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1.  Impact of mannose-binding lectin deficiency on radiocontrast-induced renal dysfunction: a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter randomized controlled trial 
BMC Nephrology  2012;13:99.
Background
Local renal ischemia is regarded as an important factor in the development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is involved in the tissue damage during experimental ischemia/reperfusion injury of the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of MBL deficiency with radiocontrast-induced renal dysfunction in a large prospective cohort.
Methods
246 patients with advanced non–dialysis-dependent renal dysfunction who underwent radiographic contrast procedures were included in the study. Baseline serum MBL levels were analyzed according to the occurrence of a creatinine-based (increase of ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% within 48 hours) or cystatin C-based (increase of ≥10% within 24 hours) CIN.
Results
The incidence of creatinine-based and cystatin C-based CIN was 6.5% and 24%, respectively. MBL levels were not associated with the occurrence of creatinine-based CIN. However, patients that experienced a cystatin C increase of ≥10% showed significantly higher MBL levels than patients with a rise of <10% (median 2885 (IQR 1193–4471) vs. 1997 (IQR 439–3504)ng/mL, p = 0.01). In logistic regression analysis MBL deficiency (MBL levels≤500 ng/ml) was identified as an inverse predictor of a cystatin C increase ≥10% (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.8, p = 0.01).
Conclusion
MBL deficiency was associated with a reduced radiocontrast-induced renal dysfunction as reflected by the course of cystatin C. Our findings support a possible role of MBL in the pathogenesis of CIN.
doi:10.1186/1471-2369-13-99
PMCID: PMC3471006  PMID: 22938690
Complement; Mannose-binding lectin; Contrast-induced nephropathy; Ischemia/reperfusion injury; Acute kidney injury
2.  Lung Function and Breathing Pattern in Subjects Developing High Altitude Pulmonary Edema 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(7):e41188.
Introduction
The purpose of the study was to comprehensively evaluate physiologic changes associated with development of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). We tested whether changes in pulmonary function and breathing pattern would herald clinically overt HAPE at an early stage.
Methods
In 18 mountaineers, spirometry, diffusing capacity, nitrogen washout, nocturnal ventilation and pulse oximetry were recorded at 490 m and during 3 days after rapid ascent to 4559 m. Findings were compared among subjects developing HAPE and those remaining well (controls).
Results
In 8 subjects subsequently developing radiographically documented HAPE at 4559 m, median FVC declined to 82% of low altitude baseline while closing volume increased to 164% of baseline (P<0.05, both instances). In 10 controls, FVC decreased slightly (to 93% baseline, P<0.05) but significantly less than in subjects with HAPE and closing volume remained unchanged. Sniff nasal pressure was reduced in both subjects with and without subsequent HAPE. During nights at 4559 m, mean nocturnal oxygen saturation dropped to lower values while minute ventilation, the number of periodic breathing cycles and heart rate were higher (60%; 8.6 L/min; 97 cycles/h; 94 beats/min, respectively) in subjects subsequently developing HAPE than in controls (73%; 5.1 L/min; 48 cycles/h; 79 beats/min; P<0.05 vs. HAPE, all instances).
Conclusion
The results comprehensively represent the pattern of physiologic alterations that precede overt HAPE. The changes in lung function are consistent with reduced lung compliance and impaired gas exchange. Pronounced nocturnal hypoxemia, ventilatory control instability and sympathetic stimulation are further signs of subsequent overt HAPE.
Registration
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00274430
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041188
PMCID: PMC3400591  PMID: 22829927

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