PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  The Histopathology of PRSS1 Hereditary Pancreatitis 
Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disorder with 80% penetrance and variable expressivity. The vast majority of cases have been linked to mutations within the cationic trypsinogen gene, also referred to as serine protease 1 (PRSS1). Other than inheritance, PRSS1 pancreatitis has been considered clinically and pathologically indistinguishable from other etiologies of chronic pancreatitis. However, to date, the histologic findings of PRSS1 pancreatitis have not been well described. We, therefore, collected pancreatic specimens from 10 PRSS1 patients of various ages and examined their clinicopathologic features. Patients at the time of resection ranged in age from 9 to 66 years (median, 29 y), with a slight female predominance (60%). All patients reported a history of intermittent abdominal pain, with an age of onset ranging from infancy to 21 years of age. Examination of the gross and microscopic findings suggested a sequential pattern of changes with increasing patient age. In pediatric patients (n=4), although in most cases the pancreas was grossly normal, there was microscopic variation in lobular size and shape. Although the central portions of the pancreas displayed parenchymal loss accompanied by loose perilobular and interlobular fibrosis, the periphery was remarkable for replacement by mature adipose tissue. These changes were more developed in younger adults (n=2), in whom fatty replacement seemed to extend from the periphery to the central portions of the pancreas. With older patients (n=4), the pancreas showed marked atrophy and extensive replacement by mature adipose tissue with scattered islets of Langerhans and rare acinar epithelium concentrated near the main pancreatic duct. In summary, PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis is characterized by progressive lipomatous atrophy of the pancreas.
doi:10.1097/PAS.0000000000000164
PMCID: PMC4321743  PMID: 24525505
PRSS1; hereditary pancreatitis; chronic pancreatitis; cationic trypsinogen; serine protease 1
2.  Immunohistochemical Staining of Slit2 in Primary and Metastatic Prostatic Adenocarcinoma1 
Translational Oncology  2011;4(5):314-320.
BACKGROUND: Conflicting roles for Slit2, a protein involved in mediating the processes of cell migration and chemotactic response, have been previously described in prostate cancer. Here we use immunohistochemistry to evaluate the expression of Slit2 in normal donor prostate (NDP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (NAC), primary prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma (Mets). METHODS: Tissue microarrays were immunostained for Slit2. The staining intensities were quantified using automated image analysis software. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance with subsequent Tukey tests for multiple comparisons or a nonparametric equivalent. Eleven cases of NDP, 35 cases of NAC, 15 cases of BPH, 35 cases of HGPIN, 106 cases of PCa, and 37 cases of Mets were analyzed. RESULTS: Specimens of PCa and HGPIN had the highest absolute staining for Slit2. Significant differences were seen between PCa and NDP (P < .05), PCa and NAC (P < .05), HGPIN and NDP (P < .05), and HGPIN and NAC (P < .05). Whereas the average Mets staining was not significantly different from NDP or NAC, several individual Mets cases featured intense staining. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this represents the first study comparing the immunohistochemical profiles of Slit2 in PCa and Mets to specimens of HGPIN, BPH, NDP, and NAC. These findings suggest that Slit2 expression can be increased in HGPIN, PCa, and Mets, making it a potentially important biomarker for prostate cancer.
PMCID: PMC3162306  PMID: 21966548
3.  Immunohistochemical analysis of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 in prostatic adenocarcinoma 
BMC Urology  2011;11:12.
Background
Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) is an adapter protein which has been shown to play an active role in a wide variety of cellular processes, including interactions with proteins related to both tumor suppression and oncogenesis. Here we use immunohistochemistry to evaluate EBP50's expression in normal donor prostate (NDP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (NAC), primary prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma (Mets).
Methods
Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for EBP50, with the staining intensities quantified using automated image analysis software. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA with subsequent Tukey tests for multiple comparisons. Eleven cases of NDP, 37 cases of NAC, 15 cases of BPH, 35 cases of HGPIN, 103 cases of PCa, and 36 cases of Mets were analyzed in the microarrays.
Results
Specimens of PCa and Mets had the lowest absolute staining for EBP50. Mets staining was significantly lower than NDP (p = 0.027), BPH (p = 0.012), NAC (p < 0.001), HGPIN (p < 0.001), and PCa (p = 0.006). Additionally, HGPIN staining was significantly higher than NAC (p < 0.009) and PCa (p < 0.001).
Conclusions
To our knowledge, this represents the first study comparing the immunohistochemical profiles of EBP50 in PCa and Mets to specimens of HGPIN, BPH, NDP, and NAC and suggests that EBP50 expression is decreased in Mets. Given that PCa also had significantly higher expression than Mets, future studies are warranted to assess EBP50's potential as a prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-11-12
PMCID: PMC3132203  PMID: 21672215
4.  Immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in primary and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma 
Diagnostic Pathology  2011;6:12.
Background
Claudins are integral membrane proteins that are involved in forming cellular tight junctions. One member of the claudin family, claudin-3, has been shown to be overexpressed in breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer. Here we use immunohistochemistry to evaluate its expression in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), normal tissue adjacent to prostatic adenocarcinoma (NAC), primary prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), and metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma (Mets).
Methods
Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for claudin-3, with the staining intensities subsequently quantified and statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA with subsequent Tukey tests for multiple comparisons or a nonparametric equivalent. Fifty-three cases of NAC, 17 cases of BPH, 35 cases of PIN, 107 cases of PCa, and 55 cases of Mets were analyzed in the microarrays.
Results
PCa and Mets had the highest absolute staining for claudin-3. Both had significantly higher staining than BPH (p < 0.05 in both cases) and NAC (p < 0.05 in both cases). PIN had a lower, but non-significant, staining score than PCa and Mets, but a statistically higher score than both BPH and NAC (p < 0.05 for both cases). No significant differences were observed between PCa, Mets, and PIN.
Conclusions
To our knowledge, this represents one of the first studies comparing the immunohistochemical profiles of claudin-3 in PCa and NAC to specimens of PIN, BPH, and Mets. These findings provide further evidence that claudin-3 may serve as an important biomarker for prostate cancer, both primary and metastatic, but does not provide evidence that claudin-3 can be used to predict risk of metastasis.
doi:10.1186/1746-1596-6-12
PMCID: PMC3033791  PMID: 21255442
5.  Immunohistochemical staining of radixin and moesin in prostatic adenocarcinoma 
Background
Some members of the Protein 4.1 superfamily are believed to be involved in cell proliferation and growth, or in the regulation of these processes. While the expression levels of two members of this family, radixin and moesin, have been studied in many tumor types, to our knowledge they have not been investigated in prostate cancer.
Methods
Tissue microarrays were immunohistochemically stained for either radixin or moesin, with the staining intensities subsequently quantified and statistically analyzed using One-Way ANOVA or nonparametric equivalent with subsequent Student-Newman-Keuls tests for multiple comparisons. There were 11 cases of normal donor prostates (NDP), 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 23 cases of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), 88 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa), and 25 cases of normal tissue adjacent to adenocarcinoma (NAC) analyzed in the microarrays.
Results
NDP, BPH, and HGPIN had higher absolute staining scores for radixin than PCa and NAC, but with a significant difference observed between only HGPIN and PCa (p = < 0.001) and HGPIN and NAC (p = 0.001). In the moesin-stained specimens, PCa, NAC, HGPIN, and BPH all received absolute higher staining scores than NDP, but the differences were not significant. Stage 4 moesin-stained PCa had a significantly reduced staining intensity compared to Stage 2 (p = 0.003).
Conclusions
To our knowledge, these studies represent the first reports on the expression profiles of radixin and moesin in prostatic adenocarcinoma. The current study has shown that there were statistically significant differences observed between HGPIN and PCa and HGPIN and NAC in terms of radixin expression. The differences in the moesin profiles by tissue type were not statistically significant. Additional larger studies with these markers may further elucidate their potential roles in prostatic neoplasia progression.
doi:10.1186/1472-6890-11-1
PMCID: PMC3029218  PMID: 21235778

Results 1-5 (5)