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1.  The gene normalization task in BioCreative III 
BMC Bioinformatics  2011;12(Suppl 8):S2.
Background
We report the Gene Normalization (GN) challenge in BioCreative III where participating teams were asked to return a ranked list of identifiers of the genes detected in full-text articles. For training, 32 fully and 500 partially annotated articles were prepared. A total of 507 articles were selected as the test set. Due to the high annotation cost, it was not feasible to obtain gold-standard human annotations for all test articles. Instead, we developed an Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm approach for choosing a small number of test articles for manual annotation that were most capable of differentiating team performance. Moreover, the same algorithm was subsequently used for inferring ground truth based solely on team submissions. We report team performance on both gold standard and inferred ground truth using a newly proposed metric called Threshold Average Precision (TAP-k).
Results
We received a total of 37 runs from 14 different teams for the task. When evaluated using the gold-standard annotations of the 50 articles, the highest TAP-k scores were 0.3297 (k=5), 0.3538 (k=10), and 0.3535 (k=20), respectively. Higher TAP-k scores of 0.4916 (k=5, 10, 20) were observed when evaluated using the inferred ground truth over the full test set. When combining team results using machine learning, the best composite system achieved TAP-k scores of 0.3707 (k=5), 0.4311 (k=10), and 0.4477 (k=20) on the gold standard, representing improvements of 12.4%, 21.8%, and 26.6% over the best team results, respectively.
Conclusions
By using full text and being species non-specific, the GN task in BioCreative III has moved closer to a real literature curation task than similar tasks in the past and presents additional challenges for the text mining community, as revealed in the overall team results. By evaluating teams using the gold standard, we show that the EM algorithm allows team submissions to be differentiated while keeping the manual annotation effort feasible. Using the inferred ground truth we show measures of comparative performance between teams. Finally, by comparing team rankings on gold standard vs. inferred ground truth, we further demonstrate that the inferred ground truth is as effective as the gold standard for detecting good team performance.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-S8-S2
PMCID: PMC3269937  PMID: 22151901
2.  BioCreative III interactive task: an overview 
BMC Bioinformatics  2011;12(Suppl 8):S4.
Background
The BioCreative challenge evaluation is a community-wide effort for evaluating text mining and information extraction systems applied to the biological domain. The biocurator community, as an active user of biomedical literature, provides a diverse and engaged end user group for text mining tools. Earlier BioCreative challenges involved many text mining teams in developing basic capabilities relevant to biological curation, but they did not address the issues of system usage, insertion into the workflow and adoption by curators. Thus in BioCreative III (BC-III), the InterActive Task (IAT) was introduced to address the utility and usability of text mining tools for real-life biocuration tasks. To support the aims of the IAT in BC-III, involvement of both developers and end users was solicited, and the development of a user interface to address the tasks interactively was requested.
Results
A User Advisory Group (UAG) actively participated in the IAT design and assessment. The task focused on gene normalization (identifying gene mentions in the article and linking these genes to standard database identifiers), gene ranking based on the overall importance of each gene mentioned in the article, and gene-oriented document retrieval (identifying full text papers relevant to a selected gene). Six systems participated and all processed and displayed the same set of articles. The articles were selected based on content known to be problematic for curation, such as ambiguity of gene names, coverage of multiple genes and species, or introduction of a new gene name. Members of the UAG curated three articles for training and assessment purposes, and each member was assigned a system to review. A questionnaire related to the interface usability and task performance (as measured by precision and recall) was answered after systems were used to curate articles. Although the limited number of articles analyzed and users involved in the IAT experiment precluded rigorous quantitative analysis of the results, a qualitative analysis provided valuable insight into some of the problems encountered by users when using the systems. The overall assessment indicates that the system usability features appealed to most users, but the system performance was suboptimal (mainly due to low accuracy in gene normalization). Some of the issues included failure of species identification and gene name ambiguity in the gene normalization task leading to an extensive list of gene identifiers to review, which, in some cases, did not contain the relevant genes. The document retrieval suffered from the same shortfalls. The UAG favored achieving high performance (measured by precision and recall), but strongly recommended the addition of features that facilitate the identification of correct gene and its identifier, such as contextual information to assist in disambiguation.
Discussion
The IAT was an informative exercise that advanced the dialog between curators and developers and increased the appreciation of challenges faced by each group. A major conclusion was that the intended users should be actively involved in every phase of software development, and this will be strongly encouraged in future tasks. The IAT Task provides the first steps toward the definition of metrics and functional requirements that are necessary for designing a formal evaluation of interactive curation systems in the BioCreative IV challenge.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-S8-S4
PMCID: PMC3269939  PMID: 22151968
3.  Medie and Info-pubmed: 2010 update 
BMC Bioinformatics  2010;11(Suppl 5):P7.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-S5-P7
PMCID: PMC2956400
4.  Building a high-quality sense inventory for improved abbreviation disambiguation 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(9):1246-1253.
Motivation: The ultimate goal of abbreviation management is to disambiguate every occurrence of an abbreviation into its expanded form (concept or sense). To collect expanded forms for abbreviations, previous studies have recognized abbreviations and their expanded forms in parenthetical expressions of bio-medical texts. However, expanded forms extracted by abbreviation recognition are mixtures of concepts/senses and their term variations. Consequently, a list of expanded forms should be structured into a sense inventory, which provides possible concepts or senses for abbreviation disambiguation.
Results: A sense inventory is a key to robust management of abbreviations. Therefore, we present a supervised approach for clustering expanded forms. The experimental result reports 0.915 F1 score in clustering expanded forms. We then investigate the possibility of conflicts of protein and gene names with abbreviations. Finally, an experiment of abbreviation disambiguation on the sense inventory yielded 0.984 accuracy and 0.986 F1 score using the dataset obtained from MEDLINE abstracts.
Availability: The sense inventory and disambiguator of abbreviations are accessible at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/software/acromine/ and http://www.nactem.ac.uk/software/acromine_disambiguation/
Contact: okazaki@chokkan.org
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq129
PMCID: PMC2859134  PMID: 20360059

Results 1-4 (4)