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1.  Impact of newly diagnosed abnormal glucose regulation on long-term prognosis in low risk patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: A follow-up study 
Background
Patients with acute myocardial infarction and newly detected abnormal glucose regulation have been shown to have a less favourable prognosis compared to patients with normal glucose regulation. The importance and timing of oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes is uncertain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of abnormal glucose regulation classified by an OGTT in-hospital and at three-month follow-up on clinical outcome in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without known diabetes.
Methods
Patients (n = 224, age 58 years) with a primary percutanous coronary intervention (PCI) treated STEMI were followed for clinical events (all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial re-infarction, recurrent ischemia causing hospital admission, and stroke). The patients were classified by a standardised 75 g OGTT at two time points, first, at a median time of 16.5 hours after hospital admission, then at three-month follow-up. Based on the OGTT results, the patients were categorised according to the WHO criteria and the term abnormal glucose regulation was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes.
Results
The number of patients diagnosed with abnormal glucose regulation in-hospital and at three-month was 105 (47%) and 50 (25%), respectively. During the follow up time of (median) 33 (27, 39) months, 58 (25.9%) patients experienced a new clinical event. There were six deaths, 15 non-fatal re-infarction, 33 recurrent ischemia, and four strokes. Kaplan-Meier analysis of survival free of composite end-points showed similar results in patients with abnormal and normal glucose regulation, both when classified in-hospital (p = 0.4) and re-classified three months later (p = 0.3).
Conclusions
Patients with a primary PCI treated STEMI, without previously known diabetes, appear to have an excellent long-term prognosis, independent of the glucometabolic state classified by an OGTT in-hospital or at three-month follow-up.
Trial registration
The trial is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00926133.
doi:10.1186/1472-6823-11-14
PMCID: PMC3173358  PMID: 21801387
2.  Cardiac magnetic resonance visualizes acute and chronic myocardial injuries in myocarditis 
Our objective was to evaluate the ability of CMR to visualize myocardial injuries over the course of myocarditis. We studied 42 patients (39 males, 3 females; age 37 ± 14 years) with myocarditis during the acute phase and after 12 ± 9 months. CMR included function analyses, T2-weighted imaging (T2 ratio), T1-weighted imaging before and after i.v. gadolinium injection (global relative enhancement; gRE), and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). In the acute phase, the T2 ratio was elevated in 57%, gRE in 31%, and LGE was present in 64% of the patients. In 32 patients (76%) were any two (or more) out of three sequences abnormal. At follow-up, there was an increase in ejection fraction (57.4 ± 11.9% vs. 61.4 ± 7.6; P < 0.05) while both T2 ratio (2.04 ± 0.32 vs. 1.70 ± 0.28; P < 0.001) and gRE (4.07 ± 1.63 vs. 3.11 ± 1.22; P < 0.05) significantly decreased. The LGE persisted in 10 patients. Dilated cardiomyopathy was present in 3 patients and 4 patients received a defibrillator or a pacemaker. A comprehensive CMR approach is a useful tool to visualize myocardial tissue injuries over the course of myocarditis. CMR may help to differentiate acute from healed myocarditis, and add information for the differential diagnoses.
doi:10.1007/s10554-011-9812-7
PMCID: PMC3288366  PMID: 21347598
Myocarditis; Coronary angiography; Cardiac magnetic resonance; Myocardial injury; Differential diagnosis
3.  Increased levels of CRP and MCP-1 are associated with previously unknown abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute STEMI: a cohort study 
Background
Inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes and some inflammatory markers may also predict the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were to assess a potential association between circulating levels of inflammatory markers and hyperglycaemia measured during an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known diabetes, and to determine whether circulating levels of inflammatory markers measured early after an acute STEMI, were associated with the presence of abnormal glucose regulation classified by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at three-month follow-up in the same cohort.
Methods
Inflammatory markers were measured in fasting blood samples from 201 stable patients at a median time of 16.5 hours after a primary percutanous coronary intervention (PCI). Three months later the patients performed a standardised OGTT. The term abnormal glucose regulation was defined as the sum of the three pathological glucose categories classified according to the WHO criteria (patients with abnormal glucose regulation, n = 50).
Results
No association was found between inflammatory markers and hyperglycaemia measured during the acute STEMI. However, the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) measured in-hospital were higher in patients classified three months later as having abnormal compared to normal glucose regulation (p = 0.031 and p = 0.016, respectively). High levels of CRP (≥ 75 percentiles (33.13 mg/L)) and MCP-1 (≥ 25 percentiles (190 ug/mL)) were associated with abnormal glucose regulation with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95% CI 1.5, 6.8) and 7.6 (95% CI 1.7, 34.2), respectively.
Conclusion
Elevated levels of CRP and MCP-1 measured in patients early after an acute STEMI were associated with abnormal glucose regulation classified by an OGTT at three-month follow-up. No significant associations were observed between inflammatory markers and hyperglycaemia measured during the acute STEMI.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-9-47
PMCID: PMC2940874  PMID: 20809989
4.  Abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute ST- elevation myocardial infarction-a cohort study on 224 patients 
Background
A high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and unknown type 2-diabetes in patients with coronary heart disease and no previous diagnosis of diabetes have been reported. The aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) 3 months after an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients without known glucometabolic disturbance, to evaluate the reliability of a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed very early after an acute STEMI to predict the presence of AGR at 3 months, and to study other potential predictors measured in-hospital for AGR at 3 months.
Methods
This was an observational cohort study prospectively enrolling 224 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. An OGTT was performed very early after an acute STEMI and was repeated in 200 patients after 3 months. We summarised the exact agreement observed, and assessed the observed reproducibility of the OGTTs performed in-hospital and at follow up. The patients were classified into glucometabolic categories defined according to the World Health Organisation criteria. AGR was defined as the sum of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2-diabetes.
Results
The prevalence of AGR at three months was 24.9% (95% CI 19.1, 31.4%), reduced from 46.9% (95% CI 40.2, 53.6) when measured in-hospital. Only, 108 of 201 (54%) patients remained in the same glucometabolic category after a repeated OGTT. High levels of HbA1c and admission plasma glucose in-hospital significantly predicted AGR at 3 months (p < 0.001, p = 0.040, respectively), and fasting plasma glucose was predictive when patients with large myocardial infarction were excluded (p < 0.001).
Conclusion
The prevalence of AGR in STEMI patients was lower than expected. HbA1c, admission plasma glucose and fasting plasma glucose measured in-hospital seem to be useful as early markers of longstanding glucometabolic disturbance. An OGTT performed very early after a STEMI did not provide reliable information on long-term glucometabolic state and should probably not be recommended.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-8-6
PMCID: PMC2646717  PMID: 19183453

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