsu, Takahiko | Akira, Shizuo | Al-Younes, Hesham M. | Al-Zeer, Munir A. | Albert, Matthew L. | Albin, Roger L. | Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier | Aleo, Maria Francesca | Alirezaei, Mehrdad | Almasan, Alexandru | Almonte-Becerril, Maylin | Amano, Atsuo | Amaravadi, Ravi K. | Amarnath, Shoba | Amer, Amal O. | Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie | Anantharam, Vellareddy | Ann, David K. | Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra | Aoki, Hiroshi | Apostolova, Nadezda | Arancia, Giuseppe | Aris, John P. | Asanuma, Katsuhiko | Asare, Nana Y.O. | Ashida, Hisashi | Askanas, Valerie | Askew, David S. | Auberger, Patrick | Baba, Misuzu | Backues, Steven K. | Baehrecke, Eric H. | Bahr, Ben A. | Bai, Xue-Yuan | Bailly, Yannick | Baiocchi, Robert | Baldini, Giulia | Balduini, Walter | Ballabio, Andrea | Bamber, Bruce A. | Bampton, Edward T.W. | Juhász, Gábor | Bartholomew, Clinton R. | Bassham, Diane C. | Bast, Robert C. | Batoko, Henri | Bay, Boon-Huat | Beau, Isabelle | Béchet, Daniel M. | Begley, Thomas J. | Behl, Christian | Behrends, Christian | Bekri, Soumeya | Bellaire, Bryan | Bendall, Linda J. | Benetti, Luca | Berliocchi, Laura | Bernardi, Henri | Bernassola, Francesca | Besteiro, Sébastien | Bhatia-Kissova, Ingrid | Bi, Xiaoning | Biard-Piechaczyk, Martine | Blum, Janice S. | Boise, Lawrence H. | Bonaldo, Paolo | Boone, David L. | Bornhauser, Beat C. | Bortoluci, Karina R. | Bossis, Ioannis | Bost, Frédéric | Bourquin, Jean-Pierre | Boya, Patricia | Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël | Bozhkov, Peter V. | Brady, Nathan R | Brancolini, Claudio | Brech, Andreas | Brenman, Jay E. | Brennand, Ana | Bresnick, Emery H. | Brest, Patrick | Bridges, Dave | Bristol, Molly L. | Brookes, Paul S. | Brown, Eric J. | Brumell, John H. | Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola | Brunk, Ulf T. | Bulman, Dennis E. | Bultman, Scott J. | Bultynck, Geert | Burbulla, Lena F. | Bursch, Wilfried | Butchar, Jonathan P. | Buzgariu, Wanda | Bydlowski, Sergio P. | Cadwell, Ken | Cahová, Monika | Cai, Dongsheng | Cai, Jiyang | Cai, Qian | Calabretta, Bruno | Calvo-Garrido, Javier | Camougrand, Nadine | Campanella, Michelangelo | Campos-Salinas, Jenny | Candi, Eleonora | Cao, Lizhi | Caplan, Allan B. | Carding, Simon R. | Cardoso, Sandra M. | Carew, Jennifer S. | Carlin, Cathleen R. | Carmignac, Virginie | Carneiro, Leticia A.M. | Carra, Serena | Caruso, Rosario A. | Casari, Giorgio | Casas, Caty | Castino, Roberta | Cebollero, Eduardo | Cecconi, Francesco | Celli, Jean | Chaachouay, Hassan | Chae, Han-Jung | Chai, Chee-Yin | Chan, David C. | Chan, Edmond Y. | Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung | Che, Chi-Ming | Chen, Ching-Chow | Chen, Guang-Chao | Chen, Guo-Qiang | Chen, Min | Chen, Quan | Chen, Steve S.-L. | Chen, WenLi | Chen, Xi | Chen, Xiangmei | Chen, Xiequn | Chen, Ye-Guang | Chen, Yingyu | Chen, Yongqiang | Chen, Yu-Jen | Chen, Zhixiang | Cheng, Alan | Cheng, Christopher H.K. | Cheng, Yan | Cheong, Heesun | Cheong, Jae-Ho | Cherry, Sara | Chess-Williams, Russ | Cheung, Zelda H. | Chevet, Eric | Chiang, Hui-Ling | Chiarelli, Roberto | Chiba, Tomoki | Chin, Lih-Shen | Chiou, Shih-Hwa | Chisari, Francis V. | Cho, Chi Hin | Cho, Dong-Hyung | Choi, Augustine M.K. | Choi, DooSeok | Choi, Kyeong Sook | Choi, Mary E. | Chouaib, Salem | Choubey, Divaker | Choubey, Vinay | Chu, Charleen T. | Chuang, Tsung-Hsien | Chueh, Sheau-Huei | Chun, Taehoon | Chwae, Yong-Joon | Chye, Mee-Len | Ciarcia, Roberto | Ciriolo, Maria R. | Clague, Michael J. | Clark, Robert S.B. | Clarke, Peter G.H. | Clarke, Robert | Codogno, Patrice | Coller, Hilary A. | Colombo, María I. | Comincini, Sergio | Condello, Maria | Condorelli, Fabrizio | Cookson, Mark R. | Coombs, Graham H. | Coppens, Isabelle | Corbalan, Ramon | Cossart, Pascale | Costelli, Paola | Costes, Safia | Coto-Montes, Ana | Couve, Eduardo | Coxon, Fraser P. | Cregg, James M. | Crespo, José L. | Cronjé, Marianne J. | Cuervo, Ana Maria | Cullen, Joseph J. | Czaja, Mark J. | D'Amelio, Marcello | Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette | Davids, Lester M. | Davies, Faith E. | De Felici, Massimo | de Groot, John F. | de Haan, Cornelis A.M. | De Martino, Luisa | De Milito, Angelo | De Tata, Vincenzo | Debnath, Jayanta | Degterev, Alexei | Dehay, Benjamin | Delbridge, Lea M.D. | Demarchi, Francesca | Deng, Yi Zhen | Dengjel, Jörn | Dent, Paul | Denton, Donna | Deretic, Vojo | Desai, Shyamal D. | Devenish, Rodney J. | Di Gioacchino, Mario | Di Paolo, Gilbert | Di Pietro, Chiara | Díaz-Araya, Guillermo | Díaz-Laviada, Inés | Diaz-Meco, Maria T. | Diaz-Nido, Javier | Dikic, Ivan | Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P. | Ding, Wen-Xing | Distelhorst, Clark W. | Diwan, Abhinav | Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan | Dokudovskaya, Svetlana | Dong, Zheng | Dorsey, Frank C. | Dosenko, Victor | Dowling, James J. | Doxsey, Stephen | Dreux, Marlène | Drew, Mark E. | Duan, Qiuhong | Duchosal, Michel A. | Duff, Karen E. | Dugail, Isabelle | Durbeej, Madeleine | Duszenko, Michael | Edelstein, Charles L. | Edinger, Aimee L. | Egea, Gustavo | Eichinger, Ludwig | Eissa, N. Tony | Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan | El-Deiry, Wafik S. | Elazar, Zvulun | Elgendy, Mohamed | Ellerby, Lisa M. | Eng, Kai Er | Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart | Engelender, Simone | Erenpreisa, Jekaterina | Escalante, Ricardo | Esclatine, Audrey | Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa | Espert, Lucile | Espina, Virginia | Fan, Huizhou | Fan, Jia | Fan, Qi-Wen | Fan, Zhen | Fang, Shengyun | Fang, Yongqi | Fanto, Manolis | Fanzani, Alessandro | Farkas, Thomas | Farre, Jean-Claude | Faure, Mathias | Fechheimer, Marcus | Feng, Carl G. | Feng, Jian | Feng, Qili | Feng, Youji | Fésüs, László | Feuer, Ralph | Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E. | Fimia, Gian Maria | Fingar, Diane C. | Finkbeiner, Steven | Finkel, Toren | Finley, Kim D. | Fiorito, Filomena | Fisher, Edward A. | Fisher, Paul B. | Flajolet, Marc | Florez-McClure, Maria L. | Florio, Salvatore | Fon, Edward A. | Fornai, Francesco | Fortunato, Franco | Fotedar, Rati | Fowler, Daniel H. | Fox, Howard S. | Franco, Rodrigo | Frankel, Lisa B. | Fransen, Marc | Fuentes, José M. | Fueyo, Juan | Fujii, Jun | Fujisaki, Kozo | Fujita, Eriko | Fukuda, Mitsunori | Furukawa, Ruth H. | Gaestel, Matthias | Gailly, Philippe | Gajewska, Malgorzata | Galliot, Brigitte | Galy, Vincent | Ganesh, Subramaniam | Ganetzky, Barry | Ganley, Ian G. | Gao, Fen-Biao | Gao, George F. | Gao, Jinming | Garcia, Lorena | Garcia-Manero, Guillermo | Garcia-Marcos, Mikel | Garmyn, Marjan | Gartel, Andrei L. | Gatti, Evelina | Gautel, Mathias | Gawriluk, Thomas R. | Gegg, Matthew E. | Geng, Jiefei | Germain, Marc | Gestwicki, Jason E. | Gewirtz, David A. | Ghavami, Saeid | Ghosh, Pradipta | Giammarioli, Anna M. | Giatromanolaki, Alexandra N. | Gibson, Spencer B. | Gilkerson, Robert W. | Ginger, Michael L. | Ginsberg, Henry N. | Golab, Jakub | Goligorsky, Michael S. | Golstein, Pierre | Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria | Goncu, Ebru | Gongora, Céline | Gonzalez, Claudio D. | Gonzalez, Ramon | González-Estévez, Cristina | González-Polo, Rosa Ana | Gonzalez-Rey, Elena | Gorbunov, Nikolai V. | Gorski, Sharon | Goruppi, Sandro | Gottlieb, Roberta A. | Gozuacik, Devrim | Granato, Giovanna Elvira | Grant, Gary D. | Green, Kim N. | Gregorc, Ales | Gros, Frédéric | Grose, Charles | Grunt, Thomas W. | Gual, Philippe | Guan, Jun-Lin | Guan, Kun-Liang | Guichard, Sylvie M. | Gukovskaya, Anna S. | Gukovsky, Ilya | Gunst, Jan | Gustafsson, Åsa B. | Halayko, Andrew J. | Hale, Amber N. | Halonen, Sandra K. | Hamasaki, Maho | Han, Feng | Han, Ting | Hancock, Michael K. | Hansen, Malene | Harada, Hisashi | Harada, Masaru | Hardt, Stefan E. | Harper, J. Wade | Harris, Adrian L. | Harris, James | Harris, Steven D. | Hashimoto, Makoto | Haspel, Jeffrey A. | Hayashi, Shin-ichiro | Hazelhurst, Lori A. | He, Congcong | He, You-Wen | Hébert, Marie-Josée | Heidenreich, Kim A. | Helfrich, Miep H. | Helgason, Gudmundur V. | Henske, Elizabeth P. | Herman, Brian | Herman, Paul K. | Hetz, Claudio | Hilfiker, Sabine | Hill, Joseph A. | Hocking, Lynne J. | Hofman, Paul | Hofmann, Thomas G. | Höhfeld, Jörg | Holyoake, Tessa L. | Hong, Ming-Huang | Hood, David A. | Hotamisligil, Gökhan S. | Houwerzijl, Ewout J. | Høyer-Hansen, Maria | Hu, Bingren | Hu, Chien-an A. | Hu, Hong-Ming | Hua, Ya | Huang, Canhua | Huang, Ju | Huang, Shengbing | Huang, Wei-Pang | Huber, Tobias B. | Huh, Won-Ki | Hung, Tai-Ho | Hupp, Ted R. | Hur, Gang Min | Hurley, James B. | Hussain, Sabah N.A. | Hussey, Patrick J. | Hwang, Jung Jin | Hwang, Seungmin | Ichihara, Atsuhiro | Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin | Inoki, Ken | Into, Takeshi | Iovane, Valentina | Iovanna, Juan L. | Ip, Nancy Y. | Isaka, Yoshitaka | Ishida, Hiroyuki | Isidoro, Ciro | Isobe, Ken-ichi | Iwasaki, Akiko | Izquierdo, Marta | Izumi, Yotaro | Jaakkola, Panu M. | Jäättelä, Marja | Jackson, George R. | Jackson, William T. | Janji, Bassam | Jendrach, Marina | Jeon, Ju-Hong | Jeung, Eui-Bae | Jiang, Hong | Jiang, Hongchi | Jiang, Jean X. | Jiang, Ming | Jiang, Qing | Jiang, Xuejun | Jiang, Xuejun | Jiménez, Alberto | Jin, Meiyan | Jin, Shengkan V. | Joe, Cheol O. | Johansen, Terje | Johnson, Daniel E. | Johnson, Gail V.W. | Jones, Nicola L. | Joseph, Bertrand | Joseph, Suresh K. | Joubert, Annie M. | Juhász, Gábor | Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne | Jung, Chang Hwa | Jung, Yong-Keun | Kaarniranta, Kai | Kaasik, Allen | Kabuta, Tomohiro | Kadowaki, Motoni | Kågedal, Katarina | Kamada, Yoshiaki | Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O. | Kampinga, Harm H. | Kanamori, Hiromitsu | Kang, Chanhee | Kang, Khong Bee | Kang, Kwang Il | Kang, Rui | Kang, Yoon-A | Kanki, Tomotake | Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi | Kanno, Haruo | Kanthasamy, Anumantha G. | Kanthasamy, Arthi | Karantza, Vassiliki | Kaushal, Gur P. | Kaushik, Susmita | Kawazoe, Yoshinori | Ke, Po-Yuan | Kehrl, John H. | Kelekar, Ameeta | Kerkhoff, Claus | Kessel, David H. | Khalil, Hany | Kiel, Jan A.K.W. | Kiger, Amy A. | Kihara, Akio | Kim, Deok Ryong | Kim, Do-Hyung | Kim, Dong-Hou | Kim, Eun-Kyoung | Kim, Hyung-Ryong | Kim, Jae-Sung | Kim, Jeong Hun | Kim, Jin Cheon | Kim, John K. | Kim, Peter K. | Kim, Seong Who | Kim, Yong-Sun | Kim, Yonghyun | Kimchi, Adi | Kimmelman, Alec C. | King, Jason S. | Kinsella, Timothy J. | Kirkin, Vladimir | Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A. | Kitamoto, Katsuhiko | Kitazato, Kaio | Klein, Ludger | Klimecki, Walter T. | Klucken, Jochen | Knecht, Erwin | Ko, Ben C.B. | Koch, Jan C. | Koga, Hiroshi | Koh, Jae-Young | Koh, Young Ho | Koike, Masato | Komatsu, Masaaki | Kominami, Eiki | Kong, Hee Jeong | Kong, Wei-Jia | Korolchuk, Viktor I. | Kotake, Yaichiro | Koukourakis, Michael I. | Flores, Juan B. 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Angus | Meijer, Alfred J. | Meisler, Miriam H. | Meléndez, Alicia | Melia, Thomas J. | Melino, Gerry | Mena, Maria A. | Menendez, Javier A. | Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. 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Javier | Olsen, Laura J. | Olsson, Stefan | Opota, Onya | Osborne, Timothy F. | Ostrander, Gary K. | Otsu, Kinya | Ou, Jing-hsiung James | Ouimet, Mireille | Overholtzer, Michael | Ozpolat, Bulent | Paganetti, Paolo | Pagnini, Ugo | Pallet, Nicolas | Palmer, Glen E. | Palumbo, Camilla | Pan, Tianhong | Panaretakis, Theocharis | Pandey, Udai Bhan | Papackova, Zuzana | Papassideri, Issidora | Paris, Irmgard | Park, Junsoo | Park, Ohkmae K. | Parys, Jan B. | Parzych, Katherine R. | Patschan, Susann | Patterson, Cam | Pattingre, Sophie | Pawelek, John M. | Peng, Jianxin | Perlmutter, David H. | Perrotta, Ida | Perry, George | Pervaiz, Shazib | Peter, Matthias | Peters, Godefridus J. | Petersen, Morten | Petrovski, Goran | Phang, James M. | Piacentini, Mauro | Pierre, Philippe | Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie | Pierron, Gérard | Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit | Piras, Antonio | Piri, Natik | Platanias, Leonidas C. | Pöggeler, Stefanie | Poirot, Marc | Poletti, Angelo | Poüs, Christian | Pozuelo-Rubio, Mercedes | Prætorius-Ibba, Mette | Prasad, Anil | Prescott, Mark | Priault, Muriel | Produit-Zengaffinen, Nathalie | Progulske-Fox, Ann | Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula | Przedborski, Serge | Przyklenk, Karin | Puertollano, Rosa | Puyal, Julien | Qian, Shu-Bing | Qin, Liang | Qin, Zheng-Hong | Quaggin, Susan E. | Raben, Nina | Rabinowich, Hannah | Rabkin, Simon W. | Rahman, Irfan | Rami, Abdelhaq | Ramm, Georg | Randall, Glenn | Randow, Felix | Rao, V. Ashutosh | Rathmell, Jeffrey C. | Ravikumar, Brinda | Ray, Swapan K. | Reed, Bruce H. | Reed, John C. | Reggiori, Fulvio | Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne | Reichert, Andreas S. | Reiners, John J. | Reiter, Russel J. | Ren, Jun | Revuelta, José L. | Rhodes, Christopher J. | Ritis, Konstantinos | Rizzo, Elizete | Robbins, Jeffrey | Roberge, Michel | Roca, Hernan | Roccheri, Maria C. | Rocchi, Stephane | Rodemann, H. Peter | Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago | Rohrer, Bärbel | Roninson, Igor B. | Rosen, Kirill | Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M. | Rouis, Mustapha | Rouschop, Kasper M.A. | Rovetta, Francesca | Rubin, Brian P. | Rubinsztein, David C. | Ruckdeschel, Klaus | Rucker, Edmund B. | Rudich, Assaf | Rudolf, Emil | Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson | Russo, Rossella | Rusten, Tor Erik | Ryan, Kevin M. | Ryter, Stefan W. | Sabatini, David M. | Sadoshima, Junichi | Saha, Tapas | Saitoh, Tatsuya | Sakagami, Hiroshi | Sakai, Yasuyoshi | Salekdeh, Ghasem Hoseini | Salomoni, Paolo | Salvaterra, Paul M. | Salvesen, Guy | Salvioli, Rosa | Sanchez, Anthony M.J. | Sánchez-Alcázar, José A. | Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo | Sandri, Marco | Sankar, Uma | Sansanwal, Poonam | Santambrogio, Laura | Saran, Shweta | Sarkar, Sovan | Sarwal, Minnie | Sasakawa, Chihiro | Sasnauskiene, Ausra | Sass, Miklós | Sato, Ken | Sato, Miyuki | Schapira, Anthony H.V. | Scharl, Michael | Schätzl, Hermann M. | Scheper, Wiep | Schiaffino, Stefano | Schneider, Claudio | Schneider, Marion E. | Schneider-Stock, Regine | Schoenlein, Patricia V. | Schorderet, Daniel F. | Schüller, Christoph | Schwartz, Gary K. | Scorrano, Luca | Sealy, Linda | Seglen, Per O. | Segura-Aguilar, Juan | Seiliez, Iban | Seleverstov, Oleksandr | Sell, Christian | Seo, Jong Bok | Separovic, Duska | Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi | Setoguchi, Takao | Settembre, Carmine | Shacka, John J. | Shanmugam, Mala | Shapiro, Irving M. | Shaulian, Eitan | Shaw, Reuben J. | Shelhamer, James H. | Shen, Han-Ming | Shen, Wei-Chiang
Autophagy  2012;8(4):445-544.
In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
doi:10.4161/auto.19496
PMCID: PMC3404883  PMID: 22966490
LC3; autolysosome; autophagosome; flux; lysosome; phagophore; stress; vacuole
9.  Characteristics of Non-typhoidal Salmonella Isolates from Human and Broiler-chickens in Southwestern Seoul, Korea 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2007;22(5):773-778.
Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is an important commensal microorganism. The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiological relation between NTS isolates from livestock and NTS isolates from human by analyzing antimicrobial susceptibilities and performing molecular typing. We determined the serotypes of 36 human clinical isolates and 64 livestock isolates, performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing against 8 antibiotics, and determined the molecular types of isolated NTS spp. by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In human isolates, S. enteritidis was the most common serotype (17 isolates; 47.2%) and S. typhimurium the second most (8 isolates; 22.2%). In livestock isolates, S. typhimurium was the most common serotype (15 isolates; 23.44%), and S. enteritidis was the second most (14 isolates; 21.88%). Ampicillin and tetracycline resistance were 50% (32/64 isolates) each among broiler-chicken NTS isolates. No human or livestock NTS isolates showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, TMP-SMX, or ceftriaxone. However, 19.4% (7/36) and 46.8% (30/64) of the human and livestock NTS isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC ≥16 mg/mL), respectively. The presence of the three identical PFGE molecular types from human and broiler-chicken NTS isolates suggests the possibility of transmission from livestock to humans.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2007.22.5.773
PMCID: PMC2693839  PMID: 17982221
Salmonella Infections; Salmonella Enteritidis; Salmonella Typhimurium; Epidemiology
10.  Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in an immunocompetent pregnant woman 
Background
Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, which is associated with abnormal cellular immunity.
Case presentation
A 26-year-old pregnant woman presented with fever and general weakness. Miliary lung nodules were noted on chest X-ray. Under the impression of miliary tuberculosis, anti-tuberculosis medication was administered. However, the patient was not improved. Further work-up demonstrated MAC in the sputum and placenta. The patient was treated successfully with clarithromycin-based combination regimen.
Conclusion
This appears to be the first case of disseminated MAC in an otherwise healthy pregnant woman. Clinicians should be alert for the diagnosis of MAC infection in diverse clinical conditions.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-6-154
PMCID: PMC1634852  PMID: 17054802
11.  Prognostic Significance of Infection Acquisition Sites in Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis: Nosocomial versus Community Acquired 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2006;21(4):666-671.
Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is an ascitic fluid infection as a complication of end stage liver disease. The outcome is related to the severity of hepatorenal function, gastrointestinal bleeding, and many others; however it is not well known whether the infection acquisition sites have an effect on the prognosis of SBP. In order to identify the prognostic significance of the acquisition sites, we studied 106 patients who were diagnosed as culture positive SBP between October 1998 and August 2003. Thirty-two episodes were nosocomial and 74 were community acquired. Gram-negative bacilli such as Escherichia coli were dominant in both of the nosocomial and community-acquired SBPs. Despite significantly higher resistance to cefotaxime in nosocomial isolates compared to community-acquired isolates (77.8% vs. 13.6%, p=0.001), no difference was found regarding short or long term prognosis. Infection acquisition sites were not related to short or long term prognosis either. Shock, gastrointestinal bleeding and renal dysfunction were related to short term prognosis. Only Child-Pugh class C was identified as an independent prognostic factor of long-term survival.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2006.21.4.666
PMCID: PMC2729888  PMID: 16891810
Liver Cirrhosis; Peritonitis; Cross Infection; Community-Acquired Infections
12.  Rapid preparation of RNA samples for NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(10):e84.
Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of RNA and its complexes is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of RNA recognition by proteins or ligands. Enzymatic synthesis using T7 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is used to prepare samples for NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. However, this run-off transcription method results in heterogeneity at the RNA 3-terminus. For structural studies, RNA purification requires a single nucleotide resolution. Usually PAGE purification is used, but it is tedious, time-consuming and cost ineffective. To overcome these problems in high-throughput RNA synthesis, we devised a method of RNA preparation that uses trans-acting DNAzyme and sequence-specific affinity column chromatography. A tag sequence is added at the 3′ end of RNA, and the tagged RNA is picked out using an affinity column that contains the complementary DNA sequence. The 3′ end tag is then removed by sequence-specific cleavage using trans-acting DNAzyme, the arm lengths of which are optimized for turnover number. This purification method is simpler and faster than the conventional method.
doi:10.1093/nar/gnh081
PMCID: PMC434460  PMID: 15199176
13.  A single-nucleotide natural variation (U4 to C4) in an influenza A virus promoter exhibits a large structural change: implications for differential viral RNA synthesis by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(4):1216-1223.
The influenza A virus promoter is recognized by the influenza A virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and directs both transcription and replication of the viral RNA genome. Within the sequence of this promoter, flu strains exhibit a natural, unique variation, either a U or a C, at the fourth position from the 3′ end. Promoters that contain a C residue (C4 promoter), which are invariably found in genome segments that encode the three RNA polymerase subunits (PB1, PB2 and PA), down-regulate transcription but activate genome replication. Here, we have determined the structure of the C4 promoter by NMR spectroscopy and compared it with the structure of the U4 promoter, which was determined previously. The structure of the internal loop in the C4 promoter is similar to that of the U4 promoter. However, the terminal stem of the C4 promoter is strikingly different from that of the U4 promoter. These structural data suggest that the internal loop is important for polymerase binding to the promoter, and the terminal stem is crucial for differential regulation of transcription and replication.
PMCID: PMC150232  PMID: 12582241
14.  Structure of influenza virus panhandle RNA studied by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1999;27(5):1392-1397.
The structure of a 34 nucleotide RNA molecule in solution, which contains the conserved panhandle sequences, was determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The partially double-strandedpanhandle structure of the influenza virus RNA serves to regulate initiation and termination of viral transcription as well as polyadenylation. The panhandle RNA consists of internal loop flanked by short helices. The nucleotides at or near the internal loop are crucial for polymerase binding and transcriptional activity. They show more flexible conformational character than the Watson-Crick base-paired region, especially for the backbone torsion angles of alpha, gamma and delta. Although residues A10 and A12 are stacked in the helix, the phosphodiester backbones are distorted. Residues A12, A13 and G25 show dynamic sugar conformations and the backbone conformations of these nucleotides are flexible. This backbone conformation and its associated flexibility may be important for protein-RNA interactions as well as base-specific interactions.
PMCID: PMC148329  PMID: 9973631
15.  Secondary structure of the panhandle RNA of influenza virus A studied by NMR spectroscopy. 
Nucleic Acids Research  1996;24(21):4197-4201.
The double-stranded panhandle structure of the influenza virus RNA is important for replication, transcription and packaging into the virion of the virion RNA. The solution structure of a 34 nt RNA which contains the conserved panhandle sequences has been investigated by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The partially complementary 5'- and 3'-ends of the RNA form a double helical structure which is, on average, close to A-form. The stem contains bulges at nucleotides A10, A12 and C26. In between these bulges, C11 and G25 form a Watson-Crick base pair. The structural features of the panhandle provide a framework for the explanation of mutational analysis and for a better understanding of RNA-polymerase interactions.
PMCID: PMC146218  PMID: 8932372
16.  Generalized Seizure in a Mauritian Woman Taking Bupropion 
PLoS Medicine  2004;1(1):e15.
PRESENTATION of CASE
A 24-y-old woman was admitted to the emergency department having had a generalized seizure (acute loss of consciousness, convulsive movements of her arms and legs, and confusion on regaining consciousness). She was on the sixth day of treatment with 300 mg daily of slow-release bupropion (Zyban SR) as an aid to smoking cessation. She had a past medical history of tonsillectomy and hay fever, for which she was taking budesonide nasal drops (two drops daily, each drop 200 mcg). She was on no other medication. There was no history of head trauma, liver disease, or alcohol withdrawal. Clinical examination, including neurological examination, was normal. The patient's weight was 48 kg. Her blood pressure was 130/80 mm Hg. Electrocardiogram showed a sinus tachycardia at 102 beats per minute. Radiography of the skull and a computed tomography scan of the brain without contrast were both normal. The patient's blood glucose, urea, electrolytes, and liver function tests were all normal. Her serum calcium was 2.01 mmol/l (normal range, 2.0–2.6 mmol/l) and her hemoglobin was 116 g/l (normal range, 120–140 g/l). The bupropion was discontinued, and the patient recovered without any further seizures or other neurological sequelae.
Bupropion recently came onto the Mauritian market as an aid to smoking cessation. This case report is a useful reminder to clinicians of the risks of taking the drug
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0010015
PMCID: PMC523836  PMID: 15526043
17.  Transmitted drug resistance in recently infected HIV-positive Individuals from four urban locations across Asia (2007–2010) – TASER-S 
Background
The availability of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been associated with the development of transmitted drug resistance-associated mutations (TDRM). TDRM can compromise treatment effectiveness in patients initiating ART and the prevalence can vary in different clinical settings. In this study, we investigated the proportion of TDRM in treatment-naïve, recently infected HIV-positive individuals sampled from four urban locations across Asia between 2007–2010.
Methods
Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance – Surveillance Study (TASER-S) were genotyped prior to ART initiation, with resulting resistance mutations analysed according to the WHO 2009 list.
Results
Proportions of TDRM from recently infected individuals from TASER-S ranged from 0% to 8.7% - Hong Kong: 3/88 (3.4%, 95% CI (0.71%-9.64%)); Thailand: Bangkok: 13/277 (4.7%, 95% CI (2.5%-7.9%)), Chiang Mai: 0/17 (0%, 97.5% CI (0%-19.5%)); and the Philippines: 6/69 (8.7%, 95% CI (3.3%-18.0%)). There was no significant increase in TDRM over time across all four clinical settings.
Conclusions
The observed proportion of TDRM in TASER-S patients from Hong Kong, Thailand and the Philippines was low to moderate during the study period. Regular monitoring of TDRM should be encouraged, especially with the scale-up of ART at higher CD4 levels.
doi:10.1186/s12981-015-0043-1
PMCID: PMC4326480
Transmitted; Drug resistance; Asia; Resource-limited; Recent-infection
18.  Volumetric Analysis of the Hypothalamus in Huntington Disease Using 3T MRI: The IMAGE-HD Study 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(2):e0117593.
Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Non-motor symptoms and signs such as psychiatric disturbances, sleep problems and metabolic dysfunction are part of the disease manifestation. These aspects may relate to changes in the hypothalamus, an area of the brain involved in the regulation of emotion, sleep and metabolism. Neuropathological and imaging studies using both voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) have demonstrated pathological changes in the hypothalamic region during early stages in symptomatic HD. In this investigation, we aimed to establish a robust method for measurements of the hypothalamic volume in MRI in order to determine whether the hypothalamic dysfunction in HD is associated with the volume of this region. Using T1-weighted imaging, we describe a reproducible delineation procedure to estimate the hypothalamic volume which was based on the same landmarks used in histologically processed postmortem hypothalamic tissue. Participants included 36 prodromal HD (pre-HD), 33 symptomatic HD (symp-HD) and 33 control participants who underwent MRI scanning at baseline and 18 months follow-up as part of the IMAGE-HD study. We found no evidence of cross-sectional or longitudinal changes between groups in hypothalamic volume. Our results suggest that hypothalamic pathology in HD is not associated with volume changes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0117593
PMCID: PMC4319930  PMID: 25659157
20.  Sternal Healing after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Bilateral Internal Thoracic Arteries: Assessment by Computed Tomography Scan 
Background
This study aimed to investigate sternal healing over time and the incidence of poor sternal healing in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery using bilateral internal thoracic arteries.
Methods
This study enrolled 197 patients who underwent isolated CABG using skeletonized bilateral internal thoracic arteries (sBITA) from 2006 through 2009. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed on all patients at monthly intervals for three to six months after surgery. In 108 patients, an additional CT study was performed 24 to 48 months after surgery. The axial CT images were used to score sternal fusion at the manubrium, the upper sternum, and the lower sternum. These scores were added to evaluate overall healing: a score of 0 to 1 reflected poor healing, a score of 2 to 4 was defined as fair healing, and a score of 5 to 6 indicated complete healing. Medical records were also retrospectively reviewed to identify perioperative variables associated with poor early sternal healing.
Results
Three to six months after surgery, the average total score of sternal healing was 2.07±1.52 and 68 patients (34.5%) showed poor healing. Poor healing was most frequently found in the manubrium, which was scored as zero in 72.6% of patients. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with poor early healing were shorter post-surgery time, older age, diabetes mellitus, and postoperative renal dysfunction. In later CT images, the average sternal healing score improved to 5.88±0.38 and complete healing was observed in 98.2% of patients.
Conclusion
Complete sternal healing takes more than three months after a median sternotomy for CABG using sBITA. Healing is most delayed in the manubrium.
doi:10.5090/kjtcs.2015.48.1.33
PMCID: PMC4333848
Coronary artery bypass; Wound healing; Mammary arteries; Computed tomography
21.  Sociodemographic factors associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors among Malaysian adults 
BMC Public Health  2015;15:68.
Background
To determine the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Malaysian adults.
Methods
We analysed data on 1044 men and 1528 women, aged 24–64 years, participants in the Non Communicable Disease Surveillance 2005/2006, a nationally representative, population-based, cross-sectional study. Prevalence of obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycemia, physical inactivity, smoking, risky drinking, low vegetable and fruit intake were determined and multivariable logistic regression was used to identify sociodemographic factors associated with having ≥3 of these cardiovascular disease risk factors.
Results
The response rate was 84.6% (2572/3040). Overall, 68.4% (95% CI: 63.2, 73.1) had at least three risk factors. Among men, older age and Indian ethnicity were independently associated with having ≥3 CVD risk factors; while among women, older age, low education, and housewives were more likely to have ≥3 CVD risk factors.
Conclusion
The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors clustering among Malaysian adults is high, raising concerns that cardiovascular disease incidence will rise steeply in the near future if no immediate preventive measures are taken. The current national health education and promotion programmes pertaining to modifiable risk factors can be further improved by taking into account the sociodemographic variation in CVD risk factors clustering.
doi:10.1186/s12889-015-1432-z
PMCID: PMC4319230  PMID: 25636327
Adult; Prevalence; Cardiovascular disease; Sociodemographic correlates; Lifestyle
22.  Biological Insights From 108 Schizophrenia-Associated Genetic Loci 
Ripke, Stephan | Neale, Benjamin M | Corvin, Aiden | Walters, James TR | Farh, Kai-How | Holmans, Peter A | Lee, Phil | Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan | Collier, David A | Huang, Hailiang | Pers, Tune H | Agartz, Ingrid | Agerbo, Esben | Albus, Margot | Alexander, Madeline | Amin, Farooq | Bacanu, Silviu A | Begemann, Martin | Belliveau, Richard A | Bene, Judit | Bergen, Sarah E | Bevilacqua, Elizabeth | Bigdeli, Tim B | Black, Donald W | Bruggeman, Richard | Buccola, Nancy G | Buckner, Randy L | Byerley, William | Cahn, Wiepke | Cai, Guiqing | Campion, Dominique | Cantor, Rita M | Carr, Vaughan J | Carrera, Noa | Catts, Stanley V | Chambert, Kimberley D | Chan, Raymond CK | Chan, Ronald YL | Chen, Eric YH | Cheng, Wei | Cheung, Eric FC | Chong, Siow Ann | Cloninger, C Robert | Cohen, David | Cohen, Nadine | Cormican, Paul | Craddock, Nick | Crowley, James J | Curtis, David | Davidson, Michael | Davis, Kenneth L | Degenhardt, Franziska | Del Favero, Jurgen | Demontis, Ditte | Dikeos, Dimitris | Dinan, Timothy | Djurovic, Srdjan | Donohoe, Gary | Drapeau, Elodie | Duan, Jubao | Dudbridge, Frank | Durmishi, Naser | Eichhammer, Peter | Eriksson, Johan | Escott-Price, Valentina | Essioux, Laurent | Fanous, Ayman H | Farrell, Martilias S | Frank, Josef | Franke, Lude | Freedman, Robert | Freimer, Nelson B | Friedl, Marion | Friedman, Joseph I | Fromer, Menachem | Genovese, Giulio | Georgieva, Lyudmila | Giegling, Ina | Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola | Godard, Stephanie | Goldstein, Jacqueline I | Golimbet, Vera | Gopal, Srihari | Gratten, Jacob | de Haan, Lieuwe | Hammer, Christian | Hamshere, Marian L | Hansen, Mark | Hansen, Thomas | Haroutunian, Vahram | Hartmann, Annette M | Henskens, Frans A | Herms, Stefan | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Hoffmann, Per | Hofman, Andrea | Hollegaard, Mads V | Hougaard, David M | Ikeda, Masashi | Joa, Inge | Julià, Antonio | Kahn, René S | Kalaydjieva, Luba | Karachanak-Yankova, Sena | Karjalainen, Juha | Kavanagh, David | Keller, Matthew C | Kennedy, James L | Khrunin, Andrey | Kim, Yunjung | Klovins, Janis | Knowles, James A | Konte, Bettina | Kucinskas, Vaidutis | Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele | Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana | Kähler, Anna K | Laurent, Claudine | Lee, Jimmy | Lee, S Hong | Legge, Sophie E | Lerer, Bernard | Li, Miaoxin | Li, Tao | Liang, Kung-Yee | Lieberman, Jeffrey | Limborska, Svetlana | Loughland, Carmel M | Lubinski, Jan | Lönnqvist, Jouko | Macek, Milan | Magnusson, Patrik KE | Maher, Brion S | Maier, Wolfgang | Mallet, Jacques | Marsal, Sara | Mattheisen, Manuel | Mattingsdal, Morten | McCarley, Robert W | McDonald, Colm | McIntosh, Andrew M | Meier, Sandra | Meijer, Carin J | Melegh, Bela | Melle, Ingrid | Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I | Metspalu, Andres | Michie, Patricia T | Milani, Lili | Milanova, Vihra | Mokrab, Younes | Morris, Derek W | Mors, Ole | Murphy, Kieran C | Murray, Robin M | Myin-Germeys, Inez | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Nelis, Mari | Nenadic, Igor | Nertney, Deborah A | Nestadt, Gerald | Nicodemus, Kristin K | Nikitina-Zake, Liene | Nisenbaum, Laura | Nordin, Annelie | O’Callaghan, Eadbhard | O’Dushlaine, Colm | O’Neill, F Anthony | Oh, Sang-Yun | Olincy, Ann | Olsen, Line | Van Os, Jim | Pantelis, Christos | Papadimitriou, George N | Papiol, Sergi | Parkhomenko, Elena | Pato, Michele T | Paunio, Tiina | Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica | Perkins, Diana O | Pietiläinen, Olli | Pimm, Jonathan | Pocklington, Andrew J | Powell, John | Price, Alkes | Pulver, Ann E | Purcell, Shaun M | Quested, Digby | Rasmussen, Henrik B | Reichenberg, Abraham | Reimers, Mark A | Richards, Alexander L | Roffman, Joshua L | Roussos, Panos | Ruderfer, Douglas M | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanders, Alan R | Schall, Ulrich | Schubert, Christian R | Schulze, Thomas G | Schwab, Sibylle G | Scolnick, Edward M | Scott, Rodney J | Seidman, Larry J | Shi, Jianxin | Sigurdsson, Engilbert | Silagadze, Teimuraz | Silverman, Jeremy M | Sim, Kang | Slominsky, Petr | Smoller, Jordan W | So, Hon-Cheong | Spencer, Chris C A | Stahl, Eli A | Stefansson, Hreinn | Steinberg, Stacy | Stogmann, Elisabeth | Straub, Richard E | Strengman, Eric | Strohmaier, Jana | Stroup, T Scott | Subramaniam, Mythily | Suvisaari, Jaana | Svrakic, Dragan M | Szatkiewicz, Jin P | Söderman, Erik | Thirumalai, Srinivas | Toncheva, Draga | Tosato, Sarah | Veijola, Juha | Waddington, John | Walsh, Dermot | Wang, Dai | Wang, Qiang | Webb, Bradley T | Weiser, Mark | Wildenauer, Dieter B | Williams, Nigel M | Williams, Stephanie | Witt, Stephanie H | Wolen, Aaron R | Wong, Emily HM | Wormley, Brandon K | Xi, Hualin Simon | Zai, Clement C | Zheng, Xuebin | Zimprich, Fritz | Wray, Naomi R | Stefansson, Kari | Visscher, Peter M | Adolfsson, Rolf | Andreassen, Ole A | Blackwood, Douglas HR | Bramon, Elvira | Buxbaum, Joseph D | Børglum, Anders D | Cichon, Sven | Darvasi, Ariel | Domenici, Enrico | Ehrenreich, Hannelore | Esko, Tõnu | Gejman, Pablo V | Gill, Michael | Gurling, Hugh | Hultman, Christina M | Iwata, Nakao | Jablensky, Assen V | Jönsson, Erik G | Kendler, Kenneth S | Kirov, George | Knight, Jo | Lencz, Todd | Levinson, Douglas F | Li, Qingqin S | Liu, Jianjun | Malhotra, Anil K | McCarroll, Steven A | McQuillin, Andrew | Moran, Jennifer L | Mortensen, Preben B | Mowry, Bryan J | Nöthen, Markus M | Ophoff, Roel A | Owen, Michael J | Palotie, Aarno | Pato, Carlos N | Petryshen, Tracey L | Posthuma, Danielle | Rietschel, Marcella | Riley, Brien P | Rujescu, Dan | Sham, Pak C | Sklar, Pamela | St Clair, David | Weinberger, Daniel R | Wendland, Jens R | Werge, Thomas | Daly, Mark J | Sullivan, Patrick F | O’Donovan, Michael C
Nature  2014;511(7510):421-427.
Summary
Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here, we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many findings have the potential to provide entirely novel insights into aetiology, but associations at DRD2 and multiple genes involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission highlight molecules of known and potential therapeutic relevance to schizophrenia, and are consistent with leading pathophysiological hypotheses. Independent of genes expressed in brain, associations were enriched among genes expressed in tissues that play important roles in immunity, providing support for the hypothesized link between the immune system and schizophrenia.
doi:10.1038/nature13595
PMCID: PMC4112379  PMID: 25056061
23.  The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, N-hydroxy-7-(2-naphthylthio) hepatonomide, exhibits potent antitumor activity due to cytochrome-c-release-mediated apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells 
BMC Cancer  2015;15:19.
Background
Epigenetic modifications play a critical role in the regulation of all DNA-based processes, such as transcription, repair, and replication. Inappropriate histone modifications can result in dysregulation of cell growth, leading to neoplastic transformation and cell death. Renal tumors have been shown to have a higher global methylation percentage and reduced histone acetylation. Preclinical models have revealed that histone gene modifiers and epigenetic alterations play important roles in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tumorigenesis. Recently, a novel HDAC inhibitor, N-hydroxy-7-(2-naphthylthio) heptanomide (HNHA), has been introduced as an example of a new class of anti-cancer agents. The anti-cancer activity of HNHA and the underlying mechanisms of action remain to be clarified.
Methods
The MTS assay using a panel of RCC cells was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative effects of HNHA. The established HDAC inhibitors, SAHA and TSA, were used for comparison. Western blotting analysis was performed to investigate the acetylation of histone H3 and the expression of apoptotic markers in vitro and in vivo. Subcellular fractionation was performed to evaluate expression of Bax and cytochrome c in the cytosol and mitochondria, and also translocation of cytochrome c from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. A confocal microscopic evaluation was performed to confirm inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and the nuclear translocation of cytochrome c in RCC cells.
Results
In this study, we investigated the apoptosis-inducing activity of HNHA in cultured kidney cancer cells. Apoptosis in the HNHA-treated group was induced significantly, with marked caspase activation and Bcl-2 suppression in RCC cells in vitro and in vivo. HNHA treatment caused cytochrome c release from mitochondria, which was mediated by increased Bax expression and caspase activation. HNHA also induced nuclear translocation of cytochrome c, suggesting that HNHA can induce caspase-independent nuclear apoptosis in RCC cells. An in vivo study showed that HNHA had greater anti-tumor and pro-apoptotic effects on RCC xenografts than the established HDAC inhibitors.
Conclusions
HNHA has more potent anti-tumor activity than established HDAC inhibitors. Its activities are mediated by caspase-dependent and cytochrome-c-mediated apoptosis in RCC cells. These results suggest that HNHA may offer a new therapeutic approach to RCC.
doi:10.1186/s12885-014-1003-1
PMCID: PMC4318161  PMID: 25613585
HNHA; Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor; Renal cell carcinoma (RCC); Cytochrome c; Apoptosis
24.  Highly Sensitive and Multifunctional Tactile Sensor Using Free-standing ZnO/PVDF Thin Film with Graphene Electrodes for Pressure and Temperature Monitoring 
Scientific Reports  2015;5:7887.
We demonstrate an 80-μm-thick film (which is around 15% of the thickness of the human epidermis), which is a highly sensitive hybrid functional gauge sensor, and was fabricated from poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and ZnO nanostructures with graphene electrodes. Using this film, we were able to simultaneously measure pressure and temperature in real time. The pressure was monitored from the change in the electrical resistance via the piezoresistance of the material, and the temperature was inferred based on the recovery time of the signal. Our thin film system enabled us to detect changes in pressure as small as 10 Pa which is pressure detection limit was 103-fold lower than the minimum level required for artificial skin, and to detect temperatures in the range 20–120°C.
doi:10.1038/srep07887
PMCID: PMC4298719  PMID: 25601479
25.  Asymmetric Homoenolate Additions to Acyl Phosphonates through Rational Design of a Tailored N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyst 
A highly selective NHC-catalyzed synthesis of γ-butyrolactones from the fusion of enals and α-ketophosphonates has been developed. Computational modeling of competing transition states was employed to guide a rational design strategy and achieve enhanced levels of enantioselectivity with a new tailored C1-symmetric biaryl saturated imidazolium-derived NHC catalyst. This new annulation is compatible with a wide range of acyl phosphonates and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.
doi:10.1021/ja410932t
PMCID: PMC3951019  PMID: 24299299

Results 1-25 (1112)