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1.  Computational approaches to understanding protein aggregation in neurodegeneration 
The generation of toxic non-native protein conformers has emerged as a unifying thread among disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Atomic-level detail regarding dynamical changes that facilitate protein aggregation, as well as the structural features of large-scale ordered aggregates and soluble non-native oligomers, would contribute significantly to current understanding of these complex phenomena and offer potential strategies for inhibiting formation of cytotoxic species. However, experimental limitations often preclude the acquisition of high-resolution structural and mechanistic information for aggregating systems. Computational methods, particularly those combine both all-atom and coarse-grained simulations to cover a wide range of time and length scales, have thus emerged as crucial tools for investigating protein aggregation. Here we review the current state of computational methodology for the study of protein self-assembly, with a focus on the application of these methods toward understanding of protein aggregates in human neurodegenerative disorders.
doi:10.1093/jmcb/mju007
PMCID: PMC3995224  PMID: 24620031
protein aggregation; molecular dynamics; protein folding; neurodegeneration
2.  Statistical analysis of SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling 
Biochemistry  2013;52(4):596-599.
The ability to predict RNA secondary structure is fundamental for understanding and manipulating RNA function. The structural information obtained from selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) experiments greatly improves the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction. Recently, Das and colleagues [Kladwang et al., Biochemistry 50:8049 (2011)] proposed a “bootstrapping” approach to estimate the variance and helix-by-helix confidence levels of predicted secondary structures based on resampling (randomizing and summing) the measured SHAPE data. We show that the specific resampling approach described by Kladwang et al. introduces systematic errors and underestimates confidence in secondary structure prediction using SHAPE data. Instead, a leave-data-out jackknife approach better estimates the influence of a given experimental dataset on SHAPE-directed secondary structure modeling. Even when 35% of the data were left out in the jackknife approach, the confidence levels of SHAPE-directed secondary structure prediction were significantly higher than those calculated by Das and colleagues using bootstrapping. Helix confidence levels were thus significantly underestimated in the recent study, and resampling approach implemented by Kladwang et al. is not an appropriate metric for assigning confidences in SHAPE-directed secondary structure modeling.
doi:10.1021/bi300756s
PMCID: PMC3558531  PMID: 23286327
3.  Local unfolding of Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase monomer determines the morphology of fibrillar aggregates 
Journal of Molecular Biology  2011;421(4-5):548-560.
Aggregation of Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) is often found in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients. The fibrillar aggregates formed by wildtype and various disease-associated mutants have recently been found to have distinct cores and morphologies. Previous computational and experimental studies of wildtype SOD1 suggest that the apo-monomer, highly aggregation-prone, displays substantial local unfolding dynamics. The residual folded structure of locally unfolded apoSOD1 corresponds to peptide segments forming the aggregation core as identified by a combination of proteolysis and mass spectroscopy. Therefore, we hypothesize that the destabilization of apoSOD1 caused by various mutations leads to distinct local unfolding dynamics. The partially unfolded structure, exposing the hydrophobic core and backbone hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, is prone to aggregate. The peptide segments in the residual folded structures form the “building block” for aggregation, which in turn determines the morphology of the aggregates. To test this hypothesis, we apply a multiscale simulation approach to study the aggregation of three typical SOD1 variants: wildtype, G37R, and I149T. Each of these SOD1 variants has distinct peptide segments forming the core structure and features different aggregate morphologies. We perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the conformational dynamics of apoSOD1 monomer, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the aggregation of partially unfolded SOD1 monomers. Our computational studies of monomer local unfolding and the aggregation of different SOD1 variants are consistent with experiments, supporting the hypothesis of the formation of aggregation “building blocks” via apo-monomer local unfolding as the mechanism of SOD1 fibrillar aggregation.
doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2011.12.029
PMCID: PMC3320695  PMID: 22210350
SOD1 misfolding and aggregation; fibrillar aggregate; aggregation building block; molecular dynamics; multiscale modeling
4.  1Energetic and structural basis for activation of the epithelial sodium channel by matriptase 
Biochemistry  2012;51(16):3460-3469.
Limited proteolysis, accomplished by endopeptidases, is a ubiquitous phenomenon underlying the regulation and activation of many enzymes, receptors and other proteins synthesized as inactive precursors. Serine proteases are one of the largest and conserved families of endopeptidases involved in diverse cellular activities including wound healing, blood coagulation and immune responses. Heteromeric α,β,γ-epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) associated with diseases like cystic fibrosis and Liddle’s syndrome, are irreversibly stimulated by membrane-anchored proteases (MAPs) and furin-like convertases. Matriptase/Channel activating protease-3 (CAP3) is one of the several MAPs that potently activate ENaC. Despite identification of protease cleavage sites, the basis for enhanced susceptibility of α- and γ-ENaC to proteases remains elusive. Here, we elucidate the energetic and structural bases for activation of ENaC by CAP3. We find a region near the γ-ENaC furin site that is previously unidentified as a critical cleavage site for CAP3-mediated stimulation. We also report that CAP3 mediates cleavage of ENaC at basic residues downstream of the furin site. Our results indicate that surface proteases alone are sufficient to fully activate uncleaved ENaC, and explain how ENaC in epithelia expressing surface-active proteases can appear refractory to soluble proteases. Our results support a model in which proteases prime ENaC for activation by cleaving at the furin site, and cleavage at downstream sites is accomplished by membrane surface proteases or extracellular soluble proteases. Based on our results, we propose a dynamics-driven “anglerfish” mechanism that explains less stringent sequence requirements for substrate recognition and cleavage by matriptase compared to furin.
doi:10.1021/bi2014773
PMCID: PMC3404201  PMID: 22471557
ENaC; serine endopeptidase; Xenopus; voltage clamp; discrete molecular dynamics
5.  Physical Microscopic Model of Proteins Under Force 
The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B  2012;116(23):6806-6809.
Nature has evolved proteins to counter-act forces applied on living cells, and designed proteins that can sense forces. One can appreciate Nature’s ingenuity in evolving these proteins to be highly sensitive to force and to have a high dynamic force range at which they operate. To achieve this level of sensitivity, many of these proteins are comprised of multiple domains and linking peptides connecting these domain, each of them have their own force response regimes. Here, using a simple model of a protein, we address the question of how each individual domain responds to force. We also ask how multi-domain proteins respond to forces. We find that the end-to-end distance of individual domains under force scales linearly with force. In multi-domain proteins, we find that the force response has a rich range: at low force, extension is predominantly governed by “weaker” linking peptides or domain intermediates, while at higher force, the extension is governed by unfolding of individual domains. Overall, the force extension curve comprises multiple sigmoidal transition governed by unfolding of linking peptides and domains. Our study provides a basic framework for the understanding of protein response to force, and allows for interpretation experiments in which force is used to study the mechanical properties of multi-domain proteins.
doi:10.1021/jp212543m
PMCID: PMC3376209  PMID: 22375559
force; mechano-sensing proteins; multi-domain proteins
6.  Cheminformatics Meets Molecular Mechanics: A Combined Application of Knowledge-based Pose Scoring and Physical Force Field-based Hit Scoring Functions Improves the Accuracy of Structure-Based Virtual Screening 
Poor performance of scoring functions is a well-known bottleneck in structure-based virtual screening, which is most frequently manifested in the scoring functions’ inability to discriminate between true ligands versus known non-binders (therefore designated as binding decoys). This deficiency leads to a large number of false positive hits resulting from virtual screening. We have hypothesized that filtering out or penalizing docking poses recognized as non-native (i.e., pose decoys) should improve the performance of virtual screening in terms of improved identification of true binders. Using several concepts from the field of cheminformatics, we have developed a novel approach to identifying pose decoys from an ensemble of poses generated by computational docking procedures. We demonstrate that the use of target-specific pose (-scoring) filter in combination with a physical force field-based scoring function (MedusaScore) leads to significant improvement of hit rates in virtual screening studies for 12 of the 13 benchmark sets from the clustered version of the Database of Useful Decoys (DUD). This new hybrid scoring function outperforms several conventional structure-based scoring functions, including XSCORE∷HMSCORE, ChemScore, PLP, and Chemgauss3, in six out of 13 data sets at early stage of VS (up 1% decoys of the screening database). We compare our hybrid method with several novel VS methods that were recently reported to have good performances on the same DUD data sets. We find that the retrieved ligands using our method are chemically more diverse in comparison with two ligand-based methods (FieldScreen and FLAP∷LBX). We also compare our method with FLAP∷RBLB, a high-performance VS method that also utilizes both the receptor and the cognate ligand structures. Interestingly, we find that the top ligands retrieved using our method are highly complementary to those retrieved using FLAP∷RBLB, hinting effective directions for best VS applications. We suggest that this integrative virtual screening approach combining cheminformatics and molecular mechanics methodologies may be applied to a broad variety of protein targets to improve the outcome of structure-based drug discovery studies.
doi:10.1021/ci2002507
PMCID: PMC3264743  PMID: 22017385
7.  Structural and dynamic determinants of protein-peptide recognition 
Structure (London, England : 1993)  2011;19(12):1837-1845.
Summary
Protein-peptide interactions play important roles in many cellular processes, including signal transduction, trafficking, and immune recognition. Protein conformational changes upon binding, an ill-defined peptide binding surface, and the large number of peptide degrees of freedom make the prediction of protein-peptide interactions particularly challenging. To address these challenges, we perform rapid molecular dynamics simulations in order to examine the energetic and dynamic aspects of protein-peptide binding. We find that, in most cases, we recapitulate the native binding sites and native-like poses of protein-peptide complexes. Inclusion of electrostatic interactions in simulations significantly improves the prediction accuracy. Our results also highlight the importance of protein conformational flexibility, especially side-chain movement, which allows the peptide to optimize its conformation. Our findings not only demonstrate the importance of sufficient sampling of the protein and peptide conformations, but also reveal the possible effects of electrostatics and conformational flexibility on peptide recognition.
doi:10.1016/j.str.2011.09.014
PMCID: PMC3240807  PMID: 22153506
8.  Structural basis for mu-opioid receptor binding and activation 
Structure (London, England : 1993)  2011;19(11):1683-1690.
Summary
Opioids that stimulate the μ-opioid receptor (MOR1) are the most frequently prescribed and effective analgesics. Here we present a structural model of MOR1. Molecular dynamics simulations show a ligand-dependent increase in the conformational flexibility of the third intracellular loop that couples with the G-protein complex. These simulations likewise identified residues that form frequent contacts with ligands. We validated the binding residues using site-directed mutagenesis coupled with radioligand binding and functional assays. The model was used to blindly screen a library of ~1.2 million compounds. From the thirty-four compounds predicted to be strong binders, the top three candidates were examined using biochemical assays. One compound showed high efficacy and potency. Post hoc testing revealed this compound to be nalmefene, a potent clinically used antagonist, thus further validating the model. In summary, the MOR1 model provides a tool for elucidating the structural mechanism of ligand-initiated cell signaling and screening for novel analgesics.
doi:10.1016/j.str.2011.08.003
PMCID: PMC3217204  PMID: 22078567
9.  Combined application of cheminformatics- and physical force field-based scoring functions improves binding affinity prediction for CSAR datasets 
The curated CSAR-NRC benchmark sets provide valuable opportunity for testing or comparing the performance of both existing and novel scoring functions. We apply two different scoring functions, both independently and in combination, to predict binding affinity of ligands in the CSAR-NRC datasets. One, reported here for the first time, employs multiple chemical-geometrical descriptors of the protein-ligand interface to develop Quantitative Structure – Binding Affinity Relationships (QSBAR) models; these models are then used to predict binding affinity of ligands in the external dataset. Second is a physical force field-based scoring function, MedusaScore. We show that both individual scoring functions achieve statistically significant prediction accuracies with the squared correlation coefficient (R2) between actual and predicted binding affinity of 0.44/0.53 (Set1/Set2) with QSBAR models and 0.34/0.47 (Set1/Set2) with MedusaScore. Importantly, we find that the combination of QSBAR models and MedusaScore into consensus scoring function affords higher prediction accuracy than any of the contributing methods achieving R2 of 0.45/0.58 (Set1/Set2). Furthermore, we identify several chemical features and non-covalent interactions that may be responsible for the inaccurate prediction of binding affinity for several ligands by the scoring functions employed in this study.
doi:10.1021/ci200146e
PMCID: PMC3183266  PMID: 21780807
10.  Structural and thermodynamic effects of post-translational modifications in mutant and wild type Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase 
Journal of molecular biology  2011;408(3):555-567.
Aggregation of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is implicated in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Glutathionylation and phosphorylation of SOD1 is omnipresent in the human body, even in healthy individuals, and has been shown to increase SOD1 dimer dissociation, which is the first step on the pathway toward SOD1 aggregation. We find that post-translational modification of SOD1, especially glutathionylation, promotes dimer dissociation. We discover an intermediate state in the pathway to dissociation, a conformational change that involves a “loosening” of the β-barrels and a loss or shift of dimer interface interactions. In modified SOD1, this intermediate state is stabilized as compared to unmodified SOD1. The presence of post-translational modifications could explain the environmental factors involved in the speed of disease progression. Because post-translational modifications such as glutathionylation are often induced by oxidative stress, post-translational modification of SOD1 could be a factor in the occurrence of sporadic cases of ALS, which make up 90% of all cases of the disease.
doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2011.03.004
PMCID: PMC3082150  PMID: 21396374
11.  Regioselectivity of Catechol O-Methyltransferase Confers Enhancement of Catalytic Activity 
Chemical physics letters  2011;506(4-6):135-138.
Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catechol moieties by methylating a single hydroxyl group at the meta- or para- hydroxyl position. Hydrophobic amino acids near the active site of COMT influence the regioselectivity of this reaction. Our sequence analysis highlights their importance by showing that these residues are highly conserved throughout evolution. Reaction barriers calculated in the gas phase reveal a lower barrier during methylation at the meta- position, suggesting that the observed meta-regioselectivity of COMT can be attributed to the substrate itself, and that COMT has evolved residues to orient the substrate in a manner that increases the rate of catalysis.
doi:10.1016/j.cplett.2011.03.048
PMCID: PMC3125089  PMID: 21731105
12.  Automated Minimization of Steric Clashes in Protein Structures 
Proteins  2011;79(1):261-270.
Molecular modeling of proteins including homology modeling, structure determination, and knowledge-based protein design requires tools to evaluate and refine three-dimensional protein structures. Steric clash is one of the artifacts prevalent in low-resolution structures and homology models. Steric clashes arise due to the unnatural overlap of any two non-bonding atoms in a protein structure. Usually, removal of severe steric clashes in some structures is challenging since many existing refinement programs do not accept structures with severe steric clashes. Here, we present a quantitative approach of identifying steric clashes in proteins by defining clashes based on the Van der Waals repulsion energy of the clashing atoms. We also define a metric for quantitative estimation of the severity of clashes in proteins by performing statistical analysis of clashes in high-resolution protein structures. We describe a rapid, automated and robust protocol, Chiron, which efficiently resolves severe clashes in low-resolution structures and homology models with minimal perturbation in the protein backbone. Benchmark studies highlight the efficiency and robustness of Chiron compared to other widely used methods. We provide Chiron as an automated web server to evaluate and resolve clashes in protein structures that can be further used for more accurate protein design.
doi:10.1002/prot.22879
PMCID: PMC3058769  PMID: 21058396
Homology modeling; refinement; Chiron; Discrete Molecular Dynamics; Protein Design
13.  Rapid flexible docking using a stochastic rotamer library of ligands 
Existing flexible docking approaches model the ligand and receptor flexibility either separately or in a loosely-coupled manner, which captures the conformational changes inefficiently. Here, we propose a flexible docking approach, MedusaDock, which models both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously with sets of discrete rotamers. We develop an algorithm to build the ligand rotamer library “on-the-fly” during docking simulations. MedusaDock benchmarks demonstrate a rapid sampling efficiency and high prediction accuracy in both self-docking (to the co-crystallized state) and cross-docking (to a state co-crystallized with a different ligand), the latter of which mimics the virtual-screening procedure in computational drug discovery. We also perform a virtual-screening test of four flexible kinase targets including cyclin-dependent kinase 2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, HIV reverse transcriptase, and HIV protease. We find significant improvements of virtual-screening enrichments when compared to rigid-receptor methods. The predictive power of MedusaDock in cross-docking and preliminary virtual-screening benchmarks highlights the importance to model both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously in computational docking.
doi:10.1021/ci100218t
PMCID: PMC2947618  PMID: 20712341
14.  Disruptive mRNA folding increases translational efficiency of catechol-O-methyltransferase variant 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;39(14):6201-6212.
Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a major enzyme controlling catecholamine levels that plays a central role in cognition, affective mood and pain perception. There are three common COMT haplotypes in the human population reported to have functional effects, divergent in two synonymous and one nonsynonymous position. We demonstrate that one of the haplotypes, carrying the non-synonymous variation known to code for a less stable protein, exhibits increased protein expression in vitro. This increased protein expression, which would compensate for lower protein stability, is solely produced by a synonymous variation (C166T) situated within the haplotype and located in the 5′ region of the RNA transcript. Based on mRNA secondary structure predictions, we suggest that structural destabilization near the start codon caused by the T allele could be related to the observed increase in COMT expression. Our folding simulations of the tertiary mRNA structures demonstrate that destabilization by the T allele lowers the folding transition barrier, thus decreasing the probability of occupying its native state. These data suggest a novel structural mechanism whereby functional synonymous variations near the translation initiation codon affect the translation efficiency via entropy-driven changes in mRNA dynamics and present another example of stable compensatory genetic variations in the human population.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr165
PMCID: PMC3152328  PMID: 21486747
15.  N-terminal strands of filamin Ig domains act as a conformational switch under biological forces 
Proteins  2010;78(1):12-24.
Conformational changes of filamin A under stress have been postulated to play crucial roles in signaling pathways of cell responses. Direct observation of conformational changes under stress is beyond the resolution of current experimental techniques. On the other hand, computational studies are mainly limited to either traditional molecular dynamics simulations of short durations and high forces or simulations of simplified models. Here we perform all-atom discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations to study thermally and force-induced unfolding of filamin A. The high conformational sampling efficiency of DMD allows us to observe force-induced unfolding of filamin A Ig domains under physiological forces. The computationally identified critical unfolding forces agree well with experimental measurements. Despite a large heterogeneity in the population of force-induced intermediate states, we find a common initial unfolding intermediate in all the Ig domains of filamin, where the N-terminal strand unfolds. We also study the thermal unfolding of several filamin Ig-like domains. We find that thermally induced unfolding features an early-stage intermediate state similar to the one observed in force-induced unfolding and characterized by N-terminal strand being unfurled. We propose that the N-terminal strand may act as a conformational switch that unfolds under physiological forces leading to exposure of cryptic binding sites, removal of native binding sites, and modulating the quaternary structure of domains.
doi:10.1002/prot.22479
PMCID: PMC2804786  PMID: 19514078
16.  Structural basis for the sequence-dependent effects of platinum–DNA adducts 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;37(8):2434-2448.
The differences in efficacy and molecular mechanisms of platinum based anti-cancer drugs cisplatin (CP) and oxaliplatin (OX) have been hypothesized to be in part due to the differential binding affinity of cellular and damage recognition proteins to CP and OX adducts formed on adjacent guanines in genomic DNA. HMGB1a in particular exhibits higher binding affinity to CP-GG adducts, and the extent of discrimination between CP- and OX-GG adducts is dependent on the bases flanking the adducts. However, the structural basis for this differential binding is not known. Here, we show that the conformational dynamics of CP- and OX-GG adducts are distinct and depend on the sequence context of the adduct. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Pt-GG adducts in the TGGA sequence context revealed that even though the major conformations of CP- and OX-GG adducts were similar, the minor conformations were distinct. Using the pattern of hydrogen bond formation between the Pt–ammines and the adjacent DNA bases, we identified the major and minor conformations sampled by Pt–DNA. We found that the minor conformations sampled exclusively by the CP-GG adduct exhibit structural properties that favor binding by HMGB1a, which may explain its higher binding affinity to CP-GG adducts, while these conformations are not sampled by OX-GG adducts because of the constraints imposed by its cyclohexane ring, which may explain the negligible binding affinity of HMGB1a for OX-GG adducts in the TGGA sequence context. Based on these results, we postulate that the constraints imposed by the cyclohexane ring of OX affect the DNA conformations explored by OX-GG adduct compared to those of CP-GG adduct, which may influence the binding affinities of HMG-domain proteins for Pt-GG adducts, and that these conformations are further influenced by the DNA sequence context of the Pt-GG adduct.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp029
PMCID: PMC2677858  PMID: 19255091
17.  Protein Folding: Then and Now 
Over the past three decades the protein folding field has undergone monumental changes. Originally a purely academic question, how a protein folds has now become vital in understanding diseases and our abilities to rationally manipulate cellular life by engineering protein folding pathways. We review and contrast past and recent developments in the protein folding field. Specifically, we discuss the progress in our understanding of protein folding thermodynamics and kinetics, the properties of evasive intermediates, and unfolded states. We also discuss how some abnormalities in protein folding lead to protein aggregation and human diseases.
doi:10.1016/j.abb.2007.05.014
PMCID: PMC2173875  PMID: 17585870
18.  Probing protein aggregation using simplified models and discrete molecular dynamics 
Understanding the role of biomolecular dynamics in cellular processes leading to human diseases and the ability to rationally manipulate these processes is of fundamental importance in scientific research. The last decade has witnessed significant progress in probing biophysical behavior of proteins. However, we are still limited in understanding how changes in protein dynamics and inter-protein interactions occurring in short length- and time-scales lead to aberrations in their biological function. Bridging this gap in biology probed using computer simulations marks a challenging frontier in computational biology. Here we examine hypothesis-driven simplified protein models in conjunction with discrete molecular dynamics in the study of protein aggregation, implicated in series of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Discrete molecular dynamics simulations of simplified protein models have emerged as a powerful methodology with its ability to bridge the gap in time and length scales from protein dynamics to aggregation, and provide an indispensable tool for probing protein aggregation.
PMCID: PMC2497428  PMID: 18508545
Protein Aggregation; Protein Misfolding; Simplified Modeling; Aggregation Kinetics; Folding Thermodynamics; Discrete Molecular Dynamics; Molecular Dynamics; Computational Biology; Biophysics; MD; DMD; Misfolding; Molecular Dynamics; Review
19.  Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase without Zn is Folded but Catalytically Inactive 
Journal of molecular biology  2014;426(24):4112-4124.
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis has been linked to the gain of aberrant function of superoxide dismutase, Cu,Zn-SOD1 upon protein misfolding. The mechanism of SOD1 misfolding is thought to involve mutations leading to the loss of Zn, followed by protein unfolding, and aggregation. We show that the removal of Zn from SOD1 may not lead to an immediate unfolding, but immediately deactivates the enzyme through a combination of subtle structural and electronic effects. Using Quantum Mechanics/Discrete Molecular Dynamics, we showed that Zn-less wild type SOD1 and its D124N mutant that does not bind Zn both have at least metastable folded states. In those states, the reduction potential of Cu increases, leading to the presence of detectable amounts of Cu(I) instead of Cu(II) in the active site, as confirmed experimentally. The Cu(I) protein cannot participate in the catalytic Cu(I) – Cu(II) cycle. However, even without the full reduction to Cu(I), the Cu site in the Zn-less variants of SOD1 is shown to be catalytically incompetent: unable to bind superoxide in a way comparable to the wild type SOD1. The changes are more radical and different in the D124N Zn-less mutant than in the Zn-less wild type SOD1, suggesting D124N being perhaps not the most adequate model for Zn-less SOD1. Overall, Zn in SOD1 appears to be influencing the Cu site directly by adjusting its reduction potential and geometry. Thus, the role of Zn in SOD1 is not just structural, as was previously thought; it is a vital part of the catalytic machinery.
doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2014.07.016
PMCID: PMC4258539  PMID: 25083917
20.  Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(11):e0142826.
The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0142826
PMCID: PMC4640872  PMID: 26554831
21.  New Models of Tetrahymena Telomerase RNA from Experimentally Derived Constraints and Modeling 
Journal of the American Chemical Society  2012;134(49):20070-20080.
The telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex ensures complete replication of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomerase RNA, TER, provides the template for replicating the G-rich strand of telomeric DNA, provides an anchor site for telomerase-associated proteins, and participates in catalysis through several incompletely characterized mechanisms. A major impediment towards understanding its non-templating roles is the absence of high content structural information for TER within the telomerase complex. Here, we used selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) to examine the structure of Tetrahymena TER free in solution and bound to tTERT in the minimal telomerase RNP. We discovered a striking difference in the two conformations and established direct evidence for base pair triples in the tTER pseudoknot. We then used SHAPE data, previously published FRET data, and biochemical inference to model the structure of tTER using discrete molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting tTER structure was docked with a homology model of tTERT to characterize the conformational changes of tTER that attend binding to tTERT. Free in solution, tTER appears to contain four pairing regions: stems I, II, and IV, which are present in the commonly accepted structure, and stem III, a large paired region that encompasses the template and pseudoknot domains. Our interpretation of the data and subsequent modeling affords a molecular model for telomerase assemblage in which a large stem III of tTER unwinds to allow proper association of the template with the tTERT active site and formation of the pseudoknot. Additionally, analysis of our SHAPE data and previous enzymatic footpinting allows us to propose a model for stem-loop IV function in which tTERT is activated by binding stem IV in the major grove of the helix-capping loop.
doi:10.1021/ja305636u
PMCID: PMC4427051  PMID: 23163801
Telomerase; ribonucleoprotein complex; RNA footprinting; pseudoknot
22.  Identification of a new actin binding surface on vinculin that mediates mechanical cell and focal adhesion properties 
SUMMARY
Vinculin, a cytoskeletal scaffold protein essential for embryogenesis and cardiovascular function, localizes to focal adhesions and adherens junctions, connecting cell surface receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. While vinculin interacts with many adhesion proteins, its interaction with filamentous actin regulates cell morphology, motility, and mechanotransduction. Disruption of this interaction lowers cell traction forces and enhances actin flow rates. Although a model for the vinculin:actin complex exists, we recently identified actin-binding deficient mutants of vinculin outside sites predicted to bind actin, and developed an alternative model to better define this novel actin-binding surface, using negative-stain EM, discrete molecular dynamics, and mutagenesis. Actin-binding deficient vinculin variants expressed in vinculin knockout fibroblasts fail to rescue cell-spreading defects and reduce cellular response to external force. These findings highlight the importance of this new actin-binding surface and provide the molecular basis for elucidating additional roles of this interaction, including actin-induced conformational changes which promote actin bundling.
doi:10.1016/j.str.2014.03.002
PMCID: PMC4039106  PMID: 24685146
23.  Non-native Soluble Oligomers of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Contain a Conformational Epitope Linked to Cytotoxicity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 
Biochemistry  2014;53(14):2423-2432.
Soluble misfolded Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is implicated in motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, the relative toxicities of the various non-native species formed by SOD1 as it misfolds and aggregates are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that early stages of SOD1 aggregation involve the formation of soluble oligomers that contain an epitope specific to disease-relevant misfolded SOD1; this epitope, recognized by the C4F6 antibody, has been proposed as a marker of toxic species. Formation of potentially toxic oligomers is likely to be exacerbated by an oxidizing cellular environment, as evidenced by increased oligomerization propensity and C4F6 reactivity when oxidative modification by glutathione is present at Cys-111. These findings suggest that soluble non-native SOD1 oligomers, rather than native-like dimers or monomers, share structural similarity to pathogenic misfolded species found in ALS patients and therefore represent potential cytotoxic agents and therapeutic targets in ALS.
doi:10.1021/bi500158w
PMCID: PMC4004233  PMID: 24660965
24.  Regulatory insertion removal restores maturation, stability and function of ΔF508 CFTR 
Journal of molecular biology  2010;401(2):194-210.
The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) epithelial anion channel is a large multi-domain membrane protein which matures inefficiently during biosynthesis. Its assembly is further perturbed by the deletion of F508 from the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) responsible for most cystic fibrosis. The mutant polypeptide is recognized by cellular quality control systems and is proteolyzed. CFTR NBD1 contains a 32 residue segment termed the regulatory insertion (RI) not present in other ABC transporters. We report here that RI deletion enabled ΔF508 CFTR to mature and traffic to the cell surface where it mediated regulated anion efflux and exhibited robust single chloride channel activity. Long term pulse-chase experiments showed that the mature ΔRI/ΔF508 had a T1/2 of ~14h in cells, similar to the wild-type. RI deletion restored ATP occlusion by NBD1 of ΔF508 CFTR and had a strong thermo-stabilizing influence on the channel with gating up to at least 40°C. None of these effects of RI removal were achieved by deletion of only portions of RI. Discrete molecular dynamics simulations of NBD1 indicated that RI might indirectly influence the interaction of NBD1 with the rest of the protein by attenuating the coupling of the F508 containing loop with the F1-like ATP-binding core subdomain so that RI removal overcame the perturbations caused by F508 deletion. Restriction of RI to a particular conformational state may ameliorate the impact of the disease-causing mutation.
doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2010.06.019
PMCID: PMC4361937  PMID: 20561529
ABC transporters; CFTR; cystic fibrosis; ion channel; DMD simulations
25.  Dynamics Intrinsic to Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function and Stability 
The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) requires dynamic fluctuations between states in its gating cycle for proper channel function, including changes in the interactions between the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and between the intracellular domain (ICD) coupling helices and NBDs. Such motions are also linked with fluctuating phosphorylation-dependent binding of CFTR’s disordered regulatory (R) region to the NBDs and partners. Folding of CFTR is highly inefficient, with the marginally stable NBD1 sampling excited states or folding intermediates that are aggregation-prone. The severe CF–causing F508del mutation exacerbates the folding inefficiency of CFTR and leads to impaired channel regulation and function, partly as a result of perturbed NBD1–ICD interactions and enhanced sampling of these NBD1 excited states. Increased knowledge of the dynamics within CFTR will expand our understanding of the regulated channel gating of the protein as well as of the F508del defects in folding and function.
Improved knowledge of the dynamics within CFTR—including the R region and NBD1—will expand our understanding of its function, as well as the implications of the F508del defect that is present in many cystic fibrosis patients.
doi:10.1101/cshperspect.a009522
PMCID: PMC3579207  PMID: 23457292

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