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1.  Emergency double balloon enteroscopy: a feasible and promising diagnostic as well as possible therapeutic option in recurrent midgut bleeding 
BMJ Case Reports  2011;2011:bcr0620103068.
Gastrointestinal (GI) tract bleeding, in particular originating within the long segment of the small intestine, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The authors describe the potential utility of emergency double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) for small bowel bleeding. An elderly woman was admitted because of a hypertensive crisis to the medical department of a regional hospital. Her medical history was significant for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) abuse. While in hospital she had massive obscure GI bleeding. Upper GI endoscopy and colonoscopy for recurrent bleeding showed only thrombotic residuals in two sigmoid diverticuli, which led to segmental resection of the sigmoid colon. However, postoperatively, bleeding recurred leading to transfer to our university hospital. Immediate angiography only revealed a vascular malformation at the upper jejunum but no ongoing bleeding. Subsequent emergency DBE detected an oozing jejunal ulcer, which was coagulated using a argon beamer. Because of recurrent falls in haemoglobin with the need for repeated transfusion, the patient underwent surgical reintervention including segmental resection of the ulcerated upper jejunum with subsequent end-to-end anastomosis. Histopathology revealed NSAID-induced ulcerous jejunopathy. Postoperatively, there was no further bleeding and the patient was discharged home in a stable condition. In conclusion, this is one of the first reports of successful emergency use of DBE in a case of recurrent and occult bleeding within the small bowel which successfully located the source of bleeding and facilitated successful superficial ulcer coagulation with an argon beamer to prevent further bleeding.
doi:10.1136/bcr.06.2010.3068
PMCID: PMC3070338  PMID: 22700075
2.  Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease 
BMC Gastroenterology  2012;12:128.
Background
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD.
Methods
Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)].
Results
Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and −2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD.
Conclusions
Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD.
doi:10.1186/1471-230X-12-128
PMCID: PMC3503771  PMID: 22994974
Gastroesophageal reflux disease; Tight junction; Claudins; Esophagitis; Inflammation

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