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1.  Patients' views on responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders – A qualitative study 
Background
Musculoskeletal disorders are very common and almost inevitable in an individual's lifetime. Enabling self-management and allowing the individual to take responsibility for care is stated as desired in the management of these disorders, but this may be asking more than people can generally manage. A willingness among people to take responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders and not place responsibility out of their hands or on employers but to be shared with medical professionals has been shown. The aim of the present study was to describe how people with musculoskeletal disorders think and reason regarding responsibility for prevention, treatment and management of the disorder.
Methods
Individual interviews with a strategic sample of 20 individuals with musculoskeletal disorders were performed. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to qualitative content analysis.
Results
From the interviews an overarching theme was identified: own responsibility needs to be met. The analysis revealed six interrelated categories: Taking on responsibility, Ambiguity about responsibility, Collaborating responsibility, Complying with recommendations, Disclaiming responsibility, and Responsibility irrelevant. These categories described different thoughts and reasoning regarding the responsibility for managing musculoskeletal disorders. Generally the responsibility for prevention of musculoskeletal disorders was described to lie primarily on society/authorities as they have knowledge of what to prevent and how to prevent it. When musculoskeletal disorders have occurred, health care should provide fast accessibility, diagnosis, prognosis and support for recovery. For long-term management, the individuals themselves are responsible for making the most out of life despite disorders.
Conclusion
No matter what the expressions of responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders are, own responsibility needs to be met by society, health care, employers and family in an appropriate way, with as much or as little of the "right type" of support needed, based on the individual's expectations.
doi:10.1186/1471-2474-10-103
PMCID: PMC2753559  PMID: 19686602
2.  Handling the transition of adolescents with diabetes: participant observations and interviews with care providers in paediatric and adult diabetes outpatient clinics 
Abstract
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to explore how care providers handle the transition process from paediatric to adult diabetes outpatient clinic and to describe their perception of adolescents' needs during this process.
Methods
Participant observations of patient visits to nurses and physicians and 10 semi-structured interviews with care providers in two paediatric and two adult clinics in Sweden were carried out. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method developed in the grounded theory tradition.
Results
The integrated framework developed in the analysis consists of subcategories, process categories and a core phenomenon. The preparation phase showed in this study that preparing transition requires modified strategies. The transition phase implied transferring responsibility and changing care relations while the evaluation phase revealed that care providers are creating mutual understanding through appraisal. All categories are related to the generated core phenomenon: enabling integration through professional meetings. The way care providers construct meeting arenas has a crucial impact on the possibility to bridge uncertainty, insufficient knowledge, routines and strategies.
Conclusions
The way participating clinics handle transition greatly influences the process. Professional meetings appeared to be of vital importance to enable the building of bridges between paediatric and adult diabetes care in this study.
PMCID: PMC1800936  PMID: 17377641
adolescents; Diabetes Mellitus Type 1; transition; grounded theory

Results 1-2 (2)