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author:("Hach, fara")
1.  mrsFAST-Ultra: a compact, SNP-aware mapper for high performance sequencing applications 
Nucleic Acids Research  2014;42(Web Server issue):W494-W500.
High throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for processing and downstream analysis. While tools that report the ‘best’ mapping location of each read provide a fast way to process HTS data, they are not suitable for many types of downstream analysis such as structural variation detection, where it is important to report multiple mapping loci for each read. For this purpose we introduce mrsFAST-Ultra, a fast, cache oblivious, SNP-aware aligner that can handle the multi-mapping of HTS reads very efficiently. mrsFAST-Ultra improves mrsFAST, our first cache oblivious read aligner capable of handling multi-mapping reads, through new and compact index structures that reduce not only the overall memory usage but also the number of CPU operations per alignment. In fact the size of the index generated by mrsFAST-Ultra is 10 times smaller than that of mrsFAST. As importantly, mrsFAST-Ultra introduces new features such as being able to (i) obtain the best mapping loci for each read, and (ii) return all reads that have at most n mapping loci (within an error threshold), together with these loci, for any user specified n. Furthermore, mrsFAST-Ultra is SNP-aware, i.e. it can map reads to reference genome while discounting the mismatches that occur at common SNP locations provided by db-SNP; this significantly increases the number of reads that can be mapped to the reference genome. Notice that all of the above features are implemented within the index structure and are not simple post-processing steps and thus are performed highly efficiently. Finally, mrsFAST-Ultra utilizes multiple available cores and processors and can be tuned for various memory settings. Our results show that mrsFAST-Ultra is roughly five times faster than its predecessor mrsFAST. In comparison to newly enhanced popular tools such as Bowtie2, it is more sensitive (it can report 10 times or more mappings per read) and much faster (six times or more) in the multi-mapping mode. Furthermore, mrsFAST-Ultra has an index size of 2GB for the entire human reference genome, which is roughly half of that of Bowtie2. mrsFAST-Ultra is open source and it can be accessed at http://mrsfast.sourceforge.net.
doi:10.1093/nar/gku370
PMCID: PMC4086126  PMID: 24810850
2.  SCALCE: boosting sequence compression algorithms using locally consistent encoding 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(23):3051-3057.
Motivation: The high throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for the computational infrastructure. Data management, storage and analysis have become major logistical obstacles for those adopting the new platforms. The requirement for large investment for this purpose almost signalled the end of the Sequence Read Archive hosted at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which holds most of the sequence data generated world wide. Currently, most HTS data are compressed through general purpose algorithms such as gzip. These algorithms are not designed for compressing data generated by the HTS platforms; for example, they do not take advantage of the specific nature of genomic sequence data, that is, limited alphabet size and high similarity among reads. Fast and efficient compression algorithms designed specifically for HTS data should be able to address some of the issues in data management, storage and communication. Such algorithms would also help with analysis provided they offer additional capabilities such as random access to any read and indexing for efficient sequence similarity search. Here we present SCALCE, a ‘boosting’ scheme based on Locally Consistent Parsing technique, which reorganizes the reads in a way that results in a higher compression speed and compression rate, independent of the compression algorithm in use and without using a reference genome.
Results: Our tests indicate that SCALCE can improve the compression rate achieved through gzip by a factor of 4.19—when the goal is to compress the reads alone. In fact, on SCALCE reordered reads, gzip running time can improve by a factor of 15.06 on a standard PC with a single core and 6 GB memory. Interestingly even the running time of SCALCE + gzip improves that of gzip alone by a factor of 2.09. When compared with the recently published BEETL, which aims to sort the (inverted) reads in lexicographic order for improving bzip2, SCALCE + gzip provides up to 2.01 times better compression while improving the running time by a factor of 5.17. SCALCE also provides the option to compress the quality scores as well as the read names, in addition to the reads themselves. This is achieved by compressing the quality scores through order-3 Arithmetic Coding (AC) and the read names through gzip through the reordering SCALCE provides on the reads. This way, in comparison with gzip compression of the unordered FASTQ files (including reads, read names and quality scores), SCALCE (together with gzip and arithmetic encoding) can provide up to 3.34 improvement in the compression rate and 1.26 improvement in running time.
Availability: Our algorithm, SCALCE (Sequence Compression Algorithm using Locally Consistent Encoding), is implemented in C++ with both gzip and bzip2 compression options. It also supports multithreading when gzip option is selected, and the pigz binary is available. It is available at http://scalce.sourceforge.net.
Contact: fhach@cs.sfu.ca or cenk@cs.sfu.ca
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts593
PMCID: PMC3509486  PMID: 23047557
3.  Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer† 
The Journal of pathology  2012;227(1):53-61.
Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology.
doi:10.1002/path.3987
PMCID: PMC3768138  PMID: 22294438
RNA sequencing; DNA sequencing; prostate cancer; fusion genes; neuroendocrine; personalized medicine; cancer genetics
4.  From sequence to molecular pathology, and a mechanism driving the neuroendocrine phenotype in prostate cancer 
The Journal of pathology  2012;227(3):286-297.
The current paradigm of cancer care relies on predictive nomograms which integrate detailed histopathology with clinical data. However, when predictions fail, the consequences for patients are often catastrophic, especially in prostate cancer where nomograms influence the decision to therapeutically intervene. We hypothesized that the high dimensional data afforded by massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is not only capable of providing biological insights, but may aid molecular pathology of prostate tumours. We assembled a cohort of six patients with high-risk disease, and performed deep RNA and shallow DNA sequencing in primary tumours and matched metastases where available. Our analysis identified copy number abnormalities, accurately profiled gene expression levels, and detected both differential splicing and expressed fusion genes. We revealed occult and potentially dormant metastases, unambiguously supporting the patients’ clinical history, and implicated the REST transcriptional complex in the development of neuroendocrine prostate cancer, validating this finding in a large independent cohort. We massively expand on the number of novel fusion genes described in prostate cancer; provide fresh evidence for the growing link between fusion gene aetiology and gene expression profiles; and show the utility of fusion genes for molecular pathology. Finally, we identified chromothripsis in a patient with chronic prostatitis. Our results provide a strong foundation for further development of MPS-based molecular pathology.
doi:10.1002/path.4047
PMCID: PMC3659819  PMID: 22553170
molecular pathology; massively parallel sequencing; neuroendocrine prostate cancer; REST repressor; chromothripsis
6.  Sensitive and fast mapping of di-base encoded reads 
Bioinformatics  2011;27(14):1915-1921.
Motivation: Discovering variation among high-throughput sequenced genomes relies on efficient and effective mapping of sequence reads. The speed, sensitivity and accuracy of read mapping are crucial to determining the full spectrum of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) as well as structural variants (SVs) in the donor genomes analyzed.
Results: We present drFAST, a read mapper designed for di-base encoded ‘color-space’ sequences generated with the AB SOLiD platform. drFAST is specially designed for better delineation of structural variants, including segmental duplications, and is able to return all possible map locations and underlying sequence variation of short reads within a user-specified distance threshold. We show that drFAST is more sensitive in comparison to all commonly used aligners such as Bowtie, BFAST and SHRiMP. drFAST is also faster than both BFAST and SHRiMP and achieves a mapping speed comparable to Bowtie.
Availability: The source code for drFAST is available at http://drfast.sourceforge.net
Contact: calkan@u.washington.edu
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr303
PMCID: PMC3129524  PMID: 21586516
7.  Dissect: detection and characterization of novel structural alterations in transcribed sequences 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(12):i179-i187.
Motivation: Computational identification of genomic structural variants via high-throughput sequencing is an important problem for which a number of highly sophisticated solutions have been recently developed. With the advent of high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq), the problem of identifying structural alterations in the transcriptome is now attracting significant attention.
In this article, we introduce two novel algorithmic formulations for identifying transcriptomic structural variants through aligning transcripts to the reference genome under the consideration of such variation. The first formulation is based on a nucleotide-level alignment model; a second, potentially faster formulation is based on chaining fragments shared between each transcript and the reference genome. Based on these formulations, we introduce a novel transcriptome-to-genome alignment tool, Dissect (DIScovery of Structural Alteration Event Containing Transcripts), which can identify and characterize transcriptomic events such as duplications, inversions, rearrangements and fusions. Dissect is suitable for whole transcriptome structural variation discovery problems involving sufficiently long reads or accurately assembled contigs.
Results: We tested Dissect on simulated transcripts altered via structural events, as well as assembled RNA-Seq contigs from human prostate cancer cell line C4-2. Our results indicate that Dissect has high sensitivity and specificity in identifying structural alteration events in simulated transcripts as well as uncovering novel structural alterations in cancer transcriptomes.
Availability: Dissect is available for public use at: http://dissect-trans.sourceforge.net
Contact: denizy@mit.edu; fhach@cs.sfu.ca; cenk@cs.sfu.ca
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts214
PMCID: PMC3371846  PMID: 22689759
9.  Next-generation VariationHunter: combinatorial algorithms for transposon insertion discovery 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(12):i350-i357.
Recent years have witnessed an increase in research activity for the detection of structural variants (SVs) and their association to human disease. The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies make it possible to extend the scope of structural variation studies to a point previously unimaginable as exemplified by the 1000 Genomes Project. Although various computational methods have been described for the detection of SVs, no such algorithm is yet fully capable of discovering transposon insertions, a very important class of SVs to the study of human evolution and disease. In this article, we provide a complete and novel formulation to discover both loci and classes of transposons inserted into genomes sequenced with high-throughput sequencing technologies. In addition, we also present ‘conflict resolution’ improvements to our earlier combinatorial SV detection algorithm (VariationHunter) by taking the diploid nature of the human genome into consideration. We test our algorithms with simulated data from the Venter genome (HuRef) and are able to discover >85% of transposon insertion events with precision of >90%. We also demonstrate that our conflict resolution algorithm (denoted as VariationHunter-CR) outperforms current state of the art (such as original VariationHunter, BreakDancer and MoDIL) algorithms when tested on the genome of the Yoruba African individual (NA18507).
Availability: The implementation of algorithm is available at http://compbio.cs.sfu.ca/strvar.htm.
Contact: eee@gs.washington.edu; cenk@cs.sfu.ca
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq216
PMCID: PMC2881400  PMID: 20529927

Results 1-9 (9)