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author:("buschke, Marc")
1.  Impact of Diabetes and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease on the Functional Microcirculation at the Plantar Foot 
Plastic and reconstructive surgeons are commonly faced with chronic ulcerations and consecutive wound infections of the feet as complications in patients with diabetes and/or peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Microcirculatory changes seem to play an important role. However, the evaluation of functional changes in the soft tissue microcirculation at the plantar foot using combined Laser-Doppler and Photospectrometry System has not yet been performed in patients with DM or PAOD.
A prospective, controlled cohort study was designed consisting of a total of 107 subjects allocated to 1 of 3 groups—group A: healthy subjects (57% males, 63.3 y); group B: patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (53% males, 59.4 y); and group C: patients with PAOD (81% males, 66.1 y). Microcirculatory data were assessed using a combined Laser-Doppler and Photospectrometry System.
Global cutaneous oxygen saturation microcirculation at the plantar foot of healthy individuals was 8.4% higher than in patients with DM and 8.1% higher than in patients with PAOD (both P = 0.033). Patients with diabetes did not show significant differences in global cutaneous blood flow when compared with either healthy subjects or patients suffering from PAOD.
Functional microcirculation at the plantar foot differs between healthy subjects and patients suffering from diabetes or PAOD of the same age. Patients with either diabetes or PAOD demonstrate deteriorated cutaneous oxygen saturation with equivalent blood perfusion at the plantar foot. More clinical studies have to be conducted to evaluate therapeutical methods that might ameliorate cutaneous oxygen saturation within diabetic foot disease and PAOD.
PMCID: PMC4174050  PMID: 25289243
2.  Acute effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on cutaneous microcirculation - a controlled prospective cohort study 
BMC Surgery  2011;11:32.
Therapeutic strategies aiming to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury by conditioning tissue tolerance against ischemia appear attractive not only from a scientific perspective, but also in clinics. Although previous studies indicate that remote ischemic intermittent preconditioning (RIPC) is a systemic phenomenon, only a few studies have focused on the elucidation of its mechanisms of action especially in the clinical setting. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the acute microcirculatory effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on a distinct cutaneous location at the lower extremity which is typically used as a harvesting site for free flap reconstructive surgery in a human in-vivo setting.
Microcirculatory data of 27 healthy subjects (25 males, age 24 ± 4 years, BMI 23.3) were evaluated continuously at the anterolateral aspect of the left thigh during RIPC using combined Laser-Doppler and photospectrometry (Oxygen-to-see, Lea Medizintechnik, Germany). After baseline microcirculatory measurement, remote ischemia was induced using a tourniquet on the contralateral upper arm for three cycles of 5 min.
After RIPC, tissue oxygen saturation and capillary blood flow increased up to 29% and 35% during the third reperfusion phase versus baseline measurement, respectively (both p = 0.001). Postcapillary venous filling pressure decreased statistically significant by 16% during second reperfusion phase (p = 0.028).
Remote intermittent ischemic preconditioning affects cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation, arterial capillary blood flow and postcapillary venous filling pressure at a remote cutaneous location of the lower extremity. To what extent remote preconditioning might ameliorate reperfusion injury in soft tissue trauma or free flap transplantation further clinical trials have to evaluate.
Trial registration NCT01235286
PMCID: PMC3231986  PMID: 22111972
Remote ischemic preconditioning; cutaneous microcirculation; free flap; soft tissue
3.  Role of the complement components C5 and C3a in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury 
Objective: Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. The complement system plays a major role in inflammation and tissue injury following myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Systemic C5 inhibition in clinical studies has resulted in mixed results and the role of earlier complement components (e.g., C3a), upstream from C5 cleavage, has not been elucidated for MI/R injury. Therefore, we evaluated the role of C5 or C3a in a mouse model of MI/R injury.
Methods: We performed experimental MI/R with 30 min of ischemia and 4 hr of reperfusion in 8–12 wk old C57BL/6 (WT) mice. Systemic C5 or C3a inhibition was performed with an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody (BB5.1) 30 min prior to reperfusion or with a C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA). Since the C3aRA induces neutropenia that resolves within 120 min, we administered C3aRA at two different time points in two separate groups: 30 min prior to reperfusion within the neutropenic time frame and 120 min prior to reperfusion, when the neutropenia had resolved, but C3aRA remained active. Following MI/R, cardiac function was assessed via echocardiography, serum troponin I concentrations were measured as an index of myocardial cell death and myocardial inflammation was determined via myocardial polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration.
Results: In wild type mice, MI/R significantly decrease myocardial ejection fraction and increased serum troponin I levels and myocardial PMN infiltration compared to sham-operated animals. Systemic C5 inhibition, 30 min prior to reperfusion, significantly protected mice from MI/R injury, confirming an important role for C5 in murine MI/R injury.
Treatment with the C3aRA, 30 min prior to reperfusion (i.e., within the neutropenic time frame), protected mice significantly from MI/R related injury. In contrast, administration of the C3aRA 120 min prior to reperfusion, when the neutropenia had resolved, but C3aRA remained active, did not prevent MI/R injury.
Conclusions: These results confirm an important role for C5 cleavage in murine MI/R injury. At the same time, they suggest a minimal role for C3a, since neutropenia rather than C3a receptor antagonism appears to be responsible for C3aRA related amelioration in MI/R injury. While C5 inhibition in the clinical setting of MI/R does not appear to be therapeutic, our results raise the possibility that inhibition of either C5a or C5b-9 may be more advantageous than inhibition of C3a or complete inhibition of C5 in humans.
PMCID: PMC2940219  PMID: 20930931
ischemia; reperfusion; I/R; cardiac; myocardial; heart; ischemic heart disease; C5; C3a; complement

Results 1-3 (3)