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1.  Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer 
Alexandrov, Ludmil B. | Nik-Zainal, Serena | Wedge, David C. | Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R. | Behjati, Sam | Biankin, Andrew V. | Bignell, Graham R. | Bolli, Niccolo | Borg, Ake | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Boyault, Sandrine | Burkhardt, Birgit | Butler, Adam P. | Caldas, Carlos | Davies, Helen R. | Desmedt, Christine | Eils, Roland | Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla | Foekens, John A. | Greaves, Mel | Hosoda, Fumie | Hutter, Barbara | Ilicic, Tomislav | Imbeaud, Sandrine | Imielinsk, Marcin | Jäger, Natalie | Jones, David T.W. | Jones, David | Knappskog, Stian | Kool, Marcel | Lakhani, Sunil R. | López-Otín, Carlos | Martin, Sancha | Munshi, Nikhil C. | Nakamura, Hiromi | Northcott, Paul A. | Pajic, Marina | Papaemmanuil, Elli | Paradiso, Angelo | Pearson, John V. | Puente, Xose S. | Raine, Keiran | Ramakrishna, Manasa | Richardson, Andrea L. | Richter, Julia | Rosenstiel, Philip | Schlesner, Matthias | Schumacher, Ton N. | Span, Paul N. | Teague, Jon W. | Totoki, Yasushi | Tutt, Andrew N.J. | Valdés-Mas, Rafael | van Buuren, Marit M. | van ’t Veer, Laura | Vincent-Salomon, Anne | Waddell, Nicola | Yates, Lucy R. | Zucman-Rossi, Jessica | Futreal, P. Andrew | McDermott, Ultan | Lichter, Peter | Meyerson, Matthew | Grimmond, Sean M. | Siebert, Reiner | Campo, Elías | Shibata, Tatsuhiro | Pfister, Stefan M. | Campbell, Peter J. | Stratton, Michael R.
Nature  2013;500(7463):415-421.
All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy.
doi:10.1038/nature12477
PMCID: PMC3776390  PMID: 23945592
2.  Decision-Tree Based Model Analysis for Efficient Identification of Parameter Relations Leading to Different Signaling States 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(12):e82593.
In systems biology, a mathematical description of signal transduction processes is used to gain a more detailed mechanistic understanding of cellular signaling networks. Such models typically depend on a number of parameters that have different influence on the model behavior. Local sensitivity analysis is able to identify parameters that have the largest effect on signaling strength. Bifurcation analysis shows on which parameters a qualitative model response depends. Most methods for model analysis are intrinsically univariate. They typically cannot consider combinations of parameters since the search space for such analysis would be too large. This limitation is important since activation of a signaling pathway often relies on multiple rather than on single factors. Here, we present a novel method for model analysis that overcomes this limitation. As input to a model defined by a system of ordinary differential equations, we consider parameters for initial chemical species concentrations. The model is used to simulate the system response, which is then classified into pre-defined classes (e.g., active or not active). This is combined with a scan of the parameter space. Parameter sets leading to a certain system response are subjected to a decision tree algorithm, which learns conditions that lead to this response. We compare our method to two alternative multivariate approaches to model analysis: analytical solution for steady states combined with a parameter scan, and direct Lyapunov exponent (DLE) analysis. We use three previously published models including a model for EGF receptor internalization and two apoptosis models to demonstrate the power of our approach. Our method reproduces critical parameter relations previously obtained by both steady-state and DLE analysis while being more generally applicable and substantially less computationally expensive. The method can be used as a general tool to predict multivariate control strategies for pathway activation and to suggest strategies for drug intervention.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0082593
PMCID: PMC3867358  PMID: 24367526
3.  Genome sequencing: a systematic review of health economic evidence 
Recently the sequencing of the human genome has become a major biological and clinical research field. However, the public health impact of this new technology with focus on the financial effect is not yet to be foreseen. To provide an overview of the current health economic evidence for genome sequencing, we conducted a thorough systematic review of the literature from 17 databases. In addition, we conducted a hand search. Starting with 5 520 records we ultimately included five full-text publications and one internet source, all focused on cost calculations. The results were very heterogeneous and, therefore, difficult to compare. Furthermore, because the methodology of the publications was quite poor, the reliability and validity of the results were questionable. The real costs for the whole sequencing workflow, including data management and analysis, remain unknown. Overall, our review indicates that the current health economic evidence for genome sequencing is quite poor. Therefore, we listed aspects that needed to be considered when conducting health economic analyses of genome sequencing. Thereby, specifics regarding the overall aim, technology, population, indication, comparator, alternatives after sequencing, outcomes, probabilities, and costs with respect to genome sequencing are discussed. For further research, at the outset, a comprehensive cost calculation of genome sequencing is needed, because all further health economic studies rely on valid cost data. The results will serve as an input parameter for budget-impact analyses or cost-effectiveness analyses.
doi:10.1186/2191-1991-3-29
PMCID: PMC3874598  PMID: 24330507
Genome; Sequencing; Health economics; Cost analysis
4.  Hypermutation of the Inactive X Chromosome Is a Frequent Event in Cancer 
Cell  2013;155(3):567-581.
Summary
Mutation is a fundamental process in tumorigenesis. However, the degree to which the rate of somatic mutation varies across the human genome and the mechanistic basis underlying this variation remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we performed a cross-cancer comparison of 402 whole genomes comprising a diverse set of childhood and adult tumors, including both solid and hematopoietic malignancies. Surprisingly, we found that the inactive X chromosome of many female cancer genomes accumulates on average twice and up to four times as many somatic mutations per megabase, as compared to the individual autosomes. Whole-genome sequencing of clonally expanded hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy individuals and a premalignant myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) sample revealed no X chromosome hypermutation. Our data suggest that hypermutation of the inactive X chromosome is an early and frequent feature of tumorigenesis resulting from DNA replication stress in aberrantly proliferating cells.
Graphical Abstract
Highlights
•X chromosome has up to 4× more mutations than the autosomes in female cancer genomes•Hypermutations only affect the inactive X chromosome•X hypermutation involves somatic point mutations and indels, but not germline mutations•No X hypermutation is found in clonal expansions of normal or premalignant cells
A comparison of 402 cancer genomes identifies a surprisingly high level of somatic mutations in the inactive X chromosome of female cancer genomes. As hypermutability of the inactive X was not observed in clonal hematopoietic progenitor or preleukemic samples, it is likely that it may be a contributing factor to tumorigenesis.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.042
PMCID: PMC3898475  PMID: 24139898
5.  Live cell assays to identify regulators of ER to Golgi trafficking 
Traffic (Copenhagen, Denmark)  2012;13(3):416-432.
We applied fluorescence microscopy based quantitative assays to living cells to identify regulators of ER to Golgi trafficking and/or Golgi complex maintenance. We first validated an automated procedure to identify factors, which influence Golgi to ER re-localization of GalT-CFP after brefeldin A (BFA) addition and/or wash-out. We then tested 14 proteins that localize to the ER and/or Golgi complex when over-expressed for a role in ER to Golgi trafficking. Nine of them interfered with the rate of BFA induced redistribution of GalT-CFP from the Golgi complex to the ER, 6 of them interfered with GalT-CFP redistribution from the ER to a juxtanuclear region (i.e., Golgi complex) after BFA wash-out, and 6 of them were positive effectors in both assays. Notably, our live cell approach captures regulator function in ER to Golgi trafficking, that were missed in previous fixed cell assays; as well as assigns putative roles for other less characterized proteins. Moreover, we show that our assays can be extended to RNAi and chemical screens.
doi:10.1111/j.1600-0854.2011.01318.x
PMCID: PMC3711101  PMID: 22132776
Brefeldin A (BFA); GalT; ER to Golgi trafficking; YIPF; GOT1B; USE1; SACM1L
6.  Coverage Bias and Sensitivity of Variant Calling for Four Whole-genome Sequencing Technologies 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(6):e66621.
The emergence of high-throughput, next-generation sequencing technologies has dramatically altered the way we assess genomes in population genetics and in cancer genomics. Currently, there are four commonly used whole-genome sequencing platforms on the market: Illumina’s HiSeq2000, Life Technologies’ SOLiD 4 and its completely redesigned 5500xl SOLiD, and Complete Genomics’ technology. A number of earlier studies have compared a subset of those sequencing platforms or compared those platforms with Sanger sequencing, which is prohibitively expensive for whole genome studies. Here we present a detailed comparison of the performance of all currently available whole genome sequencing platforms, especially regarding their ability to call SNVs and to evenly cover the genome and specific genomic regions. Unlike earlier studies, we base our comparison on four different samples, allowing us to assess the between-sample variation of the platforms. We find a pronounced GC bias in GC-rich regions for Life Technologies’ platforms, with Complete Genomics performing best here, while we see the least bias in GC-poor regions for HiSeq2000 and 5500xl. HiSeq2000 gives the most uniform coverage and displays the least sample-to-sample variation. In contrast, Complete Genomics exhibits by far the smallest fraction of bases not covered, while the SOLiD platforms reveal remarkable shortcomings, especially in covering CpG islands. When comparing the performance of the four platforms for calling SNPs, HiSeq2000 and Complete Genomics achieve the highest sensitivity, while the SOLiD platforms show the lowest false positive rate. Finally, we find that integrating sequencing data from different platforms offers the potential to combine the strengths of different technologies. In summary, our results detail the strengths and weaknesses of all four whole-genome sequencing platforms. It indicates application areas that call for a specific sequencing platform and disallow other platforms. This helps to identify the proper sequencing platform for whole genome studies with different application scopes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066621
PMCID: PMC3679043  PMID: 23776689
7.  Genome Sequencing of Pediatric Medulloblastoma Links Catastrophic DNA Rearrangements with TP53 Mutations 
Cell  2012;148(1-2):59-71.
SUMMARY
Genomic rearrangements are thought to occur progressively during tumor development. Recent findings, however, suggest an alternative mechanism, involving massive chromosome rearrangements in a one-step catastrophic event termed chromothripsis. We report the whole-genome sequencing-based analysis of a Sonic-Hedgehog medulloblastoma (SHH-MB) brain tumor from a patient with a germline TP53 mutation (Li-Fraumeni syndrome), uncovering massive, complex chromosome rearrangements. Integrating TP53 status with microarray and deep sequencing-based DNA rearrangement data in additional patients reveals a striking association between TP53 mutation and chromothripsis in SHH-MBs. Analysis of additional tumor entities substantiates a link between TP53 mutation and chromothripsis, and indicates a context-specific role for p53 in catastrophic DNA rearrangements. Among these, we observed a strong association between somatic TP53 mutations and chromothripsis in acute myeloid leukemia. These findings connect p53 status and chromothripsis in specific tumor types, providing a genetic basis for understanding particularly aggressive subtypes of cancer.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2011.12.013
PMCID: PMC3332216  PMID: 22265402
8.  miR-17-5p Regulates Endocytic Trafficking through Targeting TBC1D2/Armus 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(12):e52555.
miRNA cluster miR-17-92 is known as oncomir-1 due to its potent oncogenic function. miR-17-92 is a polycistronic cluster that encodes 6 miRNAs, and can both facilitate and inhibit cell proliferation. Known targets of miRNAs encoded by this cluster are largely regulators of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Here, we show that miRNAs encoded by this cluster and sharing the seed sequence of miR-17 exert their influence on one of the most essential cellular processes – endocytic trafficking. By mRNA expression analysis we identified that regulation of endocytic trafficking by miR-17 can potentially be achieved by targeting of a number of trafficking regulators. We have thoroughly validated TBC1D2/Armus, a GAP of Rab7 GTPase, as a novel target of miR-17. Our study reveals regulation of endocytic trafficking as a novel function of miR-17, which might act cooperatively with other functions of miR-17 and related miRNAs in health and disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0052555
PMCID: PMC3527550  PMID: 23285084
9.  Time-Lapse Imaging of Neuroblastoma Cells to Determine Cell Fate upon Gene Knockdown 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(12):e50988.
Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Standard therapies are not effective in case of poor prognosis and chemotherapy resistance. To improve drug therapy, it is imperative to discover new targets that play a substantial role in tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma. The mitotic machinery is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions and inhibitors can be developed to target mitotic entry, spindle apparatus, spindle activation checkpoint, and mitotic exit. We present an elaborate analysis pipeline to determine cancer specific therapeutic targets by first performing a focused gene expression analysis to select genes followed by a gene knockdown screening assay of live cells. We interrogated gene expression studies of neuroblastoma tumors and selected 240 genes relevant for tumorigenesis and cell cycle. With these genes we performed time-lapse screening of gene knockdowns in neuroblastoma cells. We classified cellular phenotypes and used the temporal context of the perturbation effect to determine the sequence of events, particularly the mitotic entry preceding cell death. Based upon this phenotype kinetics from the gene knockdown screening, we inferred dynamic gene functions in mitosis and cell proliferation. We identified six genes (DLGAP5, DSCC1, SMO, SNRPD1, SSBP1, and UBE2C) with a vital role in mitosis and these are promising therapeutic targets for neuroblastoma. Images and movies of every time point of all screened genes are available at https://ichip.bioquant.uni-heidelberg.de.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050988
PMCID: PMC3521006  PMID: 23251412
11.  Recruitment and activation of a lipid kinase by hepatitis C virus NS5A is essential for integrity of the membranous replication compartment 
Cell host & microbe  2011;9(1):32-45.
SUMMARY
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major causative agent of chronic liver disease in humans. To gain insight into host factor requirements for HCV replication we performed a siRNA screen of the human kinome and identified 13 different kinases, including phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) as required for HCV replication. Consistent with elevated levels of the PI4KIIIα product phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) detected in HCV infected cultured hepatocytes and liver tissue from chronic hepatitis C patients, the enzymatic activity of PI4KIIIα was critical for HCV replication. Viral nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) was found to interact with PI4KIIIα and stimulate its kinase activity. The absence of PI4KIIIα activity induced a dramatic change in the ultrastructural morphology of the membranous HCV replication complex. Our analysis suggests that the direct activation of a lipid kinase by HCV NS5A contributes critically to the integrity of the membranous viral replication complex.
doi:10.1016/j.chom.2010.12.002
PMCID: PMC3433060  PMID: 21238945
12.  Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion 
The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed.
doi:10.1109/TIP.2010.2076377
PMCID: PMC3282047  PMID: 20840894
Biomedical image processing; image sequence analysis; microscopy; registration
13.  Multi-Parametric Analysis and Modeling of Relationships between Mitochondrial Morphology and Apoptosis 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(1):e28694.
Mitochondria exist as a network of interconnected organelles undergoing constant fission and fusion. Current approaches to study mitochondrial morphology are limited by low data sampling coupled with manual identification and classification of complex morphological phenotypes. Here we propose an integrated mechanistic and data-driven modeling approach to analyze heterogeneous, quantified datasets and infer relations between mitochondrial morphology and apoptotic events. We initially performed high-content, multi-parametric measurements of mitochondrial morphological, apoptotic, and energetic states by high-resolution imaging of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells. Subsequently, decision tree-based analysis was used to automatically classify networked, fragmented, and swollen mitochondrial subpopulations, at the single-cell level and within cell populations. Our results revealed subtle but significant differences in morphology class distributions in response to various apoptotic stimuli. Furthermore, key mitochondrial functional parameters including mitochondrial membrane potential and Bax activation, were measured under matched conditions. Data-driven fuzzy logic modeling was used to explore the non-linear relationships between mitochondrial morphology and apoptotic signaling, combining morphological and functional data as a single model. Modeling results are in accordance with previous studies, where Bax regulates mitochondrial fragmentation, and mitochondrial morphology influences mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, we established and validated a platform for mitochondrial morphological and functional analysis that can be readily extended with additional datasets. We further discuss the benefits of a flexible systematic approach for elucidating specific and general relationships between mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028694
PMCID: PMC3260148  PMID: 22272225
14.  Normalizing for individual cell population context in the analysis of high-content cellular screens 
BMC Bioinformatics  2011;12:485.
Background
High-content, high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) offers unprecedented possibilities to elucidate gene function and involvement in biological processes. Microscopy based screening allows phenotypic observations at the level of individual cells. It was recently shown that a cell's population context significantly influences results. However, standard analysis methods for cellular screens do not currently take individual cell data into account unless this is important for the phenotype of interest, i.e. when studying cell morphology.
Results
We present a method that normalizes and statistically scores microscopy based RNAi screens, exploiting individual cell information of hundreds of cells per knockdown. Each cell's individual population context is employed in normalization. We present results on two infection screens for hepatitis C and dengue virus, both showing considerable effects on observed phenotypes due to population context. In addition, we show on a non-virus screen that these effects can be found also in RNAi data in the absence of any virus. Using our approach to normalize against these effects we achieve improved performance in comparison to an analysis without this normalization and hit scoring strategy. Furthermore, our approach results in the identification of considerably more significantly enriched pathways in hepatitis C virus replication than using a standard analysis approach.
Conclusions
Using a cell-based analysis and normalization for population context, we achieve improved sensitivity and specificity not only on a individual protein level, but especially also on a pathway level. This leads to the identification of new host dependency factors of the hepatitis C and dengue viruses and higher reproducibility of results.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-485
PMCID: PMC3259109  PMID: 22185194
15.  Autoantibodies against the exocrine pancreas in autoimmune pancreatitis: gene and protein expression profiling and immunoassays identify pancreatic enzymes as a major target of the inflammatory process 
Objectives
Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is thought to be an immune-mediated inflammatory process, directed against the epithelial components of the pancreas.
Methods
In order to explore key targets of the inflammatory process we analysed the expression of proteins at the RNA and protein level using genomics and proteomics, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and immunoassay. An animal model of AIP with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus infected mice was studied in parallel. RNA microarrays of pancreatic tissue from 12 patients with AIP were compared to those of 8 patients with non-AIP chronic pancreatitis (CP).
Results
Expression profiling revealed 272 upregulated genes, including those encoding for immunoglobulins, chemokines and their receptors, and 86 downregulated genes, including those for pancreatic proteases such as three trypsinogen isoforms. Protein profiling showed that the expression of trypsinogens and other pancreatic enzymes was greatly reduced. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a near-loss of trypsin positive acinar cells, which was also confirmed by Western blotting. The serum of AIP patients contained high titres of autoantibodies against the trypsinogens PRSS1, and PRSS2 but not against PRSS3. In addition, there were autoantibodies against the trypsin inhibitor PSTI (the product of the SPINK1 gene). In the pancreas of AIP animals we found similar protein patterns and a reduction in trypsinogen.
Conclusion
These data indicate that the immune-mediated process characterizing AIP involves pancreatic acinar cells and their secretory enzymes such as trypsin isoforms. Demonstration of trypsinogen autoantibodies may be helpful for the diagnosis of AIP.
doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.141
PMCID: PMC3099227  PMID: 20407433
autoimmune pancreatitis; chronic pancreatitis; trypsinogen; proteomics; transcriptomics; autoantibody
16.  Enhancers regulate progression of development in mammalian cells 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;39(20):8689-8702.
During development and differentiation of an organism, accurate gene regulation is central for cells to maintain and balance their differentiation processes. Transcriptional interactions between cis-acting DNA elements such as promoters and enhancers are the basis for precise and balanced transcriptional regulation. We identified modules of combinations of binding sites in proximal and distal regulatory regions upstream of all transcription start sites (TSSs) in silico and applied these modules to gene expression time-series of mouse embryonic development and differentiation of human stem cells. In addition to tissue-specific regulation controlled by combinations of transcription factors (TFs) binding at promoters, we observed that in particular the combination of TFs binding at promoters together with TFs binding at the respective enhancers regulate highly specifically temporal progression during development: whereas 40% of TFs were specific for time intervals, 79% of TF pairs and even 97% of promoter–enhancer modules showed specificity for single time intervals of the human stem cells. Predominantly SP1 and E2F contributed to temporal specificity at promoters and the forkhead (FOX) family of TFs at enhancer regions. Altogether, we characterized three classes of TFs: with binding sites being enriched at the TSS (like SP1), depleted at the TSS (like FOX), and rather uniformly distributed.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr602
PMCID: PMC3203619  PMID: 21785139
17.  Formulating multicellular models of metabolism in tissues: application to energy metabolism in the human brain 
Nature biotechnology  2010;28(12):1279-1285.
A workflow is presented that integrates gene expression data, proteomic data, and literature-based manual curation to construct multicellular, tissue-specific models of human brain energy metabolism that recapitulate metabolic interactions between astrocytes and various neuron types. Three analyses are applied for gene identification, analysis of omics data, and analysis of physiological states. First, we identify glutamate decarboxylase as a target that may contribute to cell-type and regional specificity in Alzheimer’s disease. Second, the decreased metabolic rate seen in affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease is consistent with a suppression of central metabolic gene expression in histopathologically normal neurons. Third, we identify pathways in cholinergic neurons that couple mitochondrial metabolism and cytosolic acetylcholine production, and subsequently find that cholinergic neurotransmission accounts for ∼3% of brain neurotransmission. Constraint-based modeling can thus contribute to the study and analysis of multicellular metabolic processes in human tissues, and provide detailed mechanistic insight into high-throughput data analysis.
doi:10.1038/nbt.1711
PMCID: PMC3140076  PMID: 21102456
18.  Phenotypic profiling of the human genome by time-lapse microscopy reveals cell division genes 
Nature  2010;464(7289):721-727.
Despite our rapidly growing knowledge about the human genome, we do not know all of the genes required for some of the most basic functions of life. To start to fill this gap we developed a high-throughput phenotypic screening platform combining potent gene silencing by RNA interference, time-lapse microscopy and computational image processing. We carried out a genome-wide phenotypic profiling of each of the ~21,000 human protein-coding genes by two-day live imaging of fluorescently labelled chromosomes. Phenotypes were scored quantitatively by computational image processing, which allowed us to identify hundreds of human genes involved in diverse biological functions including cell division, migration and survival. As part of the Mitocheck consortium, this study provides an in-depth analysis of cell division phenotypes and makes the entire high-content data set available as a resource to the community.
doi:10.1038/nature08869
PMCID: PMC3108885  PMID: 20360735
19.  Concurrent detection of autolysosome formation and lysosomal degradation by flow cytometry in a high-content screen for inducers of autophagy 
BMC Biology  2011;9:38.
Background
Autophagy mediates lysosomal degradation of cytosolic components. Recent work has associated autophagic dysfunction with pathologies, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. To date, the identification of clinically-applicable drugs that modulate autophagy has been hampered by the lack of standardized assays capable of precisely reporting autophagic activity.
Results
We developed and implemented a high-content, flow-cytometry-based screening approach for rapid, precise, and quantitative measurements of pharmaceutical control over autophagy. Our assay allowed for time-resolved individual measurements of autolysosome formation and degradation, and endolysosomal activities under both basal and activated autophagy conditions. As proof of concept, we analyzed conventional autophagy regulators, including cardioprotective compounds aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR), rapamycin, and resveratrol, and revealed striking conditional dependencies of rapamycin and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). To identify novel autophagy modulators with translational potential, we screened the Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,120 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for impact on autolysosome formation. In all, 38 compounds were identified as potential activators, and 36 as potential inhibitors of autophagy. Notably, amongst the autophagy enhancers were cardiac glycosides, from which we selected digoxin, strophanthidin, and digoxigenin for validation by standard biochemical and imaging techniques. We report the induction of autophagic flux by these cardiac glycosides, and the concentrations allowing for specific enhancement of autophagic activities without impact on endolysosomal activities.
Conclusions
Our systematic analysis of autophagic and endolysosomal activities outperformed conventional autophagy assays and highlights the complexity of drug influence on autophagy. We demonstrate conditional dependencies of established regulators. Moreover, we identified new autophagy regulators and characterized cardiac glycosides as novel potent inducers of autophagic flux.
doi:10.1186/1741-7007-9-38
PMCID: PMC3121655  PMID: 21635740
20.  Comparative transcriptome profiling of amyloid precursor protein family members in the adult cortex 
BMC Genomics  2011;12:160.
Background
The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the related β-amyloid precursor-like proteins (APLPs) undergo complex proteolytic processing giving rise to several fragments. Whereas it is well established that Aβ accumulation is a central trigger for Alzheimer's disease, the physiological role of APP family members and their diverse proteolytic products is still largely unknown. The secreted APPsα ectodomain has been shown to be involved in neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. The γ-secretase-generated APP intracellular domain (AICD) functions as a transcriptional regulator in heterologous reporter assays although its role for endogenous gene regulation has remained controversial.
Results
To gain further insight into the molecular changes associated with knockout phenotypes and to elucidate the physiological functions of APP family members including their proposed role as transcriptional regulators, we performed DNA microarray transcriptome profiling of prefrontal cortex of adult wild-type (WT), APP knockout (APP-/-), APLP2 knockout (APLP2-/-) and APPsα knockin mice (APPα/α) expressing solely the secreted APPsα ectodomain. Biological pathways affected by the lack of APP family members included neurogenesis, transcription, and kinase activity. Comparative analysis of transcriptome changes between mutant and wild-type mice, followed by qPCR validation, identified co-regulated gene sets. Interestingly, these included heat shock proteins and plasticity-related genes that were both down-regulated in knockout cortices. In contrast, we failed to detect significant differences in expression of previously proposed AICD target genes including Bace1, Kai1, Gsk3b, p53, Tip60, and Vglut2. Only Egfr was slightly up-regulated in APLP2-/- mice. Comparison of APP-/- and APPα/α with wild-type mice revealed a high proportion of co-regulated genes indicating an important role of the C-terminus for cellular signaling. Finally, comparison of APLP2-/- on different genetic backgrounds revealed that background-related transcriptome changes may dominate over changes due to the knockout of a single gene.
Conclusion
Shared transcriptome profiles corroborated closely related physiological functions of APP family members in the adult central nervous system. As expression of proposed AICD target genes was not altered in adult cortex, this may indicate that these genes are not affected by lack of APP under resting conditions or only in a small subset of cells.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-12-160
PMCID: PMC3080314  PMID: 21435241
21.  Model-based dissection of CD95 signaling dynamics reveals both a pro- and antiapoptotic role of c-FLIPL 
The Journal of Cell Biology  2010;190(3):377-389.
A systems biology–based approach shows that life and death decisions for cells depend on the stoichiometry of c-FLIP isoforms.
Cellular FADD-like interleukin-1β–converting enzyme inhibitory proteins (c-FLIPs; isoforms c-FLIP long [c-FLIPL], c-FLIP short [c-FLIPS], and c-FLIP Raji [c-FLIPR]) regulate caspase-8 activation and death receptor (DR)–induced apoptosis. In this study, using a combination of mathematical modeling, imaging, and quantitative Western blots, we present a new mathematical model describing caspase-8 activation in quantitative terms, which highlights the influence of c-FLIP proteins on this process directly at the CD95 death-inducing signaling complex. We quantitatively define how the stoichiometry of c-FLIP proteins determines sensitivity toward CD95-induced apoptosis. We show that c-FLIPL has a proapoptotic role only upon moderate expression in combination with strong receptor stimulation or in the presence of high amounts of one of the short c-FLIP isoforms, c-FLIPS or c-FLIPR. Our findings resolve the present controversial discussion on the function of c-FLIPL as a pro- or antiapoptotic protein in DR-mediated apoptosis and are important for understanding the regulation of CD95-induced apoptosis, where subtle differences in c-FLIP concentrations determine life or death of the cells.
doi:10.1083/jcb.201002060
PMCID: PMC2922645  PMID: 20696707
22.  Phenocopy – A Strategy to Qualify Chemical Compounds during Hit-to-Lead and/or Lead Optimization 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(12):e14272.
A phenocopy is defined as an environmentally induced phenotype of one individual which is identical to the genotype-determined phenotype of another individual. The phenocopy phenomenon has been translated to the drug discovery process as phenotypes produced by the treatment of biological systems with new chemical entities (NCE) may resemble environmentally induced phenotypic modifications. Various new chemical entities exerting inhibition of the kinase activity of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor I (TGF-βR1) were qualified by high-throughput RNA expression profiling. This chemical genomics approach resulted in a precise time-dependent insight to the TGF-β biology and allowed furthermore a comprehensive analysis of each NCE's off-target effects. The evaluation of off-target effects by the phenocopy approach allows a more accurate and integrated view on optimized compounds, supplementing classical biological evaluation parameters such as potency and selectivity. It has therefore the potential to become a novel method for ranking compounds during various drug discovery phases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014272
PMCID: PMC3000806  PMID: 21170314
23.  Identification of the Rage-dependent gene regulatory network in a mouse model of skin inflammation 
BMC Genomics  2010;11:537.
Background
In the past, molecular mechanisms that drive the initiation of an inflammatory response have been studied intensively. However, corresponding mechanisms that sustain the expression of inflammatory response genes and hence contribute to the establishment of chronic disorders remain poorly understood. Recently, we provided genetic evidence that signaling via the receptor for advanced glycation end products (Rage) drives the strength and maintenance of an inflammatory reaction. In order to decipher the mode of Rage function on gene transcription levels during inflammation, we applied global gene expression profiling on time-resolved samples of mouse back skin, which had been treated with the phorbol ester TPA, a potent inducer of skin inflammation.
Results
Ranking of TPA-regulated genes according to their time average mean and peak expression and superimposition of data sets from wild-type (wt) and Rage-deficient mice revealed that Rage signaling is not essential for initial changes in TPA-induced transcription, but absolutely required for sustained alterations in transcript levels. Next, we used a data set of differentially expressed genes between TPA-treated wt and Rage-deficient skin and performed computational analysis of their proximal promoter regions. We found a highly significant enrichment for several transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) leading to the prediction that corresponding transcription factors, such as Sp1, Tcfap2, E2f, Myc and Egr, are regulated by Rage signaling. Accordingly, we could confirm aberrant expression and regulation of members of the E2f protein family in epidermal keratinocytes of Rage-deficient mice.
Conclusions
In summary, our data support the model that engagement of Rage converts a transient cellular stimulation into sustained cellular dysfunction and highlight a novel role of the Rb-E2f pathway in Rage-dependent inflammation during pathological conditions.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-11-537
PMCID: PMC3091686  PMID: 20923549
24.  Analyzing the regulation of metabolic pathways in human breast cancer 
BMC Medical Genomics  2010;3:39.
Background
Tumor therapy mainly attacks the metabolism to interfere the tumor's anabolism and signaling of proliferative second messengers. However, the metabolic demands of different cancers are very heterogeneous and depend on their origin of tissue, age, gender and other clinical parameters. We investigated tumor specific regulation in the metabolism of breast cancer.
Methods
For this, we mapped gene expression data from microarrays onto the corresponding enzymes and their metabolic reaction network. We used Haar Wavelet transforms on optimally arranged grid representations of metabolic pathways as a pattern recognition method to detect orchestrated regulation of neighboring enzymes in the network. Significant combined expression patterns were used to select metabolic pathways showing shifted regulation of the aggressive tumors.
Results
Besides up-regulation for energy production and nucleotide anabolism, we found an interesting cellular switch in the interplay of biosynthesis of steroids and bile acids. The biosynthesis of steroids was up-regulated for estrogen synthesis which is needed for proliferative signaling in breast cancer. In turn, the decomposition of steroid precursors was blocked by down-regulation of the bile acid pathway.
Conclusion
We applied an intelligent pattern recognition method for analyzing the regulation of metabolism and elucidated substantial regulation of human breast cancer at the interplay of cholesterol biosynthesis and bile acid metabolism pointing to specific breast cancer treatment.
doi:10.1186/1755-8794-3-39
PMCID: PMC2945993  PMID: 20831783
25.  Detecting host factors involved in virus infection by observing the clustering of infected cells in siRNA screening images 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(18):i653-i658.
Motivation: Detecting human proteins that are involved in virus entry and replication is facilitated by modern high-throughput RNAi screening technology. However, hit lists from different laboratories have shown only little consistency. This may be caused by not only experimental discrepancies, but also not fully explored possibilities of the data analysis. We wanted to improve reliability of such screens by combining a population analysis of infected cells with an established dye intensity readout.
Results: Viral infection is mainly spread by cell–cell contacts and clustering of infected cells can be observed during spreading of the infection in situ and in vivo. We employed this clustering feature to define knockdowns which harm viral infection efficiency of human Hepatitis C Virus. Images of knocked down cells for 719 human kinase genes were analyzed with an established point pattern analysis method (Ripley's K-function) to detect knockdowns in which virally infected cells did not show any clustering and therefore were hindered to spread their infection to their neighboring cells. The results were compared with a statistical analysis using a common intensity readout of the GFP-expressing viruses and a luciferase-based secondary screen yielding five promising host factors which may suit as potential targets for drug therapy.
Conclusion: We report of an alternative method for high-throughput imaging methods to detect host factors being relevant for the infection efficiency of viruses. The method is generic and has the potential to be used for a large variety of different viruses and treatments being screened by imaging techniques.
Contact: r.eils@dkfz.de; r.koenig@dkfz.de
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq398
PMCID: PMC2935410  PMID: 20823335

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