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1.  A Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase Gene Fusion Functions in Visual Perception in a Fungus 
Current Biology  2014;24(11):1234-1240.
Summary
Sensing light is the fundamental property of visual systems, with vision in animals being based almost exclusively on opsin photopigments [1]. Rhodopsin also acts as a photoreceptor linked to phototaxis in green algae [2, 3] and has been implicated by chemical means as a light sensor in the flagellated swimming zoospores of the fungus Allomyces reticulatus [4]; however, the signaling mechanism in these fungi remains unknown. Here we use a combination of genome sequencing and molecular inhibition experiments with light-sensing phenotype studies to examine the signaling pathway involved in visual perception in the closely related fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. Our data show that in these fungi, light perception is accomplished by the function of a novel gene fusion (BeGC1) of a type I (microbial) rhodopsin domain and guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain. Photobleaching of rhodopsin function prevents accumulation of cGMP levels and phototaxis of fungal zoospores exposed to green light, whereas inhibition of guanylyl cyclase activity negatively affects fungal phototaxis. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the BeGC1 protein to the external surface of the zoospore eyespot positioned close to the base of the swimming flagellum [4, 5], demonstrating this is a photoreceptive organelle composed of lipid droplets. Taken together, these data indicate that Blastocladiomycota fungi have a cGMP signaling pathway involved in phototaxis similar to the vertebrate vision-signaling cascade but composed of protein domain components arranged as a novel gene fusion architecture and of distant evolutionary ancestry to type II rhodopsins of animals.
Highlights
•A rhodopsin-guanylate cyclase gene fusion is involved in B. emersonii phototaxis•The rhodopsin fusion protein BeGC1 is localized to the zoospore eyespot apparatus•Endogenous retinal substitution by retinalA1 reconstitutes green light phototaxis•Zoospore phototaxis uses cGMP as a second messenger similar to vertebrate vision
Avelar et al. use genome sequencing, molecular inhibition, and light-sensing phenotype experiments, combined with immunolocalization data, to show that a type I rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase fusion protein localizes to the “eyespot” and is involved in green light phototaxis in zoospores of the Blastocladiomycete fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.
doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.009
PMCID: PMC4046227  PMID: 24835457
2.  Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor σF is involved in Caulobacter crescentus response to heavy metal stress 
BMC Microbiology  2012;12:210.
Background
The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus inhabits low-nutrient environments and can tolerate certain levels of heavy metals in these sites. It has been reported that C. crescentus responds to exposure to various heavy metals by altering the expression of a large number of genes.
Results
In this work, we show that the ECF sigma factor σF is one of the regulatory proteins involved in the control of the transcriptional response to chromium and cadmium. Microarray experiments indicate that σF controls eight genes during chromium stress, most of which were previously described as induced by heavy metals. Surprisingly, σF itself is not strongly auto-regulated under metal stress conditions. Interestingly, σF-dependent genes are not induced in the presence of agents that generate reactive oxygen species. Promoter analyses revealed that a conserved σF-dependent sequence is located upstream of all genes of the σF regulon. In addition, we show that the second gene in the sigF operon acts as a negative regulator of σF function, and the encoded protein has been named NrsF (Negative regulator of sigma F). Substitution of two conserved cysteine residues (C131 and C181) in NrsF affects its ability to maintain the expression of σF-dependent genes at basal levels. Furthermore, we show that σF is released into the cytoplasm during chromium stress and in cells carrying point mutations in both conserved cysteines of the protein NrsF.
Conclusion
A possible mechanism for induction of the σF-dependent genes by chromium and cadmium is the inactivation of the putative anti-sigma factor NrsF, leading to the release of σF to bind RNA polymerase core and drive transcription of its regulon.
doi:10.1186/1471-2180-12-210
PMCID: PMC3511200  PMID: 22985357
Stress response; ECF sigma factor σF; Chromium; Cadmium; Caulobacter crescentus

Results 1-2 (2)