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1.  Squamous Cell Papilloma of the Urinary Bladder Endoscopically Mimicking Cancer 
Case Reports in Pathology  2013;2013:486312.
Squamous cell lesions of the urinary bladder are generally rare. Herein we describe a case of 74-year-old male patient with a benign squamous cell papilloma. Histologically, the tumor presented extensive keratinization at its surface and showed no nuclear atypia or stromal invasion. The tumor cells were negative for HPV DNA. These lesions are extremely rare, and even though they are considered benign and non-HPV related, they should be followed, since recurrence has been reported.
doi:10.1155/2013/486312
PMCID: PMC3789276  PMID: 24159399
2.  New Artificial Urinary Sphincter Devices in the Treatment of Male Iatrogenic Incontinence 
Advances in Urology  2012;2012:439372.
Severe persistent stress incontinence following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer treatment, although not very common, remains the most annoying complication affecting patient's quality of life, despite good surgical oncological results. When severe incontinence persists after the first postoperative year and conservative treatment has been failed, surgical treatment has to be considered. In these cases it is generally accepted that artificial urinary sphincter is the gold standard treatment. AUS 800 by American Medical Systems has been successfully used for more than 35 years. Recently three more sphincter devices, the Flow-Secure, the Periurethral Constrictor, and the ZSI 375, have been developed and presented in the market. A novel type of artificial urinary sphincter, the Tape Mechanical Occlusive Device, has been inserted in live canines as well as in human cadavers. These new sphincter devices are discussed in this paper focusing on safety and clinical results.
doi:10.1155/2012/439372
PMCID: PMC3332164  PMID: 22567002
3.  Treatment of obstructive uropathy in one of three young brothers suffering from Gorlin-Cohen syndrome: a case report 
BMC Urology  2012;12:2.
Background
Frontometaphyseal dysplasia, or Gorlin-Cohen syndrome, is an X-linked disorder primarily characterized by skeletal dysplasia, such as hyperostosis of the skull and abnormalities of tubular bone modeling. Some patients develop extraskeletal manifestations, such as urinary tract anomalies.
Case presentation
A 26-year-old male patient was diagnosed with frontometaphyseal dysplasia and suffered from chronic urine retention. Although the patient was primarily diagnosed with a neurogenic bladder, our work-up revealed posterior urethral valves, bladder neck stenosis, and multiple bladder stones. The patient was treated by transurethral resection of the urethral valves and bladder neck with simultaneous open cystolithotomy to remove the bladder calculi. After removal of the catheter, the patient voided normally and had no post-void residual urine. At the 1-year follow-up, he was still voiding normally; his urodynamic investigation was also normal.
Conclusions
In the recent literature, there is scarce information on the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with malformations of the urinary tract as a result of Gorlin-Cohen syndrome. The case presented here could guide urological approaches to patients suffering from this rare condition.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-12-2
PMCID: PMC3268711  PMID: 22233653

Results 1-3 (3)