PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Soluble Factors from Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 Have Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Acute Lung Injury Induced by Lipopolysaccharide in Mice 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(10):e110027.
We have previously demonstrated that Lactobacillus reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to reduce TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The aims of this study were to determine whether L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors were able to modulate in vitro the inflammatory response triggered by LPS in murine macrophages, to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect, and to evaluate in vivo its capacity to exert anti-inflammatory actions in acute lung injury induced by LPS in mice. In vitro assays demonstrated that L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (NO, COX-2, and Hsp70) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, and IL-6) caused by the stimulation of macrophages with LPS. NF-kB and PI3K inhibition by L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors contributed to these inhibitory effects. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway and the diminished expression of CD14 could be involved in the immunoregulatory effect. In addition, our in vivo data proved that the LPS-induced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells recruitment to the airways and inflammatory lung tissue damage were reduced in L. reuteri CRL1098 soluble factors treated mice, providing a new way to reduce excessive pulmonary inflammation.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0110027
PMCID: PMC4201513  PMID: 25329163
2.  Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells 
BMC Microbiology  2014;14:126.
Background
Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized.
Results
We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs.
Conclusions
It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge.
doi:10.1186/1471-2180-14-126
PMCID: PMC4035899  PMID: 24886142
Lactobacillus rhamnosus; Poly(I:C); Antiviral immunity; PIE cells; Intestinal antigen presenting cells; TLR2
3.  Dietary Supplementation with Lactobacilli Improves Emergency Granulopoiesis in Protein-Malnourished Mice and Enhances Respiratory Innate Immune Response 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(4):e90227.
This work studied the effect of protein malnutrition on the hemato-immune response to the respiratory challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae and evaluated whether the dietary recovery with a probiotic strain has a beneficial effect in that response. Three important conclusions can be inferred from the results presented in this work: a) protein-malnutrition significantly impairs the emergency myelopoiesis induced by the generation of the innate immune response against pneumococcal infection; b) repletion of malnourished mice with treatments including nasally or orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 are able to significantly accelerate the recovery of granulopoiesis and improve innate immunity and; c) the immunological mechanisms involved in the protective effect of immunobiotics vary according to the route of administration. The study demonstrated that dietary recovery of malnourished mice with oral or nasal administration of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 improves emergency granulopoiesis and that CXCR4/CXCR12 signaling would be involved in this effect. Then, the results summarized here are a starting point for future research and open up broad prospects for future applications of probiotics in the recovery of immunocompromised malnourished hosts.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090227
PMCID: PMC3972161  PMID: 24691464
4.  Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, an Immunobiotic Strain Used in Social Food Programs in Argentina 
Genome Announcements  2013;1(4):e00627-13.
We report the draft genome sequence of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain CRL1505. This new probiotic strain has been included into official Nutritional Programs in Argentina. The draft genome sequence is composed of 3,417,633 bp with 3,327 coding sequences.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.00627-13
PMCID: PMC3744685  PMID: 23950129
5.  Orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus modulates the respiratory immune response triggered by the viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C) 
BMC Immunology  2012;13:53.
Background
Some studies have shown that probiotics, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505, had the potential to beneficially modulate the outcome of certain bacterial and viral respiratory infections. However, these studies did not determine the mechanism(s) by which probiotics contribute to host defense against respiratory viruses.
Results
In this work we demonstrated that orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr1505) was able to increase the levels of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-6 in the respiratory tract and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells. To mimic the pro-inflammatory and physiopathological consecuences of RNA viral infections in the lung, we used an experimental model of lung inflammation based on the administration of the artificial viral pathogen-associated molecular pattern poly(I:C). Nasal administration of poly(I:C) to mice induced a marked impairment of lung function that was accompanied by the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and inflammatory cell recruitment into the airways. The preventive administration of Lr1505 reduced lung injuries and the production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 in the respiratory tract after the challenge with poly(I:C). Moreover, Lr1505 induced a significant increase in lung and serum IL-10. We also observed that Lr1505 was able to increase respiratory IFN-γ levels and the number of lung CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells after poly(I:C) challenge. Moreover, higher numbers of both CD103+ and CD11bhigh dendritic cells and increased expression of MHC-II, IL-12 and IFN-γ in these cell populations were found in lungs of Lr1505-treated mice. Therefore, Lr1505 treatment would beneficially regulate the balance between pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-10, allowing an effective inflammatory response against infection and avoiding tissue damage.
Conclusions
Results showed that Lr1505 would induce a mobilization of cells from intestine and changes in cytokine profile that would be able to beneficially modulate the respiratory mucosal immunity. Although deeper studies are needed using challenges with respiratory viruses, the results in this study suggest that Lr1505, a potent inducer of antiviral cytokines, may be useful as a prophylactic agent to control respiratory virus infection.
doi:10.1186/1471-2172-13-53
PMCID: PMC3460727  PMID: 22989047
L. rhamnosus CRL1505; Poly(I:C); Antiviral immunity; Respiratory tract
6.  Dietary Supplementation with Probiotics Improves Hematopoiesis in Malnourished Mice 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(2):e31171.
Background
Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr) administered during the repletion of immunocompromised-malnourished mice improves the resistance against intestinal and respiratory infections. This effect is associated with an increase in the number and functionality of immune cells, indicating that Lr could have some influence on myeloid and lymphoid cell production and maturation.
Objective
This study analyzed the extent of the damage caused by malnutrition on myeloid and lymphoid cell development in the spleen and bone marrow (BM). We also evaluated the impact of immunobiotics on the recovery of hematopoiesis affected in malnourished mice.
Methods
Protein malnourished mice were fed on a balanced conventional diet for 7 or 14 consecutive d with or without supplemental Lr or fermented goat's milk (FGM). Malnourished mice and well-nourished mice were used as controls. Histological and flow cytometry studies were carried out in BM and spleen to study myeloid and lymphoid cells.
Results
Malnutrition induced quantitative alterations in spleen B and T cells; however, no alteration was observed in the ability of splenic B cells to produce immunoglobulins after challenge with LPS or CpG. The analysis of BM B cell subsets based on B220, CD24, IgM and IgD expression showed that malnutrition affected B cell development. In addition, BM myeloid cells decreased in malnourished mice. On the contrary, protein deprivation increased BM T cell number. These alterations were reverted with Lr or FGM repletion treatments since normal numbers of BM myeloid, T and B cells were observed in these groups.
Conclusions
Protein malnutrition significantly alters B cell development in BM. The treatment of malnourished mice with L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce a recovery of B cells that would explain its ability to increase immunity against infections. This work highlights the possibility of using immunobiotics to accelerate the recovery of lymphopoyesis in immunocompromised-malnourished hosts.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031171
PMCID: PMC3275617  PMID: 22347448

Results 1-6 (6)