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1.  Review of Management and Outcomes in Women with Thrombophilia Risk during Pregnancy at a Single Institution 
ISRN Obstetrics and Gynecology  2014;2014:381826.
Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). We retrospectively studied 38 Caucasian pregnant women with thrombophilia risk and compared their obstetric outcomes with a matched cohort without known thrombophilia risk during the period between January 2007 and December 2010. There were (2) cases with factor V Leiden, (6) prothrombin gene mutation, (1) antithrombin III deficiency, (2) protein C deficiency, (3) protein S deficiency, (10) MTHFR mutation, (7) anti-cardiolipin antibodies, and (1) lupus anticoagulant. Patients without thrombophilia who presented with recurrent unprovoked VTE were considered as high risk (6 cases). Most patients received anticoagulation (34/38) with aspirin only (6), enoxaparin (27), and warfarin (1). Twenty-six out of thirty-eight pregnant women (68.4%) with an increased risk of thrombophilia experienced one or more obstetric complications defined as hypertension, preeclampsia, placenta abruptio, VTE, and oligohydramnios, compared with 15 out of 40 (37.5%) pregnant women in the control group (OR 3.6; 95% CI 1.42, 9.21, P < 0.001). The incidence of obstetric complications was significantly higher in the thrombophilia group compared to the controls. However, these complications were the lowest among patients who received full-dose anticoagulation. Our study suggests that strict application of anticoagulation therapy for thrombophilia of pregnancy is associated with an improved pregnancy outcome. The study was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry under ACTRN12612001094864.
doi:10.1155/2014/381826
PMCID: PMC3945432  PMID: 24693443
2.  Three-year follow-up of a randomised clinical trial of intravenous versus oral iron for anaemia in pregnancy 
BMJ Open  2012;2(5):e000998.
Background
To date, there are no data available concerning the impact of iron therapy on the long-term well-being and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in pregnancy.
Objective
To assess the long-term effect of iron therapy on HRQoL in pregnancy.
Design
This is a follow-up study conducted between January 2010 and January 2011 of an earlier randomised open-label clinical trial of intravenous and oral iron versus oral iron for pregnancy-related iron deficiency anaemia. We used a modified version of the SF-36 questionnaire together with the original prospective HRQoL data collected during and after pregnancy.
Participants and interventions
Of the original evaluable 183 pregnant Caucasian women randomised to receive oral iron or a single intravenous iron polymaltose infusion followed by oral iron maintenance, 126 women completed the follow-up HRQoL study.
Methods
The participants were followed up 4 weeks after treatment, predelivery and postdelivery for a median period of 32 months (range, 26–42) with a well-being and HRQoL questionnaire using a modified SF-36 QoL-survey and child growth charts as set by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG).
Results
Patients who received intravenous iron demonstrated significantly higher haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels (p<0.001). There were strong associations between iron status and a number of the HRQoL parameters, with improved general health (p<0.001), improved vitality (physical energy) (p<0.001), less psychological downheartedness (p=0.005), less clinical depression (p=0.003) and overall improved mental health (p<0.001). The duration of breastfeeding was longer (p=0.046) in the intravenous iron group. The babies born in both groups recorded similarly on APEG growth chart assessments.
Conclusions
Our data suggest that HRQoL is improved until after pregnancy in anaemic pregnant women by repletion of their iron stores during pregnancy. About 80% of the intravenous iron group showed a maintained normal ferritin until delivery with long-term benefits. Further studies to confirm these findings are warranted.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-000998
PMCID: PMC3488743  PMID: 23087011
Qualitative Research
3.  Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Pathophysiology and Effect of Oral versus Intravenous Iron Therapy 
Journal of Pregnancy  2012;2012:630519.
Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization's global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.
doi:10.1155/2012/630519
PMCID: PMC3389687  PMID: 22792466

Results 1-3 (3)