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1.  Chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1 (CXCL1) protein expression is increased in aggressive bladder cancers 
BMC Cancer  2013;13:322.
Background
Chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), may regulate tumor epithelial-stromal interactions that facilitate tumor growth and invasion. Studies have linked CXCL1 expression to gastric, colon and skin cancers, but limited studies to date have described CXCL1 protein expression in human bladder cancer (BCa).
Methods
CXCL1 protein expression was examined in 152 bladder tissue specimens (142 BCa) by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of CXCL1 was scored by assigning a combined score based on the proportion of cells staining and intensity of staining. CXCL1 expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological features and follow-up data.
Results
CXCL1 protein expression was present in cancerous tissues, but was entirely absent in benign tissue. CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was significantly higher in high-grade tumors relative to low-grade tumors (p = 0.012). Similarly, CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was higher in high stage tumors (T2-T4) than in low stage tumors (Ta-T1) (p < 0.0001). An increase in the combined immunostaining score of CXCL1 was also associated with reduced disease-specific survival.
Conclusion
To date, this is the largest study describing increased CXCL1 protein expression in more aggressive phenotypes in human BCa. Further studies are warranted to define the role CXCL1 plays in bladder carcinogenesis and progression.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-13-322
PMCID: PMC3708804  PMID: 23815949
Bladder Cancer; Chemokine Ligand 1 (CXCL1); Tumor Grade; Tumor Stage
2.  VEGF, CA9 and Angiogenin as a Urinary Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Detection 
Urology  2012;79(5):1185.e1-1185.e6.
Objective
To investigate whether elevated urinary levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and angiogenin are associated with BCa.
Methods
This is a case-control study in which voided urines from 127 patients: control subjects (n = 63) and tumor bearing subjects (n = 64) were analyzed. The urinary concentrations of VEGF, CA9, angiogenin and BTA were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We used the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic curves to determine the ability of VEGF, CA9, and angiogenin to detect BCa in voided urine samples. Data were also compared to a commercial ELISA-based BCa detection assay (BTA-Trak©). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated.
Results
Urinary concentrations of VEGF, CA9, angiogenin and BTA were significantly elevated in BCa. VEGF was the most accurate urinary biomarker (AUC: 0.886; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8301–0.9418). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis highlighted VEGF (OR: 5.90; 95% CI: 2.60–13.40, p < 0.0001) as an independent variable. The sensitivities and specificities for VEGF (sensitivity, 83% and specificity, 87%) outperformed BTA (sensitivity, 80% and specificity, 84%).
Conclusions
VEGF may be a valuable addition to voided urine sample analysis for the detection of BCa. Larger, prospective studies are needed to determine the clinical utility of urinary VEGF and angiogenin as biomarkers in the non-invasive evaluation of BCa patients.
doi:10.1016/j.urology.2012.01.016
PMCID: PMC3341520  PMID: 22386755
angiogenin; bladder cancer; biomarkers; diagnosis; VEGF
3.  CCL18 in a Multiplex Urine-Based Assay for the Detection of Bladder Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(5):e37797.
The early detection of bladder cancer (BCa) is pivotal for successful patient treatment and management. Through genomic and proteomic studies, we have identified a number of bladder cancer-associated biomarkers that have potential clinical utility. In a case-control study, we examined voided urines from 127 subjects: 64 tumor-bearing subjects and 63 controls. The urine concentrations of the following proteins were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); C-C motif chemokine 18 (CCL18), Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and CD44. Data were compared to a commercial ELISA-based BCa detection assay (BTA-Trak©) and voided urinary cytology. We used analysis of the area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic curves to compare the ability of CCL18, PAI-1, CD44, and BTA to detect BCa in voided urine samples. Urinary concentrations of CCL18, PAI-1, and BTA were significantly elevated in subjects with BCa. CCL18 was the most accurate biomarker (AUC; 0.919; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8704-0.9674). Multivariate regression analysis highlighted CCL18 (OR; 18.31; 95% CI, 4.95-67.70, p<0.0001) and BTA (OR; 6.43; 95% CI, 1.86-22.21, p = 0.0033) as independent predictors of BCa in voided urine samples. The combination of CCL18, PAI-1 and CD44 improved the area under the curve to0.938. Preliminary results indicate that CCL18 was a highly accurate biomarker for BCa detection in this cohort. Monitoring CCL18 in voided urine samples has the potential to improve non-invasive tests for BCa diagnosis. Furthermore using the combination of CCL18, PAI-1 and CD44 may make the model more robust to errors to detect BCa over the individual biomarkers or BTA.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037797
PMCID: PMC3357344  PMID: 22629457
4.  IL-8 as a urinary biomarker for the detection of bladder cancer 
BMC Urology  2012;12:12.
Background
Current urine-based assays for bladder cancer (BCa) diagnosis lack accuracy, so the search for improved biomarkers continues. Through genomic and proteomic profiling of urine, we have identified a panel of biomarkers associated with the presence of BCa. In this study, we evaluated the utility of three of these biomarkers, interleukin 8 (IL-8), Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and Syndecan in the diagnosis of BCa through urinalysis.
Methods
Voided urines from 127 subjects, cancer subjects (n = 64), non-cancer subjects (n = 63) were analyzed. The protein concentrations of IL-8, MMP-9, and Syndecan were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data were also compared to a commercial ELISA-based BCa detection assay (BTA-Trak©) and urinary cytology. We used the area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) to compare the performance of each biomarker.
Results
Urinary protein concentrations of IL-8, MMP-9 and BTA were significantly elevated in BCa subjects. Of the experimental markers compared to BTA-Trak©, IL-8 was the most prominent marker (AUC; 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.86). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that only IL-8 (OR; 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16-1.97, p = 0.002) was an independent factor for the detection of BCa.
Conclusions
These results suggest that the measurement of IL-8 in voided urinary samples may have utility for urine-based detection of BCa. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger, prospective cohort.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-12-12
PMCID: PMC3404900  PMID: 22559832
IL-8; Biomarkers; Diagnosis; Bladder cancer

Results 1-4 (4)