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author:("Relan, vanden")
1.  Phenotypes and Karyotypes of Human Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Lines 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(3):e58132.
Background
Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma.
Methods
Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs.
Results
Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30–72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5–17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions.
Conclusion
These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of mesothelioma during maintenance in artificial culture systems. These characteristics support their potential as in vitro model systems for studying cellular, molecular and genetic aspects of mesothelioma.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0058132
PMCID: PMC3597627  PMID: 23516439
2.  Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas 
BMC Cancer  2012;12:428.
Background
The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE) is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE.
Methods
We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index)] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA.
Results
Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas) and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p<0.001). Cytology had a sensitivity of 55% in diagnosing MPE. If cytology and pleural fluid DNA integrity index were considered together, they exhibited 81% sensitivity and 87% specificity in distinguishing benign and malignant effusions. In cytology-negative pleural effusions (35 MPE and 28 benign effusions), elevated pleural fluid DNA integrity index had an 81% positive predictive value in detecting MPEs. In the detection of mesothelioma, at a specificity of 90%, pleural fluid DNA integrity index had similar sensitivity to pleural fluid and serum mesothelin (75% each respectively).
Conclusion
Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-12-428
PMCID: PMC3495778  PMID: 23009708
Malignant pleural effusions; Mesothelioma; Lung cancer; DNA integrity index; Mesothelin
3.  Whole genome sequencing for lung cancer 
Journal of Thoracic Disease  2012;4(2):155-163.
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality globally, and carries a dismal prognosis. Improved understanding of the biology of cancer is required to improve patient outcomes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool for whole genome characterisation, enabling comprehensive examination of somatic mutations that drive oncogenesis. Most NGS methods are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of platform-specific DNA fragment libraries, which are then sequenced. These techniques are well suited to high-throughput sequencing and are able to detect the full spectrum of genomic changes present in cancer. However, they require considerable investments in time, laboratory infrastructure, computational analysis and bioinformatic support. Next-generation sequencing has been applied to studies of the whole genome, exome, transcriptome and epigenome, and is changing the paradigm of lung cancer research and patient care. The results of this new technology will transform current knowledge of oncogenic pathways and provide molecular targets of use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Somatic mutations in lung cancer have already been identified by NGS, and large scale genomic studies are underway. Personalised treatment strategies will improve care for those likely to benefit from available therapies, while sparing others the expense and morbidity of futile intervention. Organisational, computational and bioinformatic challenges of NGS are driving technological advances as well as raising ethical issues relating to informed consent and data release. Differentiation between driver and passenger mutations requires careful interpretation of sequencing data. Challenges in the interpretation of results arise from the types of specimens used for DNA extraction, sample processing techniques and tumour content. Tumour heterogeneity can reduce power to detect mutations implicated in oncogenesis. Next-generation sequencing will facilitate investigation of the biological and clinical implications of such variation. These techniques can now be applied to single cells and free circulating DNA, and possibly in the future to DNA obtained from body fluids and from subpopulations of tumour. As costs reduce, and speed and processing accuracy increase, NGS technology will become increasingly accessible to researchers and clinicians, with the ultimate goal of improving the care of patients with lung cancer.
doi:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2012.02.01
PMCID: PMC3378223  PMID: 22833821
High-throughput nucleotide sequencing; DNA sequence analysis; lung neoplasms; non-small cell lung carcinoma; small cell lung carcinoma

Results 1-3 (3)