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author:("Lang, else")
1.  Genome sequence of Frateuria aurantia type strain (Kondô 67T), a xanthomonade isolated from Lilium auratium Lindl. 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2013;9(1):83-92.
Frateuria aurantia (ex Kondô and Ameyama 1958) Swings et al. 1980 is a member of the bispecific genus Frateuria in the family Xanthomonadaceae, which is already heavily targeted for non-type strain genome sequencing. Strain Kondô 67T was initially (1958) identified as a member of ‘Acetobacter aurantius’, a name that was not considered for the approved list. Kondô 67T was therefore later designated as the type strain of the newly proposed acetogenic species Frateuria aurantia. The strain is of interest because of its triterpenoids (hopane family). F. aurantia Kondô 67T is the first member of the genus Frateura whose genome sequence has been deciphered, and here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 3,603,458-bp long chromosome with its 3,200 protein-coding and 88 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.4338002
PMCID: PMC3910546  PMID: 24501647
strictly aerobic; motile; rod-shaped; acetogenic; mesophilic; ‘Acetobacter aurantius’; Xanthomonadaceae; GEBA
2.  Polynucleobacter rarus sp. nov., a free-living planktonic bacterium isolated from an acidic lake 
The heterotrophic, aerobic, facultatively anaerobic under denitrifying conditions, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-motile strain MT-CBb6A5T, which was isolated from an acidic lake located in Wisconsin (USA), was characterized. The strain grew on NSY medium over a temperature range of 15–30 °C and a NaCl range of 0.0–0.3 % (w/v). The predominant fatty acids were C16 : 0,C18 : 1ω7c, 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c, feature 3 (including C16 : 1ω7c), and feature 2 (including C14 : 0 3-OH). The DNA G+C content of the strain was 40.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis as well as strong similarities in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits indicated the affiliation with the genus Polynucleobacter. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values with the two described species of the genus Polynucleobacter ranged from 95.6 to 96.0 %. The strain differs from the two described species of the genus Polynucleobacter in the ability to assimilate oxalic and glycolic acids, and in the presence of the fatty acids C15 : 1ω8c and C16 : 0 3-OH as well as in quantitative differences in fatty acid composition. It has to be assumed that the strain shares with other free-living bacteria of the genus Polynucleobacter a planktonic lifestyle in the water column of freshwater habitats. Based on the phylogeny revealed and the chemotaxonomic and phenotypic differences from Polynucleobacter necessarius and Polynucleobacter cosmopolitanus, we propose to establish the novel species Polynucleobacter rarus sp. nov. with the type strain MT-CBb6A5T (=DSM 21648T =CIP 109928T).
doi:10.1099/ijs.0.017350-0
PMCID: PMC3280894  PMID: 20435748
3.  A phylogeny-driven genomic encyclopaedia of Bacteria and Archaea 
Nature  2009;462(7276):1056-1060.
Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal genomes has revolutionized our understanding of the many roles played by microorganisms1. There are now nearly 1,000 completed bacterial and archaeal genomes available2, most of which were chosen for sequencing on the basis of their physiology. As a result, the perspective provided by the currently available genomes is limited by a highly biased phylogenetic distribution3–5. To explore the value added by choosing microbial genomes for sequencing on the basis of their evolutionary relationships, we have sequenced and analysed the genomes of 56 culturable species of Bacteria and Archaea selected to maximize phylogenetic coverage. Analysis of these genomes demonstrated pronounced benefits (compared to an equivalent set of genomes randomly selected from the existing database) in diverse areas including the reconstruction of phylogenetic history, the discovery of new protein families and biological properties, and the prediction of functions for known genes from other organisms. Our results strongly support the need for systematic ‘phylogenomic’ efforts to compile a phylogeny-driven ‘Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea’ in order to derive maximum knowledge from existing microbial genome data as well as from genome sequences to come.
doi:10.1038/nature08656
PMCID: PMC3073058  PMID: 20033048
4.  Complete genome sequence of Weeksella virosa type strain (9751T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2011;4(1):81-90.
Weeksella virosa Holmes et al. 1987 is the sole member and type species of the genus Weeksella which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. Twenty-nine isolates, collected from clinical specimens provided the basis for the taxon description. While the species seems to be a saprophyte of the mucous membranes of healthy man and warm-blooded animals a causal relationship with disease has been reported in a few instances. Except for the ability to produce indole and to hydrolyze Tween and proteins such as casein and gelatin, this aerobic, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterial species is metabolically inert in most traditional biochemical tests. The 2,272,954 bp long genome with its 2,105 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.1603927
PMCID: PMC3072086  PMID: 21475590
strictly aerobic; slimy; Gram-negative; lyses proteins; inhabitant of mucosa; Flavobacteriaceae; GEBA
5.  Complete genome sequence of Sulfurimonas autotrophica type strain (OK10T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2010;3(2):194-202.
Sulfurimonas autotrophica Inagaki et al. 2003 is the type species of the genus Sulfurimonas. This genus is of interest because of its significant contribution to the global sulfur cycle as it oxidizes sulfur compounds to sulfate and by its apparent habitation of deep-sea hydrothermal and marine sulfidic environments as potential ecological niche. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second complete genome sequence of the genus Sulfurimonas and the 15th genome in the family Helicobacteraceae. The 2,153,198 bp long genome with its 2,165 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.1173118
PMCID: PMC3035374  PMID: 21304749
mesophilic; facultatively anaerobic; sulfur metabolism; deep-sea hydrothermal vents; spermidine; Gram-negative; Helicobacteriaceae; Epsilonproteobacteria; GEBA
8.  Complete genome sequence of Denitrovibrio acetiphilus type strain (N2460T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2010;2(3):270-279.
Denitrovibrio acetiphilus Myhr and Torsvik 2000 is the type species of the genus Denitrovibrio in the bacterial family Deferribacteraceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because there are only six genera described in the family Deferribacteraceae. D. acetiphilus was isolated as a representative of a population reducing nitrate to ammonia in a laboratory column simulating the conditions in off-shore oil recovery fields. When nitrate was added to this column undesirable hydrogen sulfide production was stopped because the sulfate reducing populations were superseded by these nitrate reducing bacteria. Here we describe the features of this marine, mesophilic, obligately anaerobic organism respiring by nitrate reduction, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the second complete genome sequence of the order Deferribacterales and the class Deferribacteres, which is the sole class in the phylum Deferribacteres. The 3,222,077 bp genome with its 3,034 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.892105
PMCID: PMC3035293  PMID: 21304711
dissimilatory nitrate-reducer; mesophile; free-living; marine; obligately anaerobic; motile; Deferribacteraceae; Deferribacteres; GEBA
9.  Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2010;2(2):149-157.
Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as an energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here, we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2,291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.671209
PMCID: PMC3035281  PMID: 21304697
anaerobic; microaerobic; sulfur reduction; dissimilatory nitrate reduction; Gram-negative; motile; Campylobacteraceae; GEBA
10.  Complete genome sequence of Haliangium ochraceum type strain (SMP-2T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2010;2(1):96-106.
Haliangium ochraceum Fudou et al. 2002 is the type species of the genus Haliangium in the myxococcal family ‘Haliangiaceae’. Members of the genus Haliangium are the first halophilic myxobacterial taxa described. The cells of the species follow a multicellular lifestyle in highly organized biofilms, called swarms, they decompose bacterial and yeast cells as most myxobacteria do. The fruiting bodies contain particularly small coccoid myxospores. H. ochraceum encodes the first actin homologue identified in a bacterial genome. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the myxococcal suborder Nannocystineae, and the 9,446,314 bp long single replicon genome with its 6,898 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.69.1277
PMCID: PMC3035250  PMID: 21304682
aerobic; gliding; myxobacteria; fruiting bodies; moderately halophilic; mesophile; Gram-negative; decomposition of bacterial and yeast cells; Myxococcales; GEBA
11.  Complete genome sequence of Dyadobacter fermentans type strain (NS114T) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2009;1(2):133-140.
Dyadobacter fermentans (Chelius and Triplett, 2000) is the type species of the genus Dyadobacter. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Cytophagaceae, a very diverse family within the order ‘Sphingobacteriales’. D. fermentans has a mainly respiratory metabolism, stains Gram-negative, is non-motile and oxidase and catalase positive. It is characterized by the production of cell filaments in aging cultures, a flexirubin-like pigment and its ability to ferment glucose, which is almost unique in the aerobically living members of this taxonomically difficult family. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and its annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the sphingobacterial genus Dyadobacter, and this 6,967,790 bp long single replicon genome with its 5804 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.19262
PMCID: PMC3035232  PMID: 21304649
mesophile; free-living; non-pathogenic; aerobic; chains of rods; Cytophagaceae
12.  Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT) 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2009;1(1):38-45.
Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
doi:10.4056/sigs.1463
PMCID: PMC3035218  PMID: 21304635
Moderate thermophile; ferrous-iron-oxidizing; acidophile; Acidomicrobiales
13.  PMD2HD – A web tool aligning a PubMed search results page with the local German Cancer Research Centre library collection 
Background
Web-based searching is the accepted contemporary mode of retrieving relevant literature, and retrieving as many full text articles as possible is a typical prerequisite for research success. In most cases only a proportion of references will be directly accessible as digital reprints through displayed links. A large number of references, however, have to be verified in library catalogues and, depending on their availability, are accessible as print holdings or by interlibrary loan request.
Methods
The problem of verifying local print holdings from an initial retrieval set of citations can be solved using Z39.50, an ANSI protocol for interactively querying library information systems. Numerous systems include Z39.50 interfaces and therefore can process Z39.50 interactive requests. However, the programmed query interaction command structure is non-intuitive and inaccessible to the average biomedical researcher. For the typical user, it is necessary to implement the protocol within a tool that hides and handles Z39.50 syntax, presenting a comfortable user interface.
Results
PMD2HD is a web tool implementing Z39.50 to provide an appropriately functional and usable interface to integrate into the typical workflow that follows an initial PubMed literature search, providing users with an immediate asset to assist in the most tedious step in literature retrieval, checking for subscription holdings against a local online catalogue.
Conclusion
PMD2HD can facilitate literature access considerably with respect to the time and cost of manual comparisons of search results with local catalogue holdings. The example presented in this article is related to the library system and collections of the German Cancer Research Centre. However, the PMD2HD software architecture and use of common Z39.50 protocol commands allow for transfer to a broad range of scientific libraries using Z39.50-compatible library information systems.
doi:10.1186/1742-5581-2-4
PMCID: PMC1187866  PMID: 15982415
14.  Do we need a Unique Scientist ID for publications in biomedicine? 
Background
The PubMed database contains nearly 15 million references from more than 4,800 biomedical journals. In general, authors of scientific articles are addressed by their last name and forename initial.
Discussion
In general, names can be too common and not unique enough to be search criteria. Today, Ph.D. students, other researchers and women publish scientific work. A person may not only have one name but several names and publish under each name. A Unique Scientist ID could help to address people in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. As a starting point, perhaps PubMed could generate and manage such a scientist ID.
Summary
A Unique Scientist ID would improve knowledge management in science. Unfortunately in some of the publications, and then within the online databases, only one letter abbreviates the author's forename. A common name with only one initial could retrieve pertinent citations, but include many false drops (retrieval matching searched criteria but indisputably irrelevant).
doi:10.1186/1742-5581-2-1
PMCID: PMC1079791  PMID: 15784146
15.  SWEET-DB: an attempt to create annotated data collections for carbohydrates 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):405-408.
Complex carbohydrates are known as mediators of complex cellular events. Concerning their structural diversity, their potential of information content is several orders of magnitude higher in a short sequence than any other biological macromolecule. SWEET-DB (http://www.dkfz.de/spec2/sweetdb/) is an attempt to use modern web techniques to annotate and/or cross-reference carbohydrate-related data collections which allow glycoscientists to find important data for compounds of interest in a compact and well-structured representation. Currently, reference data taken from three data sources can be retrieved for a given carbohydrate (sub)structure. The sources are CarbBank structures and literature references (linked to NCBI PubMed service), NMR data taken from SugaBase and 3D co-ordinates generated with SWEET-II. The main purpose of SWEET-DB is to enable an easy access to all data stored for one carbohydrate structure entering a complete sequence or parts thereof. Access to SWEET-DB contents is provided with the help of separate input spreadsheets for (sub)structures, bibliographic data, general structural data like molecular weight, NMR spectra and biological data. A detailed online tutorial is available at http://www.dkfz.de/spec2/sweetdb/nar/.
PMCID: PMC99123  PMID: 11752350

Results 1-15 (15)