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1.  Discovery and Characterization of Novel Mutant FLT3 Kinase Inhibitors 
Molecular cancer therapeutics  2010;9(9):2468-2477.
For a subpopulation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, the constitutively activated tyrosine kinase, mutant FLT3, has emerged as a promising target for therapy. The development of drug resistance, however, is a growing concern for mutant FLT3 inhibitors, such as PKC412. Potential therapeutic benefit can arise from the combination of two structurally diverse inhibitors that target- but bind differently to- the same protein or from two inhibitors with completely different mechanisms of action. Thus, there is a need for identification and development of novel FLT3 inhibitors that have the ability to positively combine with PKC412 or standard chemotherapeutic agents used to treat AML as a way to suppress the development of drug resistance and consequently prolong disease remission. Here, we report the effects of the novel type II ATP competitive inhibitors, HG-7-85-01 and HG-7-86-01, which potently and selectively target mutant FLT3 protein kinase activity, and inhibit the proliferation of cells harboring FLT3-ITD or FLT3 kinase domain point mutants via induction of apoptosis and cell cycle inhibition. Anti-leukemic activity of HG-7-85-01 was demonstrated in vivo to be comparable to that observed with PKC412 in a bioluminescence assay utilizing NCr nude mice harboring Ba/F3-FLT3-ITD-luc+ cells. HG-7-85-01 was also observed to override PKC412 resistance. Finally, HG-7-85-01 and HG-7-86-01 synergized with PKC412 and standard chemotherapeutic agents against mutant PKC412-sensitive and some PKC412-resistant, FLT3-positive cells. Thus, we present a structurally novel class of FLT3 inhibitors that warrants consideration for clinical testing against drug-resistant disease in AML patients.
doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-10-0232
PMCID: PMC3967795  PMID: 20807780
2.  Development of ATP-competitive mTOR Inhibitors 
The mTOR mediated signaling transduction pathway has been observed to be deregulated in a wide variety of cancer and metabolic diseases. Despite extensive clinical development efforts, the well-known allosteric mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and structurally related rapalogs have failed to show significant single-agent anti-tumor efficacy in most types of cancer. This limited clinical success maybe due to the inability of the rapalogs to maintain a complete blockade mTOR mediated signaling. Therefore numerous efforts have been initiated to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that would block both mTORC1 and mTORC2 complex activity. Here we describe our experimental approaches to develop Torin1 using a medium throughput cell-based screening assay and structure-guided drug design.
doi:10.1007/978-1-61779-430-8_29
PMCID: PMC3964610  PMID: 22125084
mTOR; mTORC1; mTORC2; PI3K; PIKK; Akt; Rapamycin; Torin1
3.  Discovery of 1-(4-(4-propionylpiperazin-1-yl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-9-(quinolin-3-yl)benzo[h][1,6]naphthyridin-2(1H)-one as a highly potent, selective Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor for the treatment of cancer 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2010;53(19):7146-7155.
The mTOR protein is a master regulator of cell growth and proliferation, and inhibitors of its kinase activity have the potential to become new class of anti-cancer drugs. Starting from quinoline 1, which was identified in a biochemical mTOR assay, we developed a tricyclic benzonaphthyridinone inhibitor Torin1(26), which inhibited phosphorylation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 substrates in cells at concentrations of 2 nM and 10 nM, respectively. Moreover, Torin1 exhibits 1000-fold selectivity for mTOR over PI3K (EC50 = 1800 nM) and exhibits 100-fold binding selectivity relative to 450 other protein kinases. Torin1 was efficacious at a dose of 20 mg/kg in a U87MG xenograft model, and demonstrated good pharmacodynamic inhibition of downstream effectors of mTOR in tumor and peripheral tissues. These results demonstrate that Torin1 is a useful probe of mTOR-dependent phenomena and that benzonaphthridinones represent a promising scaffold for the further development of mTOR-specific inhibitors with the potential for clinical utility.
doi:10.1021/jm101144f
PMCID: PMC3893826  PMID: 20860370
5.  The Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e78151.
Background
Observational studies suggest an association between the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the relationship between RA and MetS is controversial and research in this area is currently lacking.
Objective
The aim of this study was to assess whether the prevalence of MetS was higher in a group of RA patients compared to subjects without RA.
Design
A PubMed database search was conducted during April 2013 to identify observational studies of RA and risk of MetS. Reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed. Two authors independently extracted information on the study design, the characteristics of the study participants, exposure and outcome assessments, and the method used to control for potential confounding factors. A random-effects model was used for the risk estimates.
Results
Our meta-analysis of four cross-sectional controlled studies plus eight case-control studies involving a total of 2283 cases and 4403 controls identified a significant association between RA and risk of MetS, with an overall OR of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.03-1.50).
Conclusion
This meta-analysis provides further evidence supporting patients with RA have a higher prevalence of MetS than subjects without RA. In addition, the geographic region of the population and the criteria used for MetS diagnosis could influence the association. However, these observations would need to be evaluated using prospective, randomized studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078151
PMCID: PMC3808281  PMID: 24205134
6.  Development of ‘DFG-out’ inhibitors of gatekeeper mutant kinases 
HG-7-85-01(22) and HG-7-86-01(26) are thiazolo[5,4-b]pyridine containing type II tyrosine kinase inhibitors with potent cellular activity against both wild-type and ‘gatekeeper’ mutant T315I- Bcr-Abl. Here we report on the ‘hybrid design’ concept and subsequent structure activity guided optimization efforts that resulted in the development of these inhibitors.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.06.036
PMCID: PMC3415686  PMID: 22819762
T315I Bcr-Abl; Kinase inhibitor; Gatekeeper mutant; Type II inhibitor; Thiazolo[5; 4-b]pyridine
7.  Prevalence of HIV and Syphilis Infection among High School and College Student MSM in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e69137.
Objectives
The aim of this study is to systematically review the published studies and summarize the estimates of HIV and syphilis prevalences among high school and college student MSM in China in order to provide information for conducting targeted interventions.
Methods
Pubmed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang and Google Scholar databases were searched in January 2013 to identify relevant articles. Data of eligible citations were extracted by two reviewers. All analyses were performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis V2.0 and SPSS V17.0.
Results
Twenty-four eligible studies (6 in English and 18 in Chinese), published between 2006 and 2012, with a total of 3083 student MSM participants, were included. The meta-analyses showed that the prevalences of HIV and syphilis among studied student MSM were 4.4% (95% CI: 3.0%, 6.4%) and 5.7% (95% CI: 4.8%, 6.7%), respectively. HIV prevalence increased over the study period (3.0% in 2003–2006; 4.5% in 2007–2008, and 6.8% in 2009–2010, trend test chi-square = 11.3, p = 0.001).
Conclusions
Student MSM have become high-risk populations for HIV infection in China. The high prevalence of syphilis and the increasing HIV prevalence trend indicate the potential for a more severe HIV epidemic. Comprehensive intervention strategies that address condom promotion, syphilis detection and treatment, and health education need to be tailored to this vulnerable population to prevent HIV and syphilis infections.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069137
PMCID: PMC3712943  PMID: 23874891
8.  An Amino-indazole Scaffold with Spectrum Selective Kinase Inhibition of FLT3, PDGFRα and Kit 
Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a number of 3-amino-1H-indazol-6-yl-benzamides that were designed to target the “DFG-out” conformation of the kinase activation loop. Several compounds such as 4 and 11 exhibit single-digit nanomolar EC50s against FLT3, c-Kit and the gatekeeper T674M mutant of PDGFRα.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.05.107
PMCID: PMC3547541  PMID: 22727638
9.  A Complex Network of Factors with Overlapping Affinities Repress Splicing through Intronic Elements 
To better understand splicing regulation, we used a cell-based screen to identify ten diverse motifs that inhibit splicing from intron. Each motif was validated in another human cell type and gene context, and their presence correlated with in vivo splicing changes. All motifs exhibited exonic splicing enhancer or silencer activity, and grouping these motifs based on their distributions yielded clusters with distinct patterns of context-dependent activity. Candidate regulatory factors associated with each motif were identified, recovering 24 known and novel splicing regulators. Specific domains in selected factors were sufficient to confer ISS activity. Many factors bound multiple distinct motifs with similar affinity, and all motifs were recognized by multiple factors, revealing a complex, overlapping network of protein:RNA interactions. This arrangement enables individual cis-element to function differently in distinct cellular contexts depending on the spectrum of regulatory factors present.
doi:10.1038/nsmb.2459
PMCID: PMC3537874  PMID: 23241926
splicing regulation; splicing factors; intronic splicing silencers; RNA binding protein; context dependent activity
10.  Small Molecule Inhibitors of the c-Fes Protein-tyrosine Kinase 
Chemistry & biology  2012;19(4):529-540.
SUMMARY
The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here we report the identification of Type I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a novel role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.
doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2012.01.020
PMCID: PMC3334838  PMID: 22520759
11.  A Dibutyl Phthalate Sensor Based on a Nanofiber Polyaniline Coated Quartz Crystal Monitor 
Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)  2013;13(3):3765-3775.
Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is a commonly used plasticizer and additive to adhesives, printing inks and nail polishes. Because it has been found to be a powerful reproductive and developmental toxicant, a sensor to monitor DBP in some working spaces and the environment is required. In this work polyaniline nanofibers were deposited on the electrode of a quartz crystal oscillator to form a Quartz Crystal Microbalance gas sensor. The coated quartz crystal and a non-coated quartz crystal were mounted in a sealed chamber, and their frequency difference was monitored. When DBP vapor was injected into the chamber, gas adsorption decreased the frequency of the coated quartz crystal oscillator and thereby caused an increase in the frequency difference between the two crystals. The change of the frequency difference was recorded as the sensor response. The sensor was extremely sensitive to DBP and could be easily recovered by N2 purging. A low measurement limit of 20 ppb was achieved. The morphologies of the polyaniline films prepared by different approaches have been studied by SEM and BET. How the nanofiber-structure can improve the sensitivity and stability is discussed, while its selectivity and long-term stability were investigated.
doi:10.3390/s130303765
PMCID: PMC3658774  PMID: 23507822
QCM; gas sensor; dibutyl phthalate; nanofiber; polyaniline; PACS 07.07.Df (Gas sensor); 77.65.Fs (Quartz resonator); 82.35.Np (Polymers nanoparticles in); 81.07.-b (Nanoscale materials fabrication and characterization)
12.  Selective Akt Inhibitors Synergize with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Effectively Override Stroma-Associated Cytoprotection of Mutant FLT3-Positive AML Cells 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e56473.
Objectives
Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients commonly show rapid and significant peripheral blood blast cell reduction, however a marginal decrease in bone marrow blasts. This suggests a protective environment and highlights the demand for a better understanding of stromal:leukemia cell communication. As a strategy to improve clinical efficacy, we searched for novel agents capable of potentiating the stroma-diminished effects of TKI treatment of mutant FLT3-expressing cells.
Methods
We designed a combinatorial high throughput drug screen using well-characterized kinase inhibitor-focused libraries to identify novel kinase inhibitors capable of overriding stromal-mediated resistance to TKIs, such as PKC412 and AC220. Standard liquid culture proliferation assays, cell cycle and apoptosis analysis, and immunoblotting were carried out with cell lines or primary AML to validate putative candidates from the screen and characterize the mechanism(s) underlying observed synergy.
Results and Conclusions
Our study led to the observation of synergy between selective Akt inhibitors and FLT3 inhibitors against mutant FLT3-positive AML in either the absence or presence of stroma. Our findings are consistent with evidence that Akt activation is characteristic of mutant FLT3-transformed cells, as well as observed residual Akt activity following FLT3 inhibitor treatment. In conclusion, our study highlights the potential importance of Akt as a signaling factor in leukemia survival, and supports the use of the co-culture chemical screen to identify agents able to potentiate TKI anti-leukemia activity in a cytoprotective microenvironment.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056473
PMCID: PMC3578845  PMID: 23437141
13.  Discovery of potent and selective covalent inhibitors of JNK 
Chemistry & biology  2012;19(1):140-154.
The mitogen activated kinases JNK1/2/3 are key enzymes in signaling modules that transduce and integrate extracellular stimuli into coordinated cellular response. Here we report the discovery of the first irreversible inhibitors of JNK1/2/3. We describe two JNK3 co-crystal structures at 2.60 and 2.97 Å resolutions that show the compounds form covalent bonds with a conserved cysteine residue. JNK-IN-8 is a selective JNK inhibitor that inhibits phosphorylation of c-Jun, a direct substrate of JNK kinase, in cells exposed to sub-micromolar drug in a manner that depends on covalent modification of the conserved cysteine residue. Extensive biochemical, cellular and pathway-based profiling establish the selectivity of JNK-IN-8 for JNK and suggest that the compound will be broadly useful as a pharmacological probe of JNK-dependent signal transduction. Potential lead compounds have also been identified for kinases including IRAK1, PIK3C3, PIP4K2C, and PIP5K3.
doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2011.11.010
PMCID: PMC3270411  PMID: 22284361
14.  A Putative Gene sbe3-rs for Resistant Starch Mutated from SBE3 for Starch Branching Enzyme in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e43026.
Foods high in resistant starch (RS) are beneficial to prevent various diseases including diabetes, colon cancers, diarrhea and chronic renal or hepatic diseases. Elevated RS in rice is important for public health since rice is a staple food for half of the world population. A japonica mutant ‘Jiangtangdao 1’ (RS = 11.67%) was crossed with an indica cultivar ‘Miyang 23’ (RS = 0.41%). The mutant sbe3-rs that explained 60.4% of RS variation was mapped between RM6611 and RM13366 on chromosome 2 (LOD = 36) using 178 F2 plants genotyped with 106 genome-wide polymorphic SSR markers. Using 656 plants from four F3∶4 families, sbe3-rs was fine mapped to a 573.3 Kb region between InDel 2 and InDel 6 using one STS, five SSRs and seven InDel markers. SBE3 which codes for starch branching enzyme was identified as a candidate gene within the putative region. Nine pairs of primers covering 22 exons were designed to sequence genomic DNA of the wild type for SBE3 and the mutant for sbe3-rs comparatively. Sequence analysis identified a missense mutation site where Leu-599 of the wild was changed to Pro-599 of the mutant in the SBE3 coding region. Because the point mutation resulted in the loss of a restriction enzyme site, sbe3-rs was not digested by a CAPS marker for SpeI site while SBE3 was. Co-segregation of the digestion pattern with RS content among 178 F2 plants further supported sbe3-rs responsible for RS in rice. As a result, the CAPS marker could be used in marker-assisted breeding to develop rice cultivars with elevated RS which is otherwise difficult to accurately assess in crops. Transgenic technology should be employed for a definitive conclusion of the sbe3-rs.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043026
PMCID: PMC3427327  PMID: 22937009
15.  Mapping mechanical properties of organic thin films by force-modulation microscopy in aqueous media 
Summary
The mechanical properties of organic and biomolecular thin films on surfaces play an important role in a broad range of applications. Although force-modulation microscopy (FMM) is used to map the apparent elastic properties of such films with high lateral resolution in air, it has rarely been applied in aqueous media. In this letter we describe the use of FMM to map the apparent elastic properties of self-assembled monolayers and end-tethered protein thin films in aqueous media. Furthermore, we describe a simple analysis of the contact mechanics that enables the selection of FMM imaging parameters and thus yields a reliable interpretation of the FMM image contrast.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.3.53
PMCID: PMC3458590  PMID: 23019540
acoustic atomic force microscopy; biomolecules; elastic modulus mapping; nanomechanical characterization; self-assembled monolayers
16.  In Situ Kinase Profiling Reveals Functionally Relevant Properties of Native Kinases 
Chemistry & biology  2011;18(6):699-710.
Summary
Protein kinases are intensely studied mediators of cellular signaling, yet important questions remain regarding their regulation and in vivo properties. Here we use a probe-based chemoprotemics platform to profile several well studied kinase inhibitors against more than 200 kinases in native cell proteomes and reveal new biological targets for some of these inhibitors. Several striking differences were identified between native and recombinant kinase inhibitory profiles, in particular, for the Raf kinases. The native kinase binding profiles presented here closely mirror the cellular activity of these inhibitors, even when the inhibition profiles differ dramatically from recombinant assay results. Additionally, Raf activation events could be detected upon live cell treatment with inhibitors. These studies highlight the complexities of protein kinase behavior in the cellular context and demonstrate that profiling with only recombinant/purified enzymes can be misleading.
doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2011.04.011
PMCID: PMC3142620  PMID: 21700206
17.  Mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene identify a novel therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer 
Cancer discovery  2011;1(1):78-89.
While genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations which drive squamous cell lung cancer. Sanger sequencing of the tyrosine kinome identified mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene in 3.8% of squamous cell lung cancers and cell lines. Squamous lung cancer cell lines harboring DDR2 mutations were selectively killed by knock-down of DDR2 by RNAi or by treatment with the multi-targeted kinase inhibitor dasatinib. Tumors established from a DDR2 mutant cell line were sensitive to dasatinib in xenograft models. Expression of mutated DDR2 led to cellular transformation which was blocked by dasatinib. A squamous cell lung cancer patient with a response to dasatinib and erlotinib treatment harbored a DDR2 kinase domain mutation. These data suggest that gain-of-function mutations in DDR2 are important oncogenic events and are amenable to therapy with dasatinib. As dasatinib is already approved for use, these findings could be rapidly translated into clinical trials.
doi:10.1158/2159-8274.CD-11-0005
PMCID: PMC3274752  PMID: 22328973
Squamous cell lung cancer; DDR2; dasatinib; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; lung cancer genomics
18.  Broad Spectrum Alkynyl Inhibitors of T315I Bcr-Abl 
A series of alkyne containing type II inhibitors with potent inhibitory activity of T315I Bcr-Abl has been identified. The most active compound 4 exhibits an EC50 of less than 1 nM against wild-type Bcr-Abl and an EC50 of 10 nM against T315I mutant but is broadly active against a number of other kinases.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.05.043
PMCID: PMC2901992  PMID: 20541934
19.  A Structure-guided Approach to Creating Covalent FGFR Inhibitors 
Chemistry & biology  2010;17(3):285-295.
Summary
The fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (FGFR1, 2, 3, and 4) represent promising therapeutic targets in a number of cancers. We have developed the first potent and selective irreversible inhibitor of FGFR1, 2, 3, and 4 which we named FIIN-1 that forms a covalent bond with cysteine 486 located in the P-loop of the FGFR1 ATP-binding site. We demonstrate that the inhibitor potently inhibits Tel-FGFR1 transformed Ba/F3 cells (EC50 = 14 nM) as well as numerous FGFR-dependent cancer cell lines. A biotin-derivatized version of the inhibitor, FIIN-1-biotin, was shown to covalently label FGFR1 at Cys486. FIIN-1 is a useful probe of FGFR-dependent cellular phenomena and may provide a starting point of the development of therapeutically relevant irreversible inhibitors of wild-type and drug-resistant forms of FGFR kinases.
doi:10.1016/j.chembiol.2010.02.007
PMCID: PMC2920453  PMID: 20338520
20.  Targeting wild-type and T315I Bcr-Abl by combining allosteric with ATP-site inhibitors 
Nature  2010;463(7280):501-506.
SUMMARY
In an effort to find new pharmacological modalities to overcome resistance to ATP-site inhibitors of Bcr-Abl, we recently reported the discovery of GNF-2, a selective allosteric Bcr-Abl inhibitor. Here, using solution NMR, X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis and hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry we demonstrate that GNF-2 binds to the myristate binding site of Abl, leading to changes in the structural dynamics of the ATP-binding site. GNF-5, an analog of GNF-2 having improved pharmacokinetic properties, when utilized in combination with the ATP-competitive inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib, suppressed the emergence of resistance mutations in vitro, displayed additive inhibitory activity in biochemical and cellular assays against T315I Bcr-Abl and displayed in vivo efficacy against the recalcitrant T315I Bcr-Abl mutant in a murine bone-marrow transplantation model. These results demonstrate that therapeutically relevant inhibition of Bcr-Abl activity can be achieved using inhibitors that bind to the myristate binding site and that combining allosteric and ATP-competitive inhibitors can overcome resistance to either agent alone.
doi:10.1038/nature08675
PMCID: PMC2901986  PMID: 20072125
21.  Allosteric Interactions between the Myristate- and ATP-Site of the Abl Kinase 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(1):e15929.
Abl kinase inhibitors targeting the ATP binding pocket are currently employed as potent anti-leukemogenic agents but drug resistance has become a significant clinical limitation. Recently, a compound that binds to the myristate pocket of Abl (GNF-5) was shown to act cooperatively with nilotinib, an ATP-competitive inhibitor to target the recalcitrant “T315I” gatekeeper mutant of Bcr-Abl. To uncover an explanation for how drug binding at a distance from the kinase active site could lead to inhibition and how inhibitors could combine their effects, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) was employed to monitor conformational effects in the presence of both dasatinib, a clinically approved ATP-site inhibitor, and GNF-5. While dasatinib binding to wild type Abl clearly influenced Abl conformation, no binding was detected between dasatinib and T315I. GNF-5, however, elicited the same conformational changes in both wild type and T315I, including changes to dynamics within the ATP site located approximately 25 Å from the site of GNF-5 interaction. Simultaneous binding of dasatinib and GNF-5 to T315I caused conformational and/or dynamics changes in Abl such that effects of dasatinib on T315I were the same as when it bound to wild type Abl. These results provide strong biophysical evidence that allosteric interactions play a role in Abl kinase downregulation and that targeting sites outside the ATP binding site can provide an important pharmacological tool to overcome mutations that cause resistance to ATP-competitive inhibitors.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015929
PMCID: PMC3018526  PMID: 21264348
22.  Separation of Peptides with Polyionic Nanosponges for MALDI-MS Analysis 
A polymer brush consisting of 70% poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM) and 30% polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) was synthesized from gold substrates with a grafting-from AIBN type free-radical initiator. Fractionation of two peptides, Bradykinin and Buccalin, was accomplished in less than 120 seconds by placing a 30 pM (pH∼6.2) droplet onto the polymer brush substrate. The eluant containing the anionic Buccalin is pipetted away for MALDI analysis while the cationic Bradykinin adsorbed to the swollen anionic brush and was subsequently released by adding a droplet of formic acid to the substrate. This caused the brush to collapse and release the Bradykinin, much like squeezing a sponge; these nanosponge substrates exhibited very high loading capacity (>2.0 mg/ml) compared to plasma-polymer-modified MALDI substrates. Ellipsometric measurements showed that complementary peptides adsorb rapidly while those of the same charge do not and MALDI-MS analysis of the two fractions showed separation of both peptides. The adsorption of Bradykinin was monitored over time and 85% of the peptide had been adsorbed to the nanosponge in 1 minute from a 0.5 mg/ml aqueous solution.
doi:10.1021/la802723r
PMCID: PMC2716796  PMID: 19123797
23.  Clinical stage EGFR inhibitors irreversibly alkylate Bmx Kinase 
Irreversible HER/erbB inhibitors selectively inhibit HER-family kinases by targeting a unique cysteine residue located within the ATP-binding pocket. Sequence alignment reveals that this rare cysteine is also present in ten other protein kinases including all five Tec-family members. We demonstrate that the Tec-family kinase Bmx is potently inhibited by irreversible modification at Cys496 by clinical stage EGFR-inhibitors such as CI-1033. This cross-reactivity may have significant clinical implications.
doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2008.07.062
PMCID: PMC2610413  PMID: 18667312
24.  3-(10-Chloro-9-anthr­yl)-5-[3-(prop-2-yn­yloxy)phenoxy­meth­yl]isoxazole 
In the title mol­ecule, C27H18ClNO3, the anthracene mean plane forms dihedral angles of 67.43 (2) and 15.75 (3)° with the isoxazole and benzene rings, respectively. In the crystal structure, C—H⋯π inter­actions link mol­ecules into centrosymmetric dimers, which are further linked by weak inter­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds into ribbons propagating in the [110] direction.
doi:10.1107/S1600536809019229
PMCID: PMC2969672  PMID: 21583246
25.  Activating mutations in ALK provide a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma 
Nature  2008;455(7215):975-978.
Neuroblastoma, an embryonal tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths due to childhood cancer1. High-risk neuroblastomas, prevalent in the majority of patients, are rapidly progressive; even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal2,3. Here we report the detection of previously unknown mutations in the ALK gene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, in 8% of primary neuroblastomas. Five non-synonymous sequence variations were identified in the kinase domain of ALK, of which three were somatic and two were germline. The most frequent mutation, F1174L, was also identified in three different neuroblastoma cell lines. ALK cDNAs encoding the F1174L and R1275Q variants, but not the wild-type ALK cDNA, transformed IL-3-dependent murine hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells to cytokine-independent growth. Ba/F3 cells expressing these mutations were sensitive to a small-molecule inhibitor of ALK, TAE6844. Furthermore, two human neuroblastoma cell lines harboring the F1174L mutation were sensitive to the inhibitor. Cytotoxicity was associated with increased levels of apoptosis as measured by TUNEL-labeling. shRNA-mediated knockdown of ALK expression in neuroblastoma cell lines with the F1174L mutation also resulted in apoptosis and impaired cell proliferation. Thus, activating alleles of the ALK receptor tyrosine kinase are present in primary neuroblastoma tumors and in established neuroblastoma cell lines, and confer sensitivity to ALK inhibition with small molecules, providing a molecular rationale for targeted therapy of this disease.
doi:10.1038/nature07397
PMCID: PMC2587486  PMID: 18923525

Results 1-25 (29)