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1.  Low back pain and physical activity – A 6.5 year follow-up among young adults in their transition from school to working life 
BMC Public Health  2015;15:1115.
Background
The association between leisure time physical activity and low back pain in young adults is unclear and is in the need of prospectively obtained evidence. This study examined the course of low back pain and the association between low back pain and leisure time physical activity in a cohort of young adults in their transition from school to working life.
Methods
Both low back pain and leisure time physical activity was monitored over a 6.5 year period in 420 subjects starting out as students within hairdressing, electrical installation and media/design. The association between physical activity and low back pain was investigated through the follow-up period by using linear mixed models analysis.
Results
Low back pain was significantly influenced by time and overall there was a decreasing trend of low back pain prevalence throughout the follow-up. Analysis showed a weak trend of decreasing low back pain with moderate/high physical activity levels, but this association was not significant.
Conclusions
Low back pain decreased during follow-up with baseline as reference. Findings in our study did show non-significant trends of reduced low back pain with increased leisure time physical activity. Still, we could not support the theory of moderate/high levels of physical activity acting protective against low back pain in young adults entering working life. Our results, in combination with previous relevant research, cannot support a clear relationship between physical activity and low back pain for young adults. Thus, recommendations regarding effect of physical activity on reducing low back pain for this group are not clear.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12889-015-2446-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12889-015-2446-2
PMCID: PMC4643524  PMID: 26563136
Low back pain; Physical activity; Young adults; Longitudinal
2.  Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: A systematic review 
Background
This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome).
Methods
A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed.
Results
A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work.
Conclusions
There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation.
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-11-79
PMCID: PMC2874766  PMID: 20429925

Results 1-2 (2)