PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Polygonum viviparum L. induces vasorelaxation in the rat thoracic aorta via activation of nitric oxide synthase in endothelial cells 
Background
In the past several decades, Polygonum viviparum L. (PV) was reported to have antibacterial, antiulcer, antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and antiarthritic properties. The anti-inflammatory pathway was recently elucidated through cytosolic nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 protein expression. PV is a perennial herb and widely distributed in high-elevation mountain regions, such as the Tibetan Plateau. In Tibetan traditional medicine, PV is usually used to boost the blood circulation to dissipate blood stasis. Therefore, this study focused on how PV improves the vascular circulation and acts on vascular tissues.
Methods
In this study, we isolated aortas from Sprague-Dawley rats (male, weight about 250 ~ 350 g), and detected the effects of PV on phenylephrine (PE)-induced contraction and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) formation using aortic rings. In addition, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exam nitric oxygen (NO) synthase (NOS) activity by directly measuring NO production in the culture medium. Endothelial (e) NOS phosphorylation, and cytosolic Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were measured using a Western blot analysis.
Results
PV dose-dependently relaxed PE-induced contractions in endothelial-intact but not -denuded aorta. The concentration to produce 50% relaxation was 22.04 ± 1.77 μg/ml. PV-induced vasorelaxation was markedly blocked by pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an NOS inhibitor, methylene blue (MB), a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, and hemoglobin, an NO scavenger. PV increased cGMP formation; however, this effect was also suppressed by co-pretreatment with l-NAME, MB, hemoglobin, and Ca2+-free medium. In HUVECs, PV increased NO formation, which was greatly attenuated by NOS inhibitors (L-NAME and L-NMMA) and by removing extracellular Ca2+ and chelating intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA-AM. In addition, PV promoted eNOS phosphorylation, Nrf2 degradation, and HO-1 protein expression according to a Western blot analysis.
Conclusions
The results suggest that PV possesses vasorelaxing action in an endothelium-dependent manner and works through activating Ca2+/calmodulin- dependent NO synthesis; when NO is released and then transferred to smooth muscle cells, NO activates guanylyl cyclase and increases cGMP formation, ultimately resulting in vasorelaxation. Thus, PV can be considered for application as a potential therapeutic approach for vascular-associated disorders.
doi:10.1186/1472-6882-14-150
PMCID: PMC4030279  PMID: 24885446
Polygonum viviparum L; Aorta; Vasorelaxation; cGMP; eNOS; HUVECs
2.  Brazilin Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Vascular Inflammation via Inhibiting ROS and CAMs Production in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells 
BioMed Research International  2014;2014:403703.
Vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Recent studies have shown that brazilin exhibits antihepatotoxic, antiplatelet, cancer preventive, or anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, we investigated whether brazilin suppresses vascular inflammatory process induced by high glucose (HG) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HG induced nitrite production, lipid peroxidation, and intracellular reactive oxygen species formation in HUVEC cells, which was reversed by brazilin. Western blot analysis revealed that brazilin markedly inhibited HG-induced phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Besides, we investigated the effects of brazilin on the MAPK signal transduction pathway because MAPK families are associated with vascular inflammation under stress. Brazilin blocked HG-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and transcription factor NF-κB. Furthermore, brazilin concentration-dependently attenuated cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) expression induced by various concentrations of HG in HUVEC. Taken together, the present data suggested that brazilin could suppress high glucose-induced vascular inflammatory process, which may be closely related with the inhibition of oxidative stress, CAMs expression, and NF-κB activation in HUVEC. Our findings may highlight a new therapeutic intervention for the prevention of vascular diseases.
doi:10.1155/2014/403703
PMCID: PMC3955648  PMID: 24716195
3.  Protective effect of guggulsterone against cardiomyocyte injury induced by doxorubicin in vitro 
Background
Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective antineoplastic drug; however, clinical use of DOX is limited by its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. It is well known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the pathological process of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. For this study, we evaluated the protective effects of guggulsterone (GS), a steroid obtained from myrrh, to determine its preliminary mechanisms in defending against DOX-induced cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells.
Methods
In this study, we used a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release measurements, and Hoechst 33258 staining to evaluate the protective effect of GS against DOX-induced cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells. In addition, we observed the immunofluorescence of intracellular ROS and measured lipid peroxidation, caspase-3 activity, and apoptosis-related proteins by using Western blotting.
Results
The MTT assay and LDH release showed that treatment using GS (1–30 μM) did not cause cytotoxicity. Furthermore, GS inhibited DOX (1 μM)-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Hoechst 33258 staining showed that GS significantly reduced DOX-induced apoptosis and cell death. Using GS at a dose of 10–30 μM significantly reduced intracellular ROS and the formation of MDA in the supernatant of DOX-treated H9C2 cells and suppressed caspase-3 activity to reference levels. In immunoblot analysis, pretreatment using GS significantly reversed DOX-induced decrease of PARP, caspase-3 and bcl-2, and increase of bax, cytochrome C release, cleaved-PARP and cleaved-caspase-3. In addition, the properties of DOX-induced cancer cell (DLD-1 cells) death did not interfere when combined GS and DOX.
Conclusion
These data provide considerable evidence that GS could serve as a novel cardioprotective agent against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity.
doi:10.1186/1472-6882-12-138
PMCID: PMC3493356  PMID: 22920231
Guggulsterone; Doxorubicin; Cardiotoxicity; Cytokines; Reactive oxygen species

Results 1-3 (3)