PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-10 (10)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Advances in PET Imaging of P-Glycoprotein Function at the Blood-Brain Barrier 
ACS Chemical Neuroscience  2012;4(2):225-237.
Efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts substrate compounds from entering the brain and may thus contribute to pharmacoresistance observed in patient groups with refractory epilepsy and HIV. Altered P-gp function has also been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Positron emission tomography (PET), a molecular imaging modality, has become a promising method to study the role of P-gp at the BBB. The first PET study of P-gp function was conducted in 1998, and during the past 15 years two main categories of P-gp PET tracers have been investigated: tracers that are substrates of P-gp efflux and tracers that are inhibitors of P-gp function. PET, as a noninvasive imaging technique, allows translational research. Examples of this are preclinical investigations of P-gp function before and after administering P-gp modulating drugs, investigations in various animal and disease models, and clinical investigations regarding disease and aging. The objective of the present review is to give an overview of available PET radiotracers for studies of P-gp and to discuss how such studies can be designed. Further, the review summarizes results from PET studies of P-gp function in different central nervous system disorders.
doi:10.1021/cn3001729
PMCID: PMC3582299  PMID: 23421673
P-Glycoprotein; CNS disease; PET; radiotracer; blood-brain barrier; efflux transporters; drug interactions
2.  Pharmacokinetic modeling of P-glycoprotein function at the rat and human blood–brain barriers studied with (R)-[11C]verapamil positron emission tomography 
EJNMMI Research  2012;2:58.
Background
This study investigated the influence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor tariquidar on the pharmacokinetics of P-gp substrate radiotracer (R)-[11C]verapamil in plasma and brain of rats and humans by means of positron emission tomography (PET).
Methods
Data obtained from a preclinical and clinical study, in which paired (R)-[11C]verapamil PET scans were performed before, during, and after tariquidar administration, were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling. Administration of tariquidar was included as a covariate on the influx and efflux parameters (Qin and Qout) in order to investigate if tariquidar increased influx or decreased outflux of radiotracer across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Additionally, the influence of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) was tested on all model parameters, and the brain-to-plasma partition coefficient (VT-NLME) was calculated.
Results
Our model indicated that tariquidar enhances brain uptake of (R)-[11C]verapamil by decreasing Qout. The reduction in Qout in rats during and immediately after tariquidar administration (sevenfold) was more pronounced than in the second PET scan acquired 2 h after tariquidar administration (fivefold). The effect of tariquidar on Qout in humans was apparent during and immediately after tariquidar administration (twofold reduction in Qout) but was negligible in the second PET scan. SE was found to influence the pharmacological volume of distribution of the central brain compartment Vbr1. Tariquidar treatment lead to an increase in VT-NLME, and pilocarpine-induced SE lead to increased (R)-[11C]verapamil distribution to the peripheral brain compartment.
Conclusions
Using NLME modeling, we were able to provide mechanistic insight into the effects of tariquidar and SE on (R)-[11C]verapamil transport across the BBB in control and 48 h post SE rats as well as in humans.
doi:10.1186/2191-219X-2-58
PMCID: PMC3520775  PMID: 23072492
Nonlinear mixed effects modeling; Positron emission tomography; (R)-[11C]verapamil; P-glycoprotein; Tariquidar; Pilocarpine-induced epilepsy; Species differences
3.  [11C]phenytoin revisited: synthesis by [11C]CO carbonylation and first evaluation as a P-gp tracer in rats 
EJNMMI Research  2012;2:36.
Background
At present, several positron emission tomography (PET) tracers are in use for imaging P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function in man. At baseline, substrate tracers such as R-[11C]verapamil display low brain concentrations with a distribution volume of around 1. [11C]phenytoin is supposed to be a weaker P-gp substrate, which may lead to higher brain concentrations at baseline. This could facilitate assessment of P-gp function when P-gp is upregulated. The purpose of this study was to synthesize [11C]phenytoin and to characterize its properties as a P-gp tracer.
Methods
[11C]CO was used to synthesize [11C]phenytoin by rhodium-mediated carbonylation. Metabolism and, using PET, brain pharmacokinetics of [11C]phenytoin were studied in rats. Effects of P-gp function on [11C]phenytoin uptake were assessed using predosing with tariquidar.
Results
[11C]phenytoin was synthesized via [11C]CO in an overall decay-corrected yield of 22 ± 4%. At 45 min after administration, 19% and 83% of radioactivity represented intact [11C]phenytoin in the plasma and brain, respectively. Compared with baseline, tariquidar predosing resulted in a 45% increase in the cerebral distribution volume of [11C]phenytoin.
Conclusions
Using [11C]CO, the radiosynthesis of [11C]phenytoin could be improved. [11C]phenytoin appeared to be a rather weak P-gp substrate.
doi:10.1186/2191-219X-2-36
PMCID: PMC3506555  PMID: 22747744
Phenytoin; PET; Tariquidar; Probenecid; [11C]CO; BBB; P-gp; [11C]CO2 purification
4.  [11C]Flumazenil brain uptake is influenced by the blood-brain barrier efflux transporter P-glycoprotein 
EJNMMI Research  2012;2:12.
Background
[11C]Flumazenil and positron emission tomography (PET) are used clinically to assess gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic function and to localize epileptic foci prior to resective surgery. Enhanced P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity has been reported in epilepsy and this may confound interpretation of clinical scans if [11C]flumazenil is a P-gp substrate. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether [11C]flumazenil is a P-gp substrate.
Methods
[11C]Flumazenil PET scans were performed in wild type (WT) (n = 9) and Mdr1a/1b, (the genes that encode for P-gp) double knockout (dKO) (n = 10) mice, and in naive rats (n = 10). In parallel to PET scanning, [11C]flumazenil plasma concentrations were measured in rats. For 6 of the WT and 6 of the dKO mice a second, [11C]flumazenil scan was acquired after administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. Cerebral [11C]flumazenil concentrations in WT and Mdr1a/1b dKO mice were compared (genetic disruption model). Furthermore, pre and post P-gp-blocking cerebral [11C]flumazenil concentrations were compared in all animals (pharmacological inhibition model).
Results
Mdr1a/1b dKO mice had approximately 70% higher [11C]flumazenil uptake in the brain than WT mice. After administration of tariquidar, cerebral [11C]flumazenil uptake in WT mice increased by about 80% in WT mice, while it remained the same in Mdr1a/1b dKO mice. In rats, cerebral [11C]flumazenil uptake increased by about 60% after tariquidar administration. Tariquidar had only a small effect on plasma clearance of flumazenil.
Conclusions
The present study showed that [11C]flumazenil is a P-gp substrate in rodents. Consequently, altered cerebral [11C]flumazenil uptake, as observed in epilepsy, may not reflect solely GABAA receptor density changes but also changes in P-gp activity.
doi:10.1186/2191-219X-2-12
PMCID: PMC3348032  PMID: 22455873
Positron emission tomography; PET; tariquidar; rodents; GABAA receptors; P-glycoprotein; epilepsy
5.  Alteration in P-glycoprotein Functionality Affects Intrabrain Distribution of Quinidine More Than Brain Entry—A Study in Rats Subjected to Status Epilepticus by Kainate 
The AAPS Journal  2012;14(1):87-96.
This study aimed to investigate the use of quinidine microdialysis to study potential changes in brain P-glycoprotein functionality after induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainate. Rats were infused with 10 or 20 mg/kg quinidine over 30 min or 4 h. Plasma, brain extracellular fluid (brain ECF), and end-of-experiment total brain concentrations of quinidine were determined during 7 h after the start of the infusion. Effect of pretreatment with tariquidar (15 mg/kg, administered 30 min before the start of the quinidine infusion) on the brain distribution of quinidine was assessed. This approach was repeated in kainate-treated rats. Quinidine kinetics were analyzed with population modeling (NONMEM). The quinidine microdialysis assay clearly revealed differences in brain distribution upon changes in P-glycoprotein functionality by pre-administration of tariquidar, which resulted in a 7.2-fold increase in brain ECF and a 40-fold increase in total brain quinidine concentration. After kainate treatment alone, however, no difference in quinidine transport across the blood–brain barrier was found, but kainate-treated rats tended to have a lower total brain concentration but a higher brain ECF concentration of quinidine than saline-treated rats. This study did not provide evidence for the hypothesis that P-glycoprotein function at the blood–brain barrier is altered at 1 week after SE induction, but rather suggests that P-glycoprotein function might be altered at the brain parenchymal level.
doi:10.1208/s12248-011-9318-1
PMCID: PMC3281999  PMID: 22215264
blood–brain barrier; epilepsy; microdialysis; P-glycoprotein (P-gp); quinidine
6.  Alteration in P-glycoprotein Functionality Affects Intrabrain Distribution of Quinidine More Than Brain Entry—A Study in Rats Subjected to Status Epilepticus by Kainate 
The AAPS Journal  2012;14(1):87-96.
This study aimed to investigate the use of quinidine microdialysis to study potential changes in brain P-glycoprotein functionality after induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainate. Rats were infused with 10 or 20 mg/kg quinidine over 30 min or 4 h. Plasma, brain extracellular fluid (brain ECF), and end-of-experiment total brain concentrations of quinidine were determined during 7 h after the start of the infusion. Effect of pretreatment with tariquidar (15 mg/kg, administered 30 min before the start of the quinidine infusion) on the brain distribution of quinidine was assessed. This approach was repeated in kainate-treated rats. Quinidine kinetics were analyzed with population modeling (NONMEM). The quinidine microdialysis assay clearly revealed differences in brain distribution upon changes in P-glycoprotein functionality by pre-administration of tariquidar, which resulted in a 7.2-fold increase in brain ECF and a 40-fold increase in total brain quinidine concentration. After kainate treatment alone, however, no difference in quinidine transport across the blood–brain barrier was found, but kainate-treated rats tended to have a lower total brain concentration but a higher brain ECF concentration of quinidine than saline-treated rats. This study did not provide evidence for the hypothesis that P-glycoprotein function at the blood–brain barrier is altered at 1 week after SE induction, but rather suggests that P-glycoprotein function might be altered at the brain parenchymal level.
doi:10.1208/s12248-011-9318-1
PMCID: PMC3281999  PMID: 22215264
blood–brain barrier; epilepsy; microdialysis; P-glycoprotein (P-gp); quinidine; Biomedicine; Biotechnology; Pharmacy; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Biochemistry, general
7.  (R)-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus 
BMC Medical Imaging  2011;11:1.
Background
Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate.
Methods
(R)-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM).
Results
All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats.
Conclusions
P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.
doi:10.1186/1471-2342-11-1
PMCID: PMC3022839  PMID: 21199574
8.  On The Rate and Extent of Drug Delivery to the Brain 
Pharmaceutical Research  2007;25(8):1737-1750.
To define and differentiate relevant aspects of blood–brain barrier transport and distribution in order to aid research methodology in brain drug delivery. Pharmacokinetic parameters relative to the rate and extent of brain drug delivery are described and illustrated with relevant data, with special emphasis on the unbound, pharmacologically active drug molecule. Drug delivery to the brain can be comprehensively described using three parameters: Kp,uu (concentration ratio of unbound drug in brain to blood), CLin (permeability clearance into the brain), and Vu,brain (intra-brain distribution). The permeability of the blood–brain barrier is less relevant to drug action within the CNS than the extent of drug delivery, as most drugs are administered on a continuous (repeated) basis. Kp,uu can differ between CNS-active drugs by a factor of up to 150-fold. This range is much smaller than that for log BB ratios (Kp), which can differ by up to at least 2,000-fold, or for BBB permeabilities, which span an even larger range (up to at least 20,000-fold difference). Methods that measure the three parameters Kp,uu, CLin, and Vu,brain can give clinically valuable estimates of brain drug delivery in early drug discovery programmes.
doi:10.1007/s11095-007-9502-2
PMCID: PMC2469271  PMID: 18058202
blood–brain barrier; brain penetration; drug delivery; permeability clearance; unbound concentration
9.  A computerized Infusion Pump for control of tissue tracer concentration during Positron Emission Tomography in vivo Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic measurements 
Background
A computer controlled infusion pump (UIPump) for regulation of target tissue concentration of radioactive compounds was developed for use in biological research and tracer development for PET.
Methods
Based on observed tissue or plasma kinetics after a bolus injection of the tracer an algorithm calculates the infusion needed to obtain a specified target kinetic curve. A computer feeds this infusion scheme into an infusion pump connected to an animal via a venous catheter. The concept was validated using [11C]Flumazenil administrated to Sprague-Dawley rats where the whole brain distribution and kinetic of the tracer was measured over time using a microPET-scanner. The accuracy and precision of the system was assessed by producing steady-state levels of the tracer and by mimicking kinetics after oral administration.
Results
Various kinetic profiles could be generated, including rapid achievement of constant levels, or step-wise increased levels. The resulting tissue curves had low deviation from the target curves according to the specified criteria: AUC (%): 4.2 ± 2.8, Maximal deviation (%): 13.6 ± 5.0 and R2: 0.95 ± 0.02.
Conclusion
The UIPump-system is suitable for use in PET-research for assessment of PK/PD properties by simulation of different tracer tissue kinetics in vivo.
doi:10.1186/1756-6649-8-2
PMCID: PMC2430701  PMID: 18513382
10.  Synthesis of two potential NK1-receptor ligands using [1-11C]ethyl iodide and [1-11C]propyl iodide and initial PET-imaging 
Background
The previously validated NK1-receptor ligand [O-methyl-11C]GR205171 binds with a high affinity to the NK1-receptor and displays a slow dissociation from the receptor. Hence, it cannot be used in vivo for detecting concentration changes in substance P, the endogenous ligand for the NK1-receptor. A radioligand used for monitoring these changes has to enable displacement by the endogenous ligand and thus bind reversibly to the receptor. Small changes in the structure of a receptor ligand can lead to changes in binding characteristics and also in the ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The aim of this study was to use carbon-11 labelled ethyl and propyl iodide with high specific radioactivity in the synthesis of two new and potentially reversible NK1-receptor ligands with chemical structures based on [O-methyl-11C]GR205171.
Methods
[1-11C]Ethyl and [1-11C]propyl iodide with specific radioactivities of 90 GBq/μmol and 270 GBq/μmol, respectively, were used in the synthesis of [O-methyl-11C]GR205171 analogues by alkylation of O-desmethyl GR205171. The brain uptake of the obtained (2S,3S)-N-(1-(2- [1-11C]ethoxy-5-(3-(trifluoromethyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)phenyl)ethyl)-2-phenylpiperidin-3-amine (I) and (2S,3S)-2-phenyl-N-(1-(2- [1-11C]propoxy-5-(3-(trifluoromethyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)phenyl)ethyl)piperidin-3-amine (II) was studied with PET in guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys and compared to the uptake of [O-methyl-11C]GR205171.
Results
All ligands had similar uptake distribution in the guinea pig brain. The PET-studies in rhesus monkeys showed that (II) had no specific binding in striatum. Ligand (I) had moderate specific binding compared to the [O-methyl-11C]GR205171. The ethyl analogue (I) displayed reversible binding characteristics contrary to the slow dissociation rate shown by [O-methyl-11C]GR205171.
Conclusion
The propyl-analogue (II) cannot be used for detecting changes in NK1-ligand levels, while further studies should be performed with the ethyl-analogue (I).
doi:10.1186/1471-2342-7-6
PMCID: PMC1959516  PMID: 17663770

Results 1-10 (10)