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1.  Loss of PTEN Is Associated with Aggressive Behavior in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer 
Background
The associations of ERG overexpression with clinical behavior and molecular pathways of prostate cancer are incompletely known. We assessed the association of ERG expression with AR, PTEN, SPINK1, Ki-67, and EZH2 expression levels, deletion, and mutations of chromosomal region 3p14 and TP53, and clinicopathologic variables.
Methods
The material consisted of 326 prostatectomies, 166 needle biopsies from men treated primarily with endocrine therapy, 177 transurethral resections of castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), and 114 CRPC metastases obtained from 32 men. Immunohistochemistry, FISH, and sequencing was used for the measurements.
Results
ERG expression was found in about 45% of all patient cohorts. In a multivariate analysis, ERG expression showed independent value of favorable prognosis (P = 0.019). ERG positivity was significantly associated with loss of PTEN expression in prostatectomy (P = 0.0348), and locally recurrent CRPCs (P = 0.0042). Loss of PTEN expression was associated (P = 0.0085) with shorter progression-free survival in ERG-positive, but not in negative cases. When metastases in each subject were compared, consistent ERG, PTEN, and AR expression as well as TP53 mutations were found in a majority of subjects.
Conclusions
A similar frequency of ERG positivity from early to late stage of the disease suggests lack of selection of ERG expression during disease progression. The prognostic significance of PTEN loss solely in ERG-positive cases indicates interaction of these pathways. The finding of consistent genetic alterations in different metastases suggests that the major genetic alterations take place in the primary tumor.
Impact
Interaction of PTEN and ERG pathways warrants further studies.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0333-T
PMCID: PMC4086660  PMID: 24083995
2.  Overall and worst gleason scores are equally good predictors of prostate cancer progression 
BMC Urology  2011;11:21.
Background
Gleason scoring has experienced several modifications during the past decade. So far, only one study has compared the prognostic abilities of worst (WGS) and overall (OGS) modified Gleason scores after the ISUP 2005 conference. Prostatic needle biopsies are individually paraffin-embedded in 57% of European pathology laboratories, whereas the rest of laboratories embed multiple (2 - 6) biopsies per one paraffin-block. Differences in the processing method can have a far-reaching effect, because reporting of the Gleason score (GS) is different for individually embedded and pooled biopsies, and GS is one of the most important factors when selecting treatment for patients.
Methods
The study material consisted of needle biopsies from 236 prostate cancer patients that were endocrine-treated in 1999-2003. Biopsies from left side and right side were embedded separately. Haematoxylin-eosin-stained slides were scanned and analyzed on web-based virtual microscopy. Worst and overall Gleason scores were assessed according to the modified Gleason score schema after analyzing each biopsy separately. The compound Gleason scores (CGS) were obtained from the original pathology reports. Two different grade groupings were used: GS 6 or less vs. 7 vs. 8 or above; and GS 7(3 + 4) or less vs. 7(4 + 3) and 8 vs. 9-10. The prognostic ability of the three scoring methods to predict biochemical progression was compared with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses.
Results
The median follow-up time of the patients was 64.5 months (range 0-118). The modified GS criteria led to upgrading of the Gleason sums compared to the original CGS from the pathology reports 1999-2003 (mean 7.0 for CGS, 7.5 for OGS, 7.6 for WGS). In 43 cases WGS was > OGS. In a univariate analysis the relative risks were 2.1 (95%-confidence interval 1.8-2.4) for CGS, 2.5 (2.1-2.8) for OGS, and 2.6 (2.2-2.9) for WGS. In a multivariate analysis, OGS was the only independent prognostic factor.
Conclusions
All of the three Gleason scoring methods are strong predictors of biochemical recurrence. The use of modified Gleason scoring leads to upgrading of GS, but also improves the prognostic value of the scoring. No significant prognostic differences between OGS and WGS could be shown, which may relate to the apparent narrowing of the GS scale from 2-10 to 5-10 due to the recent modifications.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-11-21
PMCID: PMC3193164  PMID: 21978318

Results 1-2 (2)