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1.  Impact of health education intervention on insecticide treated nets uptake among nursing mothers in rural communities in Nigeria 
BMC Research Notes  2012;5:444.
Background
ITN use is generally poor in Nigeria among all categories of people. Although use of ITNs has been shown to reduce malarial morbidity and mortality, this measure needs to be supported by an adequate healthcare system providing ITN possibly at the household level. This study was therefore designed to determine the effect of health education on the uptake of ITN among nursing mothers in rural communities in Nigeria.
Methods
The study design was a quasi-experimental study carried out in Ijebu North Local Government Area of Ogun State. A multistage random sampling technique was used in choosing the required samples for this study and a semi- structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. The intervention consisted of a structured educational programme based on a course content adapted from the national malaria control programme. A total of 400 respondents were recruited into the study with 200 each in both the experimental and control groups and were followed up for a period of 3 months when the knowledge and uptake of ITN was reassessed.
Result
There was no significant difference (P >0.05) observed between the experimental and control groups in terms of socio-dermographic characteristics such as age, marital status, religion, and income. The ITN ever users in experimental group were 59 [29.5%] and 138 [72.6%] in pre and post intervention period, respectively (p value =0.0001). These proportions of ITN ever users were 55 [27.5%] and 57 [31.6%] in control group, during the pre and post intervention periods (p = 0.37). Post health education intervention, degree of change in knowledge of ITN re-treatment [37.0%] and mounting [33.5%], readiness to use if given free [30.5%] and belief in efficacy [36.9%] improved significantly in the experimental group while there was no significant change in the control group [p = 0.84, 0.51, 0.68 &0.69 respectively]. Majority [89%] of the respondents were willing to buy ITN for between US$ 1.5 to US$ 3.0. There was no statistically significant change (P >0.05) despite intervention in the amount the respondents were willing to pay to own an ITN in both the experimental and control groups.
Conclusion
The study concludes that the use of ITN in the study population was significantly increase by health education and that the free distribution of ITN may not guarantee its use. Uptake of ITN can be significantly improved in rural areas if the nets are made available and backed up with appropriate health education intervention.
doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-444
PMCID: PMC3496686  PMID: 22901329
ITN; Utilization; Malaria; Health education intervention; Nursing mothers; Rural Nigeria
2.  Determinants of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) utilization in a rural town in Western Nigeria 
Reproductive Health  2012;9:12.
Background
Malaria infection in pregnancy is a major risk factor for maternal and child death, and substantially increases the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and low birthweight. The aim of this study therefore is to assess the prevalence and determinants of Intermittent preventive treatment of Malaria [IPTp] utilization by pregnant women in a rural town in Western Nigeria.
Methods
This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. All pregnant women that were due for delivery and were attending the three primary health care center in Sagamu town, Nigeria within a 2 months period were recruited into the study. A semi- structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information.
Results
A total of 255 pregnant women were recruited into the study. The mean age of respondents was 28.07 ± 5.12 years. The mean parity and booking age was 2.7 ± 1.67 and 4.42 ± 1.7 months respectively. The prevalence of Malaria attack in the last 3 months was 122(47.8%). Only 107/255 (40.4%) practice IPTp for malaria prevention during the current pregnancy, with only 14.6% of them taking the second dose during pregnancy as recommended. Chloroquine [27.1%] was the most frequently used medication for the treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy. Early booking age [OR = 1.11, C.I = 0.61–2.01], adverse last pregnancy outcome [OR = 1.23, C.I = 0.36–4.22], and parity [OR = 1.87, C.I = 0.25–16.09] were not statistically significantly associated with IPTp utilization. The only predictor of IPTp use was the knowledge of prophylaxis for malaria prevention [OR = 2.47, C.I = 1.06–3.52] using multivariate analysis.
Conclusion
The study concludes that most women who attend ANC in rural areas in Nigeria do not receive IPTp as expected. A major determinant of utilization of IPTp among the study population was the knowledge of prophylaxis for malaria prevention. This study highlights the importance of health education of the pregnant women in increasing IPTp uptake despite the regular drug stock out at the facility level in rural areas in low resource countries.
doi:10.1186/1742-4755-9-12
PMCID: PMC3453493  PMID: 22889320
IPTp utilization; Determinants; Rural Nigeria; Malaria in Pregnancy
3.  A comparative analysis of teenagers and older pregnant women in the utilization of prevention of mother to child transmission [PMTCT] services in, Western Nigeria 
Introduction
Most HIV/AIDS infections in women occur at a younger age, during the first few years after sexual debut. This study was therefore designed to assess factors associated with the knowledge and utilization of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services by the teenage pregnant women when compared to mature pregnant women in Ogun state, Nigeria.
Methods
This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A total sample of all pregnant women [52 teenagers and 148 adults] attending the primary health care centres in Sagamu local government area, Ogun State, Nigeria within a 2 months period were recruited into the study.
Results
A total of 225 respondents were recruited into the study. The overall point prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection among those that had been tested and disclosed their result was 4 [2.8%]. The prevalence of HIV among the teenagers was 2 [7.4%] compared with 2 [1.8%] among older women. Only 85 [37.8%] of all respondents were tested through the Voluntary counseling and testing (VCCT) programme and 53 (23.7%) were aware of antiretroviral therapy while 35 (15.6%) have ever used the PMTCT services before.
There was no statistically significant difference in the knowledge of the teenage pregnant women when compared with the older women about mother to child transmission (MTCT) [OR = 1.47, C.I = 0.57-3.95] and its prevention [OR = 0.83, C.I = 0.38-1.84]. The teenagers were 3 times less likely to use the services when compared with the older women. [OR = 0.34, C.I = 0.10-1.00]. Those from the low socio-economic background were about 6 times more likely to utilize PMTCT facilities when compared to those from high socioeconomic background [OR = 6.01, C.I = 1.91-19.19].
Conclusion
The study concludes that the teenage pregnant women who were more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS infection did not utilize PMTCT services as much as the older pregnant women. Special consideration should be given to teenagers and those from high socioeconomic group in the design of scale up programmes to improve the uptake of PMTCT services in Nigeria and other low income countries.
doi:10.1186/1472-698X-12-13
PMCID: PMC3492029  PMID: 22883969
4.  A comparative analysis of predictors of teenage pregnancy and its prevention in a rural town in Western Nigeria 
Introduction
Teenagers younger than 15 are five times more likely to die during pregnancy or childbirth than women in their twenties and mortality rates for their infants are higher as well. This study was therefore designed to determine the recent prevalence and identify factors associated with teenage pregnancy in a rural town in Nigeria.
Methods
This study is an analytical comparative cross-sectional study. A total sample of all pregnant women attending the primary health care in Sagamu local government area, Ogun State within a 2 months period were recruited into the study.
Results
A total of 225 pregnant women were recruited into the study. The prevalence of teenage pregnancy was 22.9%. Teenagers [48.2%] reported more unwanted pregnancy when compared with the older age group [13.6%] [OR = 5.91, C.I = 2.83-12.43]. About half 33 [41.1%] of the teenage pregnant women and 28.6% of the older pregnant women did not know how to correctly use condom to prevent pregnancy [OR = 0.57, C.I = 0.29-1.13]. Predictors of teenage pregnancy were low social class (OR = 2.25, C.I = 1.31-3.85], Religion (OR = 0.44, C.I = 0.21-0.91], being a student (OR = 3.27, C.I = 1.02-10.46) and having a white collar job (OR = 0.09, C.I = 0.01-0.81).
Conclusion
The study concludes that employment in an established organization (white collar job) is highly protective against teenage pregnancy while students are becoming increasingly prone to early pregnancy. Government should structure employment in low income countries in such a way as to give a quota to adolescents who are unable to continue their education.
doi:10.1186/1475-9276-11-37
PMCID: PMC3771409  PMID: 22846253
Predictors; Teenage pregnancy; Prevention; Rural town; Nigeria
5.  The effect of health education intervention on the home management of malaria among the caregivers of children aged under 5 years in Ogun State, Nigeria 
Background
Malaria is currently the most important cause of death and disability in children aged under 5 years in Africa. A health education interventional study of this nature is essential in primary control of an endemic communicable disease such as malaria. This study was therefore designed to determine the effect of health education on the home management of Malaria among the caregivers of children under 5 years old in Ogun State, Nigeria.
Methods
The study design was a quasi-experimental study carried out in Ijebu North Local Government Area of Ogun State. A multistage random sampling technique was used in choosing the required samples for this study and a semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. The intervention consisted of a structured educational program based on a course content adapted from the national malaria control program. A total of 400 respondents were recruited into the study, with 200 each in both the experimental and control groups, and were followed up for a period of 3 months when the knowledge and uptake of insecticide treated net was reassessed.
Results
There was no statistically significant differences observed between the experimental and control groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics such as age (P = 0.99), marital status (P = 0.48), religion (P = 0.1), and income (P = 0.51). The majority in both the experimental (75.0%) and control (71.5%) groups use arthemisinin-based combination therapy as first line home treatment drugs pre intervention. Post health education intervention, the degree of change in the knowledge of referral signs and symptoms in the experimental group was 52.8% (P < 0.0001) while it was 0.2% in the control group (P = 0.93). Tepid sponging improved by 45.0%, paracetamol use by 55.3%, and the use of herbs and other drugs were not significantly influenced in the experimental (P = 0.65 and 0.99) and control group (P = 0.89 and 0.88), respectively. Furthermore, there was a 55.7% (P = 0.001) increase in the proportion of respondents using the correct dose of arthemisinin-based combination therapy in the home management of malaria and 23.9% (P < 0.001) in the proportion using it for the required time.
Conclusions
The study concludes that there is a shift in the home management of malaria with the use of current and effective antimalarial drugs. It also demonstrated the effect of health education on the promptness of appropriate actions taken among the respondents for early diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can be guaranteed if caregivers are knowledgeable on prompt actions to be taken in the home management of malaria.
doi:10.1186/2047-783X-17-11
PMCID: PMC3462120  PMID: 22594678
Home management; Malaria; Health education intervention; Children aged under 5 years; Nigeria
6.  Determinants of insecticide treated nets use among youth corp members in Edo State, Nigeria 
BMC Public Health  2011;11:728.
Background
The Africa Malaria Report shows that many countries are quite far from reaching the universal coverage targets of 80% coverage by 2010 and maintain it at this level. This paper examines ITN use and the factors associated with its adoption among the youths in Nigeria. This information will help in the design of effective methods of providing and distributing the nets in order to enhance its adoption and maximize the public health benefits of ITNs.
Methods
This cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2006 among university leavers serving compulsory national service (youth corpers) using total sampling technique. The study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire.
Results
A total of 656 youth corp members were interviewed. Only 23.8% of these youths ever use ITN while 4.3% currently use ITN before reporting in camp. A significant proportion of the youths acquired information on ITN from Mass Media (p = 0.0001). Other statistically significant factors that encourage the use of ITN include inexpensive market price of ITN (p = 0.0001), frequency of Malaria infestation (p = 0.019) and perceived malaria preventive action of ITN ( p = 0.000).
Following logistic regression analysis, perceived effective malaria preventive action of ITN [OR = 29.3, C.I = 17.17-50.0] and high frequency of Malaria infestation [OR = 1.55, C.I = 0.97-2.47] were predictors of ITN use.
Conclusion
The study shows that the use of ITN for the prevention of Malaria is low among these Nigerian youths. The major factors determining the adoption of ITN among the youths were perceived effective Malaria prevention action of ITN and high frequency of Malaria attack. These factors should be considered in the design of sustainable and effective locally relevant strategies for scale-up adoption of ITNs among a youthful African population.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-11-728
PMCID: PMC3191373  PMID: 21943107
ITN use; Nigerian Youths; Adoption of ITN; Malaria Prevention

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