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1.  Functional Activity of Monocytes and Macrophages in HTLV-1 Infected Subjects 
The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC), 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS) not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the increasing inflammatory activity of macrophages was similar in HAM/TSP patients and HC and it was related to HTLV-1 proviral load rather than the high IFN-γ production observed in these subjects.
Author Summary
HTLV-1 predominantly infects T cells, inducing cell proliferation and activation. While there is a larger amount of studies regarding T cells functions in HTLV-1 infected subjects, little is known about innate immunity. We evaluated monocyte and macrophage functions in HTLV-1 infected subjects. We observed that HAM/TSP patients have an increased frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells was similar between HTLV-1 infected subjects and healthy subjects (HS). Additionally, the microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects to kill Leishmania braziliensis is preserved, and these cells showed inflammatory profile, producing more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than macrophages from HS. It was important to determine if the exacerbated ability of macrophages to secrete cytokine was due to IFN-γ production. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ levels by PBMCs and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a direct correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10 levels. Our data indicate that despite the high production of proinflammatory mediators, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects kill an intracellular pathogen in similar levels than cells from HS and pointed out for the role of viral factors inducing the inflammatory response in these cells.
doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003399
PMCID: PMC4270688  PMID: 25521499
6.  Immunological and Viral Features in Patients with Overactive Bladder Associated with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection 
Journal of medical virology  2012;84(11):1809-1817.
The majority of patients infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-type 1 (HTLV-1) are considered carriers, but a high frequency of urinary symptoms of overactive bladder, common in HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) have been documented in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine if immunological and viral factors that are seen in HAM/TSP are also observed in these patients. Participants were classified as HTLV-1 carriers (n=45), HTLV-1 patients suffering from overactive bladder (n=45) and HAM/TSP (n=45). Cells from HTLV-1 overactive bladder patients produced spontaneously more proinflammatory cytokines than carriers. TNF-α and IL-17 levels were similar in HAM/TSP and HTLV-1 overactive bladder patients. High proviral load was found in patients with overactive bladder and HAM/TSP and correlated with proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast with findings in patients with HAM/TSP, serum levels of Th1 chemokines were similar in HTLV-1 overactive bladder and carriers. Exogenous addition of regulatory cytokines decreased spontaneous IFN-γ production in cell cultures from HTLV-1 overactive bladder patients. The results show that HTLV-1 overactive bladder and HAM/TSP patients have in common some immunological features as well as similar proviral load profile. The data show that HTLV-1 overactive bladder patients are still able to down regulate their inflammatory immune response. In addition, these patients express levels of chemokines similar to carriers, which may explain why they have yet to develop the same degree of spinal cord damage as seen in patients with HAM/TSP. These patients present symptoms of overactive bladder, which may be an early sign of HAM/TSP.
doi:10.1002/jmv.23341
PMCID: PMC3457650  PMID: 22997085
HTLV-1; immune response; cytokines; chemokines; proviral load
7.  Influence of HTLV-1 on the clinical, microbiologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2012;12:199.
Background
HTLV-1 is associated with increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and severity of tuberculosis. Although previous studies have shown that HTLV-1 infected individuals have a low frequency of positive tuberculin skin test (TST) and decreasing in lymphoproliferative responses compared to HTLV-1 uninfected persons, these studies were not performed in individuals with history of tuberculosis or evidence of M. tuberculosis infection. Therefore the reasons why HTLV-1 infection increases susceptibility to infection and severity of tuberculosis are not understood.The aim of this study was to evaluate how HTLV-1 may influence the clinical, bacteriologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis.
Methods
The study prospectively enrolled and followed 13 new cases of tuberculosis associated with HTLV-1 (cases) and 25 patients with tuberculosis without HTLV-1 infection (controls). Clinical findings, bacterial load in the sputum, x-rays, immunological response and death were compared in the two groups.
Results
There were no differences in the demographic, clinical and TST response between the two study groups. IFN-γ and TNF-α production was higher in unstimulated cultures of mononuclear cells of case than in control patients (p < 0.01). While there was no difference in IFN-γ production in PPD stimulated cultures, TNF-α levels were lower in cases than in controls (p = 0.01). There was no difference in the bacterial load among the groups but sputum smear microscopy results became negative faster in cases than in controls. Death only occurred in two co-infected patients.
Conclusion
While the increased susceptibility for tuberculosis infection in HTLV-1 infected subjects may be related to impairment in TNF-α production, the severity of tuberculosis in co-infected patients may be due to the enhancement of the Th1 inflammatory response, rather than in their decreased ability to control bacterial growth.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-199
PMCID: PMC3449207  PMID: 22925731
HTLV-1; Tuberculosis; Mycobacterium tuberculosis
10.  Resistance of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis to nitric oxide: correlation with antimony therapy and TNF-α production 
BMC Infectious Diseases  2010;10:209.
Background
Nitric oxide (NO) produced in macrophages plays a pivotal role as a leishmanicidal agent. A previous study has demonstrated that 20% of the L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from initial cutaneous lesions of patients from the endemic area of Corte de Pedra, Bahia, Brazil, were NO resistant. Additionally, 5 to 11% of the patients did not respond to three or more antimony treatments" (refractory patients). The aim of this study is to investigate if there is an association between the resistance of L. (V.) braziliensis to NO and nonresponsiveness to antimony therapy and cytokine production.
Methods
We evaluated the in vitro toxicity of NO against the promastigotes stages of L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from responsive and refractory patients, and the infectivity of the amastigote forms of these isolates against human macrophages. The supernatants from Leishmania infected macrophage were used to measure TNF-α and IL-10 levels.
Results
Using NaNO2 (pH 5.0) as the NO source, L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from refractory patients were more NO resistant (IC50 = 5.8 ± 4.8) than L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from responsive patients (IC50 = 2.0 ± 1.4). Four isolates were selected to infect human macrophages: NO-susceptible and NO-resistant L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from responsive and refractory patients. NO-resistant L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from refractory patients infected more macrophages stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ at 120 hours than NO-susceptible L. (V.) braziliensis isolated from refractory patients. Also, lower levels of TNF-α were detected in supernatants of macrophages infected with NO-resistant L. (V.) braziliensis as compared to macrophages infected with NO-susceptible L. (V.) braziliensis (p < 0.05 at 2, 24 and 120 hours), while no differences were detected in IL-10 levels.
Conclusion
These data suggest that NO resistance could be related to the nonresponsiveness to antimony therapy seen in American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-10-209
PMCID: PMC2915995  PMID: 20633260

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