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1.  Shared Cell Surface Marker Expression in Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Adult Sarcomas 
Advanced adult soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs) are rare tumors with a dismal prognosis and limited systemic treatment options. STSs may originate from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The goal of this study was to establish the expression pattern of MSC markers in sarcoma cell lines and primary tumor samples by flow cytometry. The data suggest a hierarchical cytoarchitecture of the most common adult type sarcomas and introduce W5C5, TNAP, CD344, and CD271 as potential sarcoma progenitor cell markers.
Advanced adult soft-tissue sarcomas (STSs) are rare tumors with a dismal prognosis and limited systemic treatment options. STSs may originate from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); the latter have mainly been isolated from adult bone marrow as plastic-adherent cells with differentiation capacity into mesenchymal tissues. Recently, a panel of antibodies has been established that allows for the prospective isolation of primary MSCs with high selectivity. Similar to cancer stem cells in other malignancies, sarcoma stem cells may bear immunophenotypic similarity with the corresponding precursor, that is, MSCs. We therefore set out to establish the expression pattern of MSC markers in sarcoma cell lines and primary tumor samples by flow cytometry. In addition, fibroblasts from different sources were examined. The results document a significant amount of MSC markers shared by sarcoma cells. The expression pattern includes uniformly expressed markers, as well as MSC markers that only stained subpopulations of sarcoma cells. Expression of W5C5, W8B2 (tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase [TNAP]), CD344 (frizzled-4), and CD271 marked subpopulations displaying increased proliferation potential. Moreover, CD271+ cells displayed in vitro doxorubicin resistance and an increased capacity to form spheres under serum-free conditions. Interestingly, another set of antigens, including the bona fide progenitor cell markers CD117 and CD133, were not expressed. Comparative expression patterns of novel MSC markers in sarcoma cells, as well as fibroblasts and MSCs, are presented. Our data suggest a hierarchical cytoarchitecture of the most common adult type sarcomas and introduce W5C5, TNAP, CD344, and CD271 as potential sarcoma progenitor cell markers.
doi:10.5966/sctm.2012-0055
PMCID: PMC3659743  PMID: 23283492
Mesenchymal stem cell; Sarcoma stem cell; Cancer stem cell; Stem cell marker
2.  Steady-state neutrophil homeostasis is a demand-driven process 
Cell Cycle  2013;12(5):709-710.
doi:10.4161/cc.23859
PMCID: PMC3610712  PMID: 23422860
steady-state; granulopoiesis; neutrophil homeostasis; G-CSF; mesenchymal stem cells; TLR signaling; innate immunity; commensal flora
3.  Severe paraneoplastic hypereosinophilia in metastatic renal cell carcinoma 
BMC Urology  2012;12:7.
Background
Renal cell carcinoma can cause various paraneoplastic syndromes including metabolic and hematologic disturbances. Paraneoplastic hypereosinophilia has been reported in a variety of hematologic and solid tumors. We present the first case in the literature of severe paraneoplastic hypereosinophilia in a patient with renal cell carcinoma.
Case presentation
A 46 year-old patient patient with a history of significant weight loss, reduced general state of health and coughing underwent radical nephrectomy for metastasized renal cell carcinoma. Three weeks after surgery, the patient presented with excessive peripheral hypereosinophilia leading to profound neurological symptoms due to cerebral microinfarction. Systemic treatment with prednisolone, hydroxyurea, vincristine, cytarabine, temsirolimus and sunitinib led to reduction of peripheral eosinophils but could not prevent rapid disease progression of the patient. At time of severe leukocytosis, a considerable increase of cytokines associated with hypereosinophilia was measurable.
Conclusions
Paraneoplastic hypereosinophilia in patients with renal cell carcinoma might indicate poor prognosis and rapid disease progression. Myelosuppressive therapy is required in symptomatic patients.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-12-7
PMCID: PMC3348004  PMID: 22436420
Paraneoplastic; Hypereosinophilia; Leukocytosis; Renal cell carcinoma; Leukemoid reaction; Encephalopathy

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