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1.  RAGE Regulates the Metabolic and Inflammatory Response to High-Fat Feeding in Mice 
Diabetes  2014;63(6):1948-1965.
In mammals, changes in the metabolic state, including obesity, fasting, cold challenge, and high-fat diets (HFDs), activate complex immune responses. In many strains of rodents, HFDs induce a rapid systemic inflammatory response and lead to obesity. Little is known about the molecular signals required for HFD-induced phenotypes. We studied the function of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the development of phenotypes associated with high-fat feeding in mice. RAGE is highly expressed on immune cells, including macrophages. We found that high-fat feeding induced expression of RAGE ligand HMGB1 and carboxymethyllysine-advanced glycation end product epitopes in liver and adipose tissue. Genetic deficiency of RAGE prevented the effects of HFD on energy expenditure, weight gain, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. RAGE deficiency had no effect on genetic forms of obesity caused by impaired melanocortin signaling. Hematopoietic deficiency of RAGE or treatment with soluble RAGE partially protected against peripheral HFD-induced inflammation and weight gain. These findings demonstrate that high-fat feeding induces peripheral inflammation and weight gain in a RAGE-dependent manner, providing a foothold in the pathways that regulate diet-induced obesity and offering the potential for therapeutic intervention.
doi:10.2337/db13-1636
PMCID: PMC4030112  PMID: 24520121
2.  Obesity-associated insulin resistance is correlated to adipose tissue vascular endothelial growth factors and metalloproteinase levels 
BMC Physiology  2012;12:4.
Background
The expansion of adipose tissue is linked to the development of its vasculature, which appears to have the potential to regulate the onset of obesity. However, at present, there are no studies highlighting the relationship between human adipose tissue angiogenesis and obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR).
Results
Our aim was to analyze and compare angiogenic factor expression levels in both subcutaneous (SC) and omentum (OM) adipose tissues from morbidly obese patients (n = 26) with low (OB/L-IR) (healthy obese) and high (OB/H-IR) degrees of IR, and lean controls (n = 17). Another objective was to examine angiogenic factor correlations with obesity and IR.
Here we found that VEGF-A was the isoform with higher expression in both OM and SC adipose tissues, and was up-regulated 3-fold, together with MMP9 in OB/L-IR as compared to leans. This up-regulation decreased by 23% in OB/-H-IR compared to OB/L-IR. On the contrary, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with MMP15 was down-regulated in both OB/H-IR and OB/L-IR compared to lean patients. Moreover, MMP9 correlated positively and VEGF-C, VEGF-D and MMP15 correlated negatively with HOMA-IR, in both SC and OM.
Conclusion
We hereby propose that the alteration in MMP15, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D gene expression may be caused by one of the relevant adipose tissue processes related to the development of IR, and the up-regulation of VEGF-A in adipose tissue could have a relationship with the prevention of this pathology.
doi:10.1186/1472-6793-12-4
PMCID: PMC3382430  PMID: 22471305
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Metalloproteinase; Obesity; Insulin Resistance; Omentum Adipose Tissue; Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

Results 1-2 (2)