PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-9 (9)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
1.  Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae strain SA20-06, a fish pathogen associated to meningoencephalitis outbreaks 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2013;8(2):188-197.
Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B; GBS) is the causative agent of meningoencephalitis in fish, mastitis in cows, and neonatal sepsis in humans. Meningoencephalitis is a major health problem for tilapia farming and is responsible for high economic losses worldwide. Despite its importance, the genomic characteristics and the main molecular mechanisms involved in virulence of S. agalactiae isolated from fish are still poorly understood. Here, we present the genomic features of the 1,820,886 bp long complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SA20-06 isolated from a meningoencephalitis outbreak in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) from Brazil, and its annotation, consisting of 1,710 protein-coding genes (excluding pseudogenes), 7 rRNA operons, 79 tRNA genes and 62 pseudogenes.
doi:10.4056/sigs.3687314
PMCID: PMC3746423  PMID: 23991251
Streptococcus agalactiae; fish pathogen; genome sequencing
2.  Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain Cp162, Isolated from Camel 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(20):5718-5719.
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a pathogen of great veterinary and economic importance, since it affects livestock, mainly sheep and goats, worldwide, together with reports of its presence in camels in several Arabic, Asiatic, and East and West African countries, as well as Australia. In this article, we report the genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain Cp162, collected from the external neck abscess of a camel in the United Kingdom.
doi:10.1128/JB.01373-12
PMCID: PMC3458653  PMID: 23012291
3.  Complete Genome Sequences of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strains 3/99-5 and 42/02-A, Isolated from Sheep in Scotland and Australia, Respectively 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(17):4736-4737.
Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of two ovine-pathogenic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates: strain 3/99-5, which represents the first C. pseudotuberculosis genome originating from the United Kingdom, and 42/02-A, the second from Australia. These genome sequences will contribute to the objective of determining the global pan-genome of this bacterium.
doi:10.1128/JB.00918-12
PMCID: PMC3415504  PMID: 22887652
4.  Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain 1/06-A, Isolated from a Horse in North America 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(16):4476.
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes disease in several animal species, although distinct biovars exist that appear to be restricted to specific hosts. In order to facilitate a better understanding of the differences between biovars, we report here the complete genome sequence of the equine pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1/06-A.
doi:10.1128/JB.00922-12
PMCID: PMC3416248  PMID: 22843601
5.  The Pan-Genome of the Animal Pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Reveals Differences in Genome Plasticity between the Biovar ovis and equi Strains 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e53818.
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of several infectious and contagious chronic diseases, including caseous lymphadenitis, ulcerative lymphangitis, mastitis, and edematous skin disease, in a broad spectrum of hosts. In addition, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infections pose a rising worldwide economic problem in ruminants. The complete genome sequences of 15 C. pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from different hosts and countries were comparatively analyzed using a pan-genomic strategy. Phylogenomic, pan-genomic, core genomic, and singleton analyses revealed close relationships among pathogenic corynebacteria, the clonal-like behavior of C. pseudotuberculosis and slow increases in the sizes of pan-genomes. According to extrapolations based on the pan-genomes, core genomes and singletons, the C. pseudotuberculosis biovar ovis shows a more clonal-like behavior than the C. pseudotuberculosis biovar equi. Most of the variable genes of the biovar ovis strains were acquired in a block through horizontal gene transfer and are highly conserved, whereas the biovar equi strains contain great variability, both intra- and inter-biovar, in the 16 detected pathogenicity islands (PAIs). With respect to the gene content of the PAIs, the most interesting finding is the high similarity of the pilus genes in the biovar ovis strains compared with the great variability of these genes in the biovar equi strains. Concluding, the polymerization of complete pilus structures in biovar ovis could be responsible for a remarkable ability of these strains to spread throughout host tissues and penetrate cells to live intracellularly, in contrast with the biovar equi, which rarely attacks visceral organs. Intracellularly, the biovar ovis strains are expected to have less contact with other organisms than the biovar equi strains, thereby explaining the significant clonal-like behavior of the biovar ovis strains.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053818
PMCID: PMC3544762  PMID: 23342011
6.  Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain Cp267, Isolated from a Llama 
Journal of Bacteriology  2012;194(13):3567-3568.
In this work we report the genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 267, isolated from a llama. This pathogen is of great veterinary and economic importance, as it is the cause of caseous lymphadenitis in several livestock species around the world and causes significant losses due to the high cost of treatment.
doi:10.1128/JB.00461-12
PMCID: PMC3434722  PMID: 22689248
7.  Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar ovis strain P54B96 isolated from antelope in South Africa obtained by rapid next generation sequencing technology 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2012;7(2):189-199.
The Actinobacteria, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain P54B96, a nonmotile, non-sporulating and a mesophile bacterium, was isolated from liver, lung and mediastinal lymph node lesions in an antelope from South Africa. This strain is interesting in the sense that it has been found together with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) which could nevertheless play a role in the lesion formation. In this work, we describe a set of features of C. pseudotuberculosis P54B96, together with the details of the complete genome sequence and annotation. The genome comprises of 2.34 Mbp long, single circular genome with 2,084 protein-coding genes, 12 rRNA, 49 tRNA and 62 pseudogenes and a G+C content of 52.19%. The analysis of the genome sequence provides means to better understanding the molecular and genetic basis of virulence of this bacterium, enabling a detailed investigation of its pathogenesis.
doi:10.4056/sigs.3066455
PMCID: PMC3569390  PMID: 23408795
s: biovar ovis; Gram-positive pathogen; caseous lymphadenitis/cheesy gland disease; liver lesion; Antelope; genome sequencing; Ion Torrent
8.  The Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in silico predicted pan-exoproteome 
BMC Genomics  2012;13(Suppl 5):S6.
Background
Pan-genomic studies aim, for instance, at defining the core, dispensable and unique genes within a species. A pan-genomics study for vaccine design tries to assess the best candidates for a vaccine against a specific pathogen. In this context, rather than studying genes predicted to be exported in a single genome, with pan-genomics it is possible to study genes present in different strains within the same species, such as virulence factors. The target organism of this pan-genomic work here presented is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the etiologic agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in goat and sheep, which causes significant economic losses in those herds around the world. Currently, only a few antigens against CLA are known as being the basis of commercial and still ineffective vaccines. In this regard, the here presented work analyses, in silico, five C. pseudotuberculosis genomes and gathers data to predict common exported proteins in all five genomes. These candidates were also compared to two recent C. pseudotuberculosis in vitro exoproteome results.
Results
The complete genome of five C. pseudotuberculosis strains (1002, C231, I19, FRC41 and PAT10) were submitted to pan-genomics analysis, yielding 306, 59 and 12 gene sets, respectively, representing the core, dispensable and unique in silico predicted exported pan-genomes. These sets bear 150 genes classified as secreted (SEC) and 227 as potentially surface exposed (PSE). Our findings suggest that the main C. pseudotuberculosis in vitro exoproteome could be greater, appended by a fraction of the 35 proteins formerly predicted as making part of the variant in vitro exoproteome. These genomes were manually curated for correct methionine initiation and redeposited with a total of 1885 homogenized genes.
Conclusions
The in silico prediction of exported proteins has allowed to define a list of putative vaccine candidate genes present in all five complete C. pseudotuberculosis genomes. Moreover, it has also been possible to define the in silico predicted dispensable and unique C. pseudotuberculosis exported proteins. These results provide in silico evidence to further guide experiments in the areas of vaccines, diagnosis and drugs. The work here presented is the first whole C. pseudotuberculosis in silico predicted pan-exoproteome completed till today.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-13-S5-S6
PMCID: PMC3476999  PMID: 23095951
9.  Streptococcus iniae outbreaks in Brazilian Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L:) farms 
Brazilian Journal of Microbiology  2012;43(2):576-580.
This is the first report of outbreaks of Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia farms in South America. Seven isolates were identified by biochemical, serological and molecular tests. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences showed 100% similarity with S. iniae ATCC 29178 and two distinct PFGE patterns were observed for Brazilian isolates.
doi:10.1590/S1517-83822012000200019
PMCID: PMC3768829  PMID: 24031866
Brazil; infection; MIC; PFGE; phylogenetic analysis; tilapia

Results 1-9 (9)