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1.  Chromosomal protein HMGN1 modulates the expression of N-cadherin 
The FEBS journal  2005;272(22):5853-5863.
HMGN1 is a nuclear protein that binds to nucleosomes and alters the accessibility of regulatory factors to their chromatin targets. To elucidate its biological function and identify specific HMGN1 target genes, we generated Hmgn1−/− mice. DNA microarray analysis of Hmgn1+/+ and Hmgn1−/− embryonic fibroblasts identified N-cadherin as a potential HMGN1 gene target. RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed a linkage between HMGN1 expression and N-cadherin levels. In both transformed and primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), HMGN1 acted as negative regulator of N-cadherin expression. Likewise, the N-cadherin levels in early embryos of Hmgn1−/− mice were higher than those of their Hmgn1+/+ littermates. Loss of HMGN1 increased the adhesiveness, motility and aggregation potential of Hmgn1−/− MEFs, a phenotype consistent with increased levels of N-cadherin protein. Re-expression of wildtype HMGN1, but not of the mutant HMGN1 protein that does not bind to chromatin, in Hmgn1−/− MEFs, decreased the levels of N-cadherin and restored the Hmgn1+/+ phenotype. These studies demonstrate a role for HMGN1 in the regulation of specific gene expression. We suggest that in MEFs, and during early mouse development, the interaction of HMGN1 with chromatin down-regulates the expression of N-cadherin.
doi:10.1111/j.1742-4658.2005.04980.x
PMCID: PMC3730465  PMID: 16279949
HMG protein; N-cadherin; chromatin; transcription
2.  Conference Proceedings: “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks” 
Molecular genetics and metabolism  2011;104(1-2):13-22.
A December 2010 meeting, “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks,” was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole.
doi:10.1016/j.ymgme.2011.07.005
PMCID: PMC3171614  PMID: 21835664
Down syndrome; registry; database; biobank; trisomy 21
3.  Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) 
Journal of proteome research  2011;10(8):3429-3438.
Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected.
doi:10.1021/pr200021n
PMCID: PMC3169291  PMID: 21574648
4.  Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality 
Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues, it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected.
doi:10.1089/bio.2010.0036
PMCID: PMC3142856  PMID: 21826252

Results 1-5 (5)