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1.  The utility of cardiac stress testing for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review 
Background
Heart function tests performed with myocardial stress, or “cardiac stress tests”, may be beneficial for detection of cardiovascular disease. Women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases than the general population, in part due to the direct toxic effects of cancer treatment on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review was to determine the utility of cardiac stress tests for the detection of cardiovascular disease after cardiotoxic breast cancer treatment.
Design
Systematic review.
Methods
Medline and Embase were searched for studies utilizing heart function tests in breast cancer survivors. Studies utilizing a cardiac stress test and a heart function test performed at rest were included to determine whether stress provided added benefit to identifying cardiac abnormalities that were undetected at rest within each study.
Results
Fourteen studies were identified. Overall, there was a benefit to utilizing stress tests over tests at rest in identifying evidence of cardiovascular disease in five studies, a possible benefit in five studies, and no benefit in four studies. The most common type of stress test was myocardial perfusion imaging, where reversible perfusion defects were detected under stress in individuals who had no defects at rest, in five of seven studies of long-term follow-up. Two studies demonstrated the benefit of stress echocardiography over resting echocardiography for detecting left ventricular dysfunction in anthracycline-treated breast cancer survivors. There was no benefit of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in one study. Two studies showed a potential benefit of stress electrocardiography, whereas three others did not.
Conclusion
The use of cardiac stress with myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiography may provide added benefit to tests performed at rest for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors, and merits further research.
doi:10.2147/IJWH.S68745
PMCID: PMC4315553  PMID: 25657599
heart diseases; heart function tests; exercise test; breast neoplasms; review
2.  A global perspective on marine photosynthetic picoeukaryote community structure 
The ISME Journal  2013;7(5):922-936.
A central goal in ecology is to understand the factors affecting the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of microorganisms and the underlying processes causing differences in community structure and composition. However, little is known in this respect for photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs), algae that are now recognised as major players in marine CO2 fixation. Here, we analysed dot blot hybridisation and cloning–sequencing data, using the plastid-encoded 16S rRNA gene, from seven research cruises that encompassed all four ocean biomes. We provide insights into global abundance, α- and β-diversity distribution and the environmental factors shaping PPE community structure and composition. At the class level, the most commonly encountered PPEs were Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae. These taxa displayed complementary distribution patterns, with peak abundances of Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyceae in waters of high (25:1) or low (12:1) nitrogen:phosphorus (N:P) ratio, respectively. Significant differences in phylogenetic composition of PPEs were demonstrated for higher taxonomic levels between ocean basins, using Unifrac analyses of clone library sequence data. Differences in composition were generally greater between basins (interbasins) than within a basin (intrabasin). These differences were primarily linked to taxonomic variation in the composition of Prymnesiophyceae and Prasinophyceae whereas Chrysophyceae were phylogenetically similar in all libraries. These data provide better knowledge of PPE community structure across the world ocean and are crucial in assessing their evolution and contribution to CO2 fixation, especially in the context of global climate change.
doi:10.1038/ismej.2012.166
PMCID: PMC3635238  PMID: 23364354
photosynthetic picoeukaryotes; community structure; prymnesiophytes; chrysophytes; global scale
3.  Short-term responses of unicellular planktonic eukaryotes to increases in temperature and UVB radiation 
BMC Microbiology  2012;12:202.
Background
Small size eukaryotes play a fundamental role in the functioning of coastal ecosystems, however, the way in which these micro-organisms respond to combined effects of water temperature, UVB radiations (UVBR) and nutrient availability is still poorly investigated.
Results
We coupled molecular tools (18S rRNA gene sequencing and fingerprinting) with microscope-based identification and counting to experimentally investigate the short-term responses of small eukaryotes (<6 μm; from a coastal Mediterranean lagoon) to a warming treatment (+3°C) and UVB radiation increases (+20%) at two different nutrient levels. Interestingly, the increase in temperature resulted in higher pigmented eukaryotes abundances and in community structure changes clearly illustrated by molecular analyses. For most of the phylogenetic groups, some rearrangements occurred at the OTUs level even when their relative proportion (microscope counting) did not change significantly. Temperature explained almost 20% of the total variance of the small eukaryote community structure (while UVB explained only 8.4%). However, complex cumulative effects were detected. Some antagonistic or non additive effects were detected between temperature and nutrients, especially for Dinophyceae and Cryptophyceae.
Conclusions
This multifactorial experiment highlights the potential impacts, over short time scales, of changing environmental factors on the structure of various functional groups like small primary producers, parasites and saprotrophs which, in response, can modify energy flow in the planktonic food webs.
doi:10.1186/1471-2180-12-202
PMCID: PMC3478981  PMID: 22966751
Small eukaryotes; Molecular diversity; Temperature; UVB radiation; Microcosms experiment; Mediterranean lagoon

Results 1-3 (3)