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1.  The transition of adult patients with childhood-onset chronic diseases from pediatric to adult healthcare systems: a survey of the perceptions of Japanese pediatricians and child health nurses 
Background
Advances in medical science have enabled many children with chronic diseases to survive to adulthood. The transition of adult patients with childhood-onset chronic diseases from pediatric to adult healthcare systems has received attention in Europe and the United States. We conducted a questionnaire survey among 41 pediatricians at pediatric hospitals and 24 nurses specializing in adolescent care to compare the perception of transition of care from pediatric to adult healthcare services for such patients.
Findings
Three-fourths of the pediatricians and all of the nurses reported that transition programs were necessary. A higher proportion of the nurses realized the necessity of transition and had already developed such programs. Both pediatricians and nurses reported that a network covering the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare services has not been established to date.
Conclusions
It has been suggested that spreading the importance of a transition program among pediatricians and developing a pediatric-adult healthcare network would contribute to the biopsychosocial well-being of adult patients with childhood-onset chronic disease.
doi:10.1186/1751-0759-6-8
PMCID: PMC3383542  PMID: 22433283
Transition of care; Pediatrician; Child health nurse; Adult patients with child-onset chronic illness; Psychosomatic problems
2.  Intracellular magnesium of obese and type 2 diabetes mellitus children 
Diabetes Therapy  2010;1(1):25-31.
Introduction
Magnesium is a critical cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions. Diabetic patients and obese subjects are often reported to have intracellular magnesium ([Mg2+]i) deficiency. We studied the change of [Mg2+]i in obese children and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) after educational intervention or treatment.
Methods
A total of 25 subjects were included: 13 with simple obesity (10 male, 3 female; mean age 16±8 years, intervention period 1.0±0.6 years), 12 with DM2 (8 male, 4 female; mean age 15±3 years, medication period 1.1±0.7 years), and 16 controls (8 male, 8 female; mean age 17±7 years). By using a fluorescent probe, mag-fura-2, we examined the basal and insulin-stimulated [Mg2+]i of platelets in the blood. Plasma leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, and resistin levels were determined with the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
Results
Mean basal [Mg2+]i was lower in the obesity (160±65 μmol/L) and DM2 groups (140±30 μmol/L) compared with the control group (330±28 μmol/L). The elevated [Mg2+]i after insulin stimulation was also lower in these two groups (420±140 μmol/L, and 330±70 μmol/L, respectively) compared with the control group (690±270 μmol/L). In the DM2 group, the basal [Mg2+]i was significantly increased after treatment, while in the obesity group, stimulated [Mg2+]i was increased after intervention.
Conclusion
Platelet [Mg2+]i increased after intervention in children with obesity or DM2.
doi:10.1007/s13300-010-0003-7
PMCID: PMC3118274  PMID: 22127671
child; education; magnesium; obesity
3.  Intracellular magnesium of obese and type 2 diabetes mellitus children 
Diabetes Therapy  2010;1(1):25-31.
Introduction
Magnesium is a critical cofactor in numerous enzymatic reactions. Diabetic patients and obese subjects are often reported to have intracellular magnesium ([Mg2+]i) deficiency. We studied the change of [Mg2+]i in obese children and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) after educational intervention or treatment.
Methods
A total of 25 subjects were included: 13 with simple obesity (10 male, 3 female; mean age 16±8 years, intervention period 1.0±0.6 years), 12 with DM2 (8 male, 4 female; mean age 15±3 years, medication period 1.1±0.7 years), and 16 controls (8 male, 8 female; mean age 17±7 years). By using a fluorescent probe, mag-fura-2, we examined the basal and insulin-stimulated [Mg2+]i of platelets in the blood. Plasma leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, and resistin levels were determined with the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
Results
Mean basal [Mg2+]i was lower in the obesity (160±65 μmol/L) and DM2 groups (140±30 μmol/L) compared with the control group (330±28 μmol/L). The elevated [Mg2+]i after insulin stimulation was also lower in these two groups (420±140 μmol/L, and 330±70 μmol/L, respectively) compared with the control group (690±270 μmol/L). In the DM2 group, the basal [Mg2+]i was significantly increased after treatment, while in the obesity group, stimulated [Mg2+]i was increased after intervention.
Conclusion
Platelet [Mg2+]i increased after intervention in children with obesity or DM2.
doi:10.1007/s13300-010-0003-7
PMCID: PMC3118274  PMID: 22127671
child; education; magnesium; obesity
4.  Turner Syndrome Associated with Ulcerative Colitis 
Clinical Pediatric Endocrinology  2006;15(3):97-100.
We report the case of a 7-yr-old girl with Turner syndrome, ulcerative colitis (UC) and coarctation of the aorta. The diagnosis of Turner syndrome was made in early infancy (karyotype analysis 45, X). Growth hormone treatment was started at 3 yr and 2 mo of age. From the age of 4 yr and 5 mo, the patient suffered from persistent diarrhea with traces of blood and intermittent abdominal discomfort. As these symptoms gradually deteriorated, she was referred to our clinic at the age of 7 yr for further evaluation. Barium enema showed aphtha and loss of the fine network pattern in the descending colon and rectum. An endoscopic examination showed ulceration, edema, friability, and erythema beginning in the rectum and extending up to the splenic flexure of the descending colon. The histology of the descending colon area showed severe stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells. These endoscopic findings and the histological findings were consistent with UC. Thus, based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having UC. Mesalazine therapy was initiated at this time. The patient is currently being treated with mesalazine (1,000 mg/day) and abdominal symptoms and bloody diarrhea have disappeared. GH therapy was not interrupted during the therapy for UC. Retrospectively, growth hormone improved growth velocity (9 cm/year) during the first year of treatment, however from the age of 4 yr, growth velocity decreased (4–5 cm/yr) in spite of the GH treatment. Conclusion: Patients with Turner syndrome and gastrointestinal symptoms should be investigated for inflammatory bowel diseases. Growth velocity is useful for evaluating the presence of inflammatory bowel diseases and other systemic diseases.
doi:10.1297/cpe.15.97
PMCID: PMC4004840  PMID: 24790328
Turner syndrome; ulcerative colitis; growth velocity; GH therapy

Results 1-4 (4)