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1.  Laparotomic Myomectomy in the 16th Week of Pregnancy: A Case Report 
Myomectomy is rarely performed during an ongoing pregnancy because of fear of miscarriage and the risk of an uncontrolled haemorrhage necessitating a hysterectomy. In cases where myomectomy is undertaken, most are performed at the time of cesarean section or with a laparoscopic approach. We report a case of a successful laparotomic myomectomy in the 16th week of pregnancy. A 35-year-old primigravida was admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain and hydronephrosis (serum creatinine 1.6 mg/dL). Imaging revealed a large implant myoma compressing the bladder, ureters, rectus, and gestational chamber and causing hydronephrosis. Laparotomic myomectomy was successfully performed and pregnancy continued uneventfully until the 38th week when a cesarean section was performed. Surgical management of myomas during pregnancy is worth evaluating in well-selected and highly symptomatic cases.
doi:10.1155/2014/154347
PMCID: PMC3970342  PMID: 24716028
2.  First case of isolated vaginal metastasis from breast cancer treated by surgery 
BMC Cancer  2012;12:479.
Background
Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in developed countries. This neoplasm frequently relapses at distant sites such as bone, lung, pleura, brain and liver but rarely in the lower female genital tract.
Case presentation
We present the first case of isolated vaginal breast cancer metastasis and its surgical treatment.
Conclusion
This case report focuses on the importance of an accurate genital tract examination as part of regular follow up in breast cancer survivors. Indeed, after this experience we feel that surgery could be considered a valid option for the treatment of an isolated vaginal metastasis.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-12-479
PMCID: PMC3495020  PMID: 23075305
Breast cancer; Radical surgery; Vaginal metastasis
3.  Monoclonal Antibodies in Gynecological Cancer: A Critical Point of View 
During the last decades, several improvements in treating gynecological malignancies have been achieved. In particular, target therapies, mostly monoclonal antibodies, have emerged as an attractive option for the treatment of these malignancies. In fact, various molecular-targeted agents have been developed for a variety of malignancies with the objective to interfere with a precise tumor associated receptor, essential for cancer cell survival or proliferation, blocking its function, of the cancer cells. Alternatively, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to block immune suppression or enhance functions of immune effector cells. So far, several monoclonal antibodies have been tested for clinical efficacy for the treatment of gynecological cancers. Antibodies against Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been used in different neoplasms such as ovarian and cervical cancer. Catumazumab, a bivalent antibody against CD3 and EpCAM, is effective in the treatment of neoplastic ascites. Other antibodies are peculiar for specific cancer-associated antigen such as Oregovomab against CA125 or Farletuzumab against the folate receptor. Here we describe the preclinical and clinical experience gained up to now with monoclonal antibodies in tumors of the female genital tract and trace future therapeutic and research venues.
doi:10.1155/2011/890758
PMCID: PMC3253445  PMID: 22235224

Results 1-3 (3)