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1.  Changes in Body Mass Index Following HAART Initiation among HIV-Infected Women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study 
Objective
Examine changes in, and factors associated with changing body mass index (BMI) in women following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation.
Methods
1177 HIV-infected Women's Interagency HIV Study participants who contributed 10,754 years of follow-up following HAART initiation were studied. Changes in median BMI up to 15 years following HAART initiation, and the highest and lowest BMI reached following HAART initiation were summarized by pre-HAART BMI category (<18.5 [underweight], 18.5–<25.0 [normal weight], 25.0–<30.0 [overweight], 30.0–<40.0 [obese], and ≥ 40.0 [morbidly obese]). Multivariate mixed effects ordinal logistic regression estimated the degree of association of each exposure of interest with post-HAART BMI.
Results
Before HAART, 39% percent of women had normal BMI, 31% were overweight, 23% were obese, and 5% were morbidly obese. Following HAART initiation, median BMI change (per 5 years) was 0.21 kg/m2 (90% confidence interval [CI]: −1.33, 0.42) for those with normal pre-HAART BMI, 0.39 kg/m2 (90% CI: 0.15,0.66) for overweight, 0.31 kg/m2 (90% CI: −1.18,0.67) for obese, and −0.36kg/m2 for morbidly obese women. After initiating HAART, 40% with normal pre-HAART BMI became overweight at some point; of those overweight, 46% remained overweight and 47% became obese; 71% of obese women remained obese and 27% became morbidly obese. Each year of nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor use was associated with a 3% decreased odds of reaching a higher BMI category (OR 0.97, 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99), while each year of protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor use were associated with a 6% (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.08) and 5%(OR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.08) increased odds of having a higher BMI category, respectively.
Conclusions
Although overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in this large cohort of HIV-infected, minority women, HAART use was associated with only a modest increase in BMI over time.
doi:10.4172/2155-6113.1000323
PMCID: PMC4285631  PMID: 25580365
Obesity; Body mass index; HIV; Women; HAART; Women's interagency HIV study
2.  Body Mass Index, Weight Change, and Clinical Progression in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease 
The speed and severity of clinical progression after Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) diagnosis varies and depends on multiple factors, most not well elucidated. We assessed whether body mass index (BMI) and one-year weight change (WC) are associated with clinical progression in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and early-stage AD. Longitudinal data comprising 2,268 aMCI and 1,506 AD participants in the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set were used to examine nuances of clinical progression by BMI and WC, as well as potential variations in associations by age, sex, BMI (WC model), or apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype. In aMCI, high BMI (versus moderate BMI) was associated with slower progression; weight loss (versus no WC) was associated with faster progression. In AD, no significant differences were observed in clinical progression by BMI or WC. The association between BMI and clinical progression varied significantly by APOE genotype in AD, and the association between WC and clinical progression varied significantly by sex and BMI in aMCI. Baseline BMI and one-year WC in late-life may serve as early prognostic indicators in aMCI and early-stage AD. If replicated, these results may help in counseling patients on anticipated clinical progression and suggest windows of opportunity for intervention.
doi:10.1097/WAD.0000000000000005
PMCID: PMC3945175  PMID: 24126214
Body Mass Index; Body Weight Changes; Weight Loss; Alzheimer Disease; Mild Cognitive Impairment; Disease Progression
3.  Anthropometric measures and cognition in middle-aged HIV-infected and uninfected women. The Women's Interagency HIV Study 
Journal of neurovirology  2013;19(6):574-585.
Objective
To explore the relationship of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with cognition in women with (HIV+) and without HIV (HIV-) infection.
Design/Methods
1690 participants (1196 HIV+, 494 HIV-) in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) with data available on anthropometric measures comprise the analytical sample. Cross-sectional analyses using linear regression models estimated the relationship between anthropometric variables and Trails A, Trails B, Stroop interference time, Stroop word recall, Stroop color naming and reading, and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) with consideration for age, HIV infection status, Wide Range Achievement Test score, CD4 count, insulin resistance, drug use, and race/ethnicity.
Results
Among HIV+ women, BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 was associated with poorer cognitive performance evidenced by longer Trails A and Trails B and shorter SDMT completion times. An obese BMI (30 kg/m2 or higher) was related to better performance on Trails B and worse performance on the Stroop Interference test. Among HIV- women, an obese BMI was related to worse performance on the Stroop – Color naming test. Few and inconsistent associations were observed between WC, WHR and cognition.
Conclusion
Among women at mid-life with chronic (at least 10 years) HIV infection, common anthropometric measures, primarily BMI, were differentially related to cognitive test performance by cognitive domain. Higher levels of BMI were associated with better cognitive function. In this era of antiretroviral therapies, restoration of health evidenced as higher BMI due to effective antiretroviral therapies, may improve cognitive function in middle-aged HIV infected women.
doi:10.1007/s13365-013-0219-1
PMCID: PMC3957488  PMID: 24338243
Cognition; HIV; Women; Overweight; Obesity; Middle-Aged
4.  Serum biomarkers of immune activation and subsequent risk of non-Hodgkin B cell lymphoma among HIV-infected women 
Background
There is increasing evidence that chronic immune activation predisposes to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Whether this association exists among women representative of the current HIV epidemic in the U.S. who are at high risk of HIV-associated NHL (AIDS-NHL), remains to be determined.
Methods
We conducted a nested case-control study within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study with longitudinally collected risk factor data and sera. Cases were HIV-infected women with stored sera collected at three time-windows 3–5 years, 1–3 years, and 0–1 year prior to AIDS-NHL diagnosis (n=22). Three to six HIV-infected controls, without AIDS-NHL, were matched to each case on age, race, CD4+ T cell count, and study follow-up time (n=78). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between one unit increase in log-transformed biomarker levels and AIDS-NHL were computed using random effect multivariate logistic regression models.
Results
Elevated levels of sCD27 (OR=7.21, 95% CI=2.62–19.88), sCD30 (OR=2.64, 95% CI=1.24–5.64), and CXCL13 (OR=2.56, 95% CI=1.32–4.96) were associated with subsequent diagnosis of AIDS-NHL overall. Elevated sCD23 was associated with a 2-to 4-fold increased risk of AIDS-NHL in certain subgroups, while elevated IL6 was associated with a 2-fold increased risk in the 0–1 year time-window, only.
Conclusion
These findings support the hypothesis that chronic B cell activation contributes to the development of AIDS-NHL in women.
Impact
sCD23, sCD27, sCD30, and CXCL13 may serve as biomarkers for AIDS-NHL.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0614
PMCID: PMC3833437  PMID: 24045923
lymphoma; B cell; cytokines; AIDS; immune activation
5.  Host APOL1 genotype is independently associated with proteinuria in HIV infection 
Kidney international  2013;84(4):834-840.
Proteinuria is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in HIV infection. Here we evaluated whether APOL1 risk alleles, previously associated with advanced kidney disease, is independently associated with proteinuria in HIV infection in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study. We estimated the percent difference in urine protein excretion and odds of proteinuria (200 mg/g and higher) associated with two versus one or no APOL1 risk allele using linear and logistic regression, respectively. Of 1285 women successfully genotyped, 379 carried one and 80 carried two risk alleles. Proteinuria was present in 124 women; 78 of whom had proteinuria confirmed on a second sample. In women without prior AIDS, two risk alleles were independently associated with a 69% higher urine protein excretion (95% CI: 36%, 108%) and 5-fold higher odds of proteinuria (95% CI: 2.45, 10.37) versus one or no risk allele. No association was found in women with prior AIDS. Analyses in which women with impaired kidney function were excluded and proteinuria was confirmed by a second urine sample yielded similar estimates. Thus, APOL1 risk alleles are associated with significant proteinuria in HIV-infected persons without prior clinical AIDS, independent of clinical factors traditionally associated with proteinuria. Trials are needed to determine whether APOL1 genotyping identifies individuals who could benefit from earlier intervention to prevent overt renal disease.
doi:10.1038/ki.2013.203
PMCID: PMC3788838  PMID: 23715117
6.  Sex differences in stroke 
Sex differences in stroke are observed across epidemiologic studies, pathophysiology, treatments, and outcomes. These sex differences have profound implications for effective prevention and treatment and are the focus of this review. Epidemiologic studies reveal a clear age-by-sex interaction in stroke prevalence, incidence, and mortality. While premenopausal women experience fewer strokes than men of comparable age, stroke rates increase among postmenopausal women compared with age-matched men. This postmenopausal phenomenon, in combination with living longer, are reasons for women being older at stroke onset and suffering more severe strokes. Thus, a primary focus of stroke prevention has been based on sex steroid hormone-dependent mechanisms. Sex hormones affect different (patho)physiologic functions of the cerebral circulation. Clarifying the impact of sex hormones on cerebral vasculature using suitable animal models is essential to elucidate male–female differences in stroke pathophysiology and development of sex-specific treatments. Much remains to be learned about sex differences in stroke as anatomic and genetic factors may also contribute, revealing its multifactorial nature. In addition, the aftermath of stroke appears to be more adverse in women than in men, again based on older age at stroke onset, longer prehospital delays, and potentially, differences in treatment.
doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2012.141
PMCID: PMC3519418  PMID: 23032484
epidemiology; gender; pathophysiology; risk factors; steroids; stroke
7.  High adiposity: risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? 
Higher levels of total and central adiposity, measured as higher body mass index (BMI) (in kilograms per square meter), waist circumference, or waist-to-hip ratio, have been associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, some epidemiologic studies do not support this association, and potential underlying biological mechanisms that provide biological plausibility are not clear in terms of providing direct links to adipose tissue. Studies linking adiposity to AD have considered adiposity measures from mid-life and late-life. Given an evolving background trajectory of BMI that exists over the life course and the influence of dementia processes on BMI, results have been conflicting depending on when BMI is measured in relationship to clinical AD onset. This has made interpretation of the BMI-AD literature difficult. This debate will briefly review the epidemiologic evidence for and against an association between higher adiposity and AD, issues of timing of the adiposity measure in relation to AD onset, potential biological mechanisms for observed associations, and explanations for conflicting evidence.
doi:10.1186/alzrt221
PMCID: PMC4056613  PMID: 24932225
8.  Acupuncture and physical exercise for affective symptoms and health-related quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome: secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial 
Background
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have symptoms of depression and anxiety and impaired health related quality of life (HRQoL). Here we test the post-hoc hypothesis that acupuncture and exercise improve depression and anxiety symptoms and HRQoL in PCOS women.
Methods
Seventy-two PCOS women were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of 1) acupuncture (n = 28); 2) exercise (n = 29); or 3) no intervention (control) (n = 15). Outcome measures included: change in Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA-S), Swedish Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and PCOS Questionnaire (PCOSQ) scores from baseline to after 16-week intervention, and to 16-week post-intervention follow-up.
Results
A reduction in MADRS-S and BSA-S from baseline to 16-weeks post-intervention follow-up was observed for the acupuncture group. The SF-36 domains role physical, energy/vitality, general health perception and the mental component of summary scores improved in the acupuncture group after intervention and at follow-up. Within the exercise group the role physical decreased after treatment, while physical functioning and general health perception scores increased at follow-up. The emotion domain in the PCOSQ improved after 16-weeks of intervention within all three groups, and at follow-up in acupuncture and exercise groups. At follow-up, improvement in the infertility domain was observed within the exercise group.
Conclusion
There was a modest improvement in depression and anxiety scores in women treated with acupuncture, and improved HRQoL scores were noted in both intervention groups. While not a primary focus of the trial, these data suggest continued investigation of mental health outcomes in women treated for PCOS.
Trial registration number
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00484705
doi:10.1186/1472-6882-13-131
PMCID: PMC3684530  PMID: 23763822
Acupuncture; Anxiety; Depression; Exercise; Health-related quality of life; Polycystic ovary syndrome
9.  THE GENETIC ARCHITECTURE OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: BEYOND APP, PSENs AND APOE 
Neurobiology of Aging  2010;33(3):437-456.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex disorder with a clear genetic component. Three genes have been identified as the cause of early onset familial AD (EOAD). The most common form of the disease is, however, a sporadic one presenting itself in later stages of life (LOAD). The genetic component of this late onset form of AD has been the target of a large number of studies, since only one genetic risk factor (APOE4) has been consistently associated with the disease. However, technological advances allow new approaches in the study of complex disorders. In this review, we discuss the new results produced by genome wide association studies, in light of the current knowledge of the complexity of AD genetics.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.03.025
PMCID: PMC2980860  PMID: 20594621
10.  Temporal Lobe Atrophy and White Matter Lesions are Related to Major Depression over 5 years in the Elderly 
Neuropsychopharmacology  2010;35(13):2638-2645.
The influence of organic brain changes on the development of depression in the elderly is uncertain. Cross-sectional studies, most often from clinical samples, report associations with brain atrophy and cerebrovascular disease, while longitudinal population studies have given mixed results. Our aim was to investigate whether cortical atrophy and white matter lesions (WMLs) on computed tomography (CT) predict occurrence of depression in the elderly. This is a prospective population-based study with 5-year follow-up. The baseline sample included 525 elderly subjects, aged 70–86 years, without dementia or major depression, with a score on the Mini-Mental State Examination above 25, and without dementia at follow-up. Cortical atrophy and WMLs were evaluated at baseline using CT. The main outcome measure was development of major or minor depression at follow-up according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, as evaluated using neuropsychiatric examinations and hospital discharge registers. Logistic regression was used to estimate risk. Over the period of 5 years, 20 individuals developed major and 63 minor depression. Presence of temporal lobe atrophy (odds ratio (OR)=2.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–7.62) and moderate-to-severe WMLs (OR=3.21, 95% CI 1.00–10.26) independently predicted major, but not minor, depression after controlling for various confounders. Other brain changes did not predict occurrence of depression. Our findings suggest that temporal lobe atrophy and WMLs represent relatively independent and complementary pathways to major depression in the elderly. This may have implications for prevention, as both neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease have been related to preventable factors.
doi:10.1038/npp.2010.176
PMCID: PMC3055580  PMID: 20881949
depression; elderly; brain atrophy; white matter lesions; population; longitudinal; aging/geriatrics; imaging, clinical or preclinical; epidemiology; depression, unipolar/bipolar; brain atrophy; longitudinal; white matter lesions; depression; population
11.  Thyroid Hormones Are Associated with Poorer Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment 
Background
Alterations in interrelated endocrine axes may be related to the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia.
Methods
Salivary cortisol before and after a 0.5-mg dexamethasone test, and serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, total thyroxine (T4), free T4, total triiodothyronine (TT3), estradiol, testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 were measured in 43 MCI cases and 26 healthy controls. All participants underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery covering the cognitive domains of speed/attention, memory, visuospatial functions, language and executive functions.
Results
The MCI group did not differ in basal levels of endocrine markers compared to controls. Among those with MCI, TT3 levels were inversely associated with cognitive performance across all domains. After stratifying MCI cases according to TT3 levels, those with relatively high TT3 levels showed impairment in memory as well as in visuospatial and executive functions. Those with TT3 levels at or below the lower boundary of the normal range performed comparably to healthy controls. Other endocrine markers were not related to cognitive performance.
Conclusions
Among those with MCI, TT3 was associated with a neuropsychological profile typical of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. While the mechanisms remain unclear, optimal levels of thyroid hormone under a compromising condition such as MCI and related neuropathology need reconsideration.
doi:10.1159/000319746
PMCID: PMC2948659  PMID: 20798541
Mild cognitive impairment; Neuropsychology; Cortisol; Thyroid hormones; Insulin-like growth factor 1; Sex steroids
12.  Association of the RAGE G82S polymorphism with Alzheimer’s disease 
Journal of Neural Transmission  2010;117(7):861-867.
The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been implicated in several pathophysiological processes relevant to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including transport and synaptotoxicity of AD-associated amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. A recent Chinese study (Li et al. in J Neural Transm 117:97–104, 2010) suggested an association between the 82S allele of the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G82S (rs2070600) in the RAGE-encoding gene AGER and risk of AD. The present study aimed to investigate associations between AGER, AD diagnosis, cognitive scores and cerebrospinal fluid AD biomarkers in a European cohort of 316 neurochemically verified AD cases and 579 controls. Aside from G82S, three additional tag SNPs were analyzed to cover the common genetic variation in AGER. The 82S allele was associated with increased risk of AD (Pc = 0.04, OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4). There was no genetic interaction between AGER 82S and APOE ε4 in producing increased risk of AD (P = 0.4), and none of the AGER SNPs showed association with Aβ42, T-tau, P-tau181 or mini-mental state examination scores. The data speak for a weak, but significant effect of AGER on risk of AD.
doi:10.1007/s00702-010-0437-0
PMCID: PMC2895876  PMID: 20567859
Alzheimer’s disease; RAGE; AGER; Advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor; SNP; Haplotype
13.  Cerebrospinal fluid β‐amyloid 1–42 concentration may predict cognitive decline in older women 
Background
Low levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β‐amyloid 1–42 (Aβ42) and high total tau (T‐tau) are diagnostic for manifest Alzheimer's disease. It is not known, however, whether these biomarkers may be risk indicators for cognitive decline in otherwise healthy older people.
Methods
The longitudinal relationship between CSF markers, Aβ42 and T‐tau, measured in 1992, and change in Mini‐Mental State Examination (ΔMMSE) score between 1992 and 2002 were investigated in 55 women (aged 70–84 years, mean (SD) MMSE score = 28.3 (1.5)), who were participants in the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden. These women did not have dementia when they experienced lumbar puncture in 1992–3.
Results
Over the 8‐year follow‐up period, ΔMMSE (range =  +3 to −21 points) was correlated with Aβ42 (Spearman's r = 0.40, p = 0.002), such that lower levels of Aβ42 were related to greater decline. This was also observed after excluding 4 women who developed dementia between 1992 and 2002 (Spearman's r = 0.34, p = 0.019). A multivariate logistic regression model predicting a decline of ⩾5 points on the MMSE (observed in six women), or a risk of developing dementia over the 8‐year follow‐up period (observed in four women), including age, education, Aβ42 and T‐tau as covariates, showed that Aβ42 was the sole predictor of significant cognitive decline or dementia (OR per 100 pg/ml Aβ42 = 2.24, 95% CI 1.19 to 4.22, p = 0.013).
Conclusions
Low levels of CSF Aβ42 may predict cognitive decline among older women without dementia.
doi:10.1136/jnnp.2006.100529
PMCID: PMC2117838  PMID: 17098843
14.  Adiposity and Alzheimer’s Disease 
Purpose of the review
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. There are no known preventive or curative measures. There is increasing evidence for the role of total adiposity, usually measured clinically as body mass index (BMI), and central adiposity, measured in AD. This topic is of enormous public health importance given the global epidemic of high adiposity and its consequences.
Recent findings
Salient publications in 2007 and 2008 showed that a) central adiposity in middle age predicts dementia in old age; b) the relation between high adiposity and dementia is attenuated with older age; c) waist circumference in old age, a measure of central adiposity, may be a better predictor of dementia than BMI, d) lower BMI predicts dementia in the elderly; e) weight loss may precede dementia diagnosis by decades, which may explain seemingly paradoxical findings.
Summary
The possibility that high adiposity increases AD risk is alarming given global trends of overweight and obesity in the general population. However, prevention and manipulation of adiposity may also provide a means to prevent AD. Treatment of weight loss in AD may also be important but is beyond the score of this review.
doi:10.1097/MCO.0b013e32831c8c71
PMCID: PMC2771208  PMID: 19057182
Alzheimer’s disease; dementia; adiposity; overweight; obese; body weight
15.  Adiposity, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease 
This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence linking the continuum of adiposity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanisms relating adiposity and T2D to AD may include hyperinsulinemia, advanced products of glycosilation, cerebrovascular disease, and products of adipose tissue metabolism. Elevated adiposity in middle age is related to a higher risk of AD but the data on this association in old age is conflicting. Several studies have shown that hyperinsulinemia, a consequence of higher adiposity and insulin resistance is also related to a higher risk of AD. Hyperinsulinemia is a risk factor for T2D, and numerous studies have shown a relation of T2D with higher AD risk. The implication of these associations is that a large proportion of the world population may be at increased risk of AD given the trends for increasing prevalence of overweight, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and T2D. However these associations may present a unique opportunity for prevention and treatment of AD. Several studies in the prevention and treatment of T2D are currently conducting or have planned cognition ancillary studies. In addition, clinical trials using insulin sensitizers in the treatment or prevention of AD are under way.
doi:10.3233/JAD-2009-1022
PMCID: PMC2705908  PMID: 19387106
adiposity; overweight; obesity; hyperinsulinemia; insulin; glucose; type 2 diabetes; alzheimer's disease; cognitive impairment
16.  Secular trends in self reported sexual activity and satisfaction in Swedish 70 year olds: cross sectional survey of four populations, 1971-2001 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;337(7662):151-154.
Objective To study secular trends in self reported sexual behaviour among 70 year olds.
Design Cross sectional survey.
Settings Four samples representative of the general population in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Participants 1506 adults (946 women, 560 men) examined in 1971-2, 1976-7, 1992-3, and 2000-1.
Main outcome measures Sexual intercourse, attitudes to sexuality in later life, sexual dysfunctions, and marital satisfaction.
Results From 1971 to 2000 the proportion of 70 year olds reporting sexual intercourse increased among all groups: married men from 52% to 68% (P=0.002), married women from 38% to 56% (P=0.001), unmarried men from 30% to 54% (P=0.016), and unmarried women from 0.8% to 12% (P<0.001). Men and women from later birth cohorts reported higher satisfaction with sexuality, fewer sexual dysfunctions, and more positive attitudes to sexuality in later life than those from earlier birth cohorts. A larger proportion of men (57% v 40%, P<0.001) and women (52% v 35%, P<0.001) reported very happy relationships in 2000-1 compared with those in 1971-2. Sexual debut before age 20 increased in both sexes: in men from 52% to 77% (P<0.001) and in women from 19% to 64% (P<0.001).
Conclusion Self reported quantity and quality of sexual experiences among Swedish 70 year olds has improved over a 30 year period.
doi:10.1136/bmj.a279
PMCID: PMC2483873  PMID: 18614505
17.  Secular trends in self reported sexual activity and satisfaction in Swedish 70 year olds: cross sectional survey of four populations, 1971-2001 
Objective To study secular trends in self reported sexual behaviour among 70 year olds.
Design Cross sectional survey.
Settings Four samples representative of the general population in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Participants 1506 adults (946 women, 560 men) examined in 1971-2, 1976-7, 1992-3, and 2000-1.
Main outcome measures Sexual intercourse, attitudes to sexuality in later life, sexual dysfunctions, and marital satisfaction.
Results From 1971 to 2000 the proportion of 70 year olds reporting sexual intercourse increased among all groups: married men from 52% to 68% (P=0.002), married women from 38% to 56% (P=0.001), unmarried men from 30% to 54% (P=0.016), and unmarried women from 0.8% to 12% (P<0.001). Men and women from later birth cohorts reported higher satisfaction with sexuality, fewer sexual dysfunctions, and more positive attitudes to sexuality in later life than those from earlier birth cohorts. A larger proportion of men (57% v 40%, P<0.001) and women (52% v 35%, P<0.001) reported very happy relationships in 2000-1 compared with those in 1971-2. Sexual debut before age 20 increased in both sexes: in men from 52% to 77% (P<0.001) and in women from 19% to 64% (P<0.001).
Conclusion Self reported quantity and quality of sexual experiences among Swedish 70 year olds has improved over a 30 year period.
doi:10.1136/bmj.a279
PMCID: PMC2483873  PMID: 18614505
18.  Association of self-reported race with AIDS death in continuous HAART users in a cohort of HIV-infected women in the United States 
AIDS (London, England)  2013;27(15):2413-2423.
Objective:
To assess the association of race with clinical outcomes in HIV-positive women on continuous HAART.
Design:
Prospective study that enrolled women from 1994 to 1995 and 2001 to 2002.
Setting:
Women's Interagency HIV Study, a community-based cohort in five US cities.
Participants:
One thousand, four hundred and seventy-one HIV-positive continuous HAART users.
Main outcome measures:
Times to AIDS and non-AIDS death and incident AIDS-defining illness (ADI) after HAART initiation.
Results:
In adjusted analyses, black vs. white women had higher rates of AIDS death [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 2.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30, 3.50; P = 0.003] and incident ADI (aHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.08, 2.32; P = 0.02), but not non-AIDS death (aHR 0.91, 95% CI 0.59, 1.39; P = 0.65). Cumulative AIDS death incidence at 10 years was 17.3 and 8.3% for black and white women, respectively. Other significant independent pre-HAART predictors of AIDS death included peak viral load (aHR 1.70 per log10, 95% CI 1.34, 2.16; P < 0.001), nadir CD4+ cell count (aHR 0.65 per 100 cells/μl, 95% CI 0.56, 0.76; P < 0.001), depressive symptoms by Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression score at least 16 (aHR 2.10, 95% CI 1.51, 2.92; P < 0.001), hepatitis C virus infection (aHR 1.57, 95% CI 1.02, 2.40; P = 0.04), and HIV acquisition via transfusion (aHR 2.33, 95% CI 1.21, 4.49; P = 0.01). In models with time-updated HAART adherence, association of race with AIDS death remained statistically significant (aHR 3.09, 95% CI 1.38, 6.93; P = 0.006).
Conclusion:
In continuous HAART-using women, black women more rapidly died from AIDS or experienced incident ADI than their white counterparts after adjusting for confounders. Future studies examining behavioral and biologic factors in these women may further the understanding of HAART prognosis.
doi:10.1097/01.aids.0000432537.92958.73
PMCID: PMC3815041  PMID: 24037210
AIDS; HAART; HIV; race; survival; women

Results 1-18 (18)