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1.  Structural and Functional Characterization of an Orphan ATP-Binding Cassette ATPase Involved in Manganese Utilization and Tolerance in Leptospira spp. 
Journal of Bacteriology  2013;195(24):5583-5591.
Pathogenic Leptospira species are the etiological agents of the widespread zoonotic disease leptospirosis. Most organisms, including Leptospira, require divalent cations for proper growth, but because of their high reactivity, these metals are toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, bacteria have acquired strategies to maintain metal homeostasis, such as metal import and efflux. By screening Leptospira biflexa transposon mutants for their ability to use Mn2+, we have identified a gene encoding a putative orphan ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ATPase of unknown function. Inactivation of this gene in both L. biflexa and L. interrogans strains led to mutants unable to grow in medium in which iron was replaced by Mn2+, suggesting an involvement of this ABC ATPase in divalent cation uptake. A mutation in this ATPase-coding gene increased susceptibility to Mn2+ toxicity. Recombinant ABC ATPase of the pathogen L. interrogans exhibited Mg2+-dependent ATPase activity involving a P-loop motif. The structure of this ATPase was solved from a crystal containing two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Each monomer adopted a canonical two-subdomain organization of the ABC ATPase fold with an α/β subdomain containing the Walker motifs and an α subdomain containing the ABC signature motif (LSSGE). The two monomers were arranged in a head-to-tail orientation, forming a V-shaped particle with all the conserved ABC motifs at the dimer interface, similar to functional ABC ATPases. These results provide the first structural and functional characterization of a leptospiral ABC ATPase.
doi:10.1128/JB.00915-13
PMCID: PMC3889601  PMID: 24123817
2.  Identified members of the Streptomyces lividans AdpA regulon involved in differentiation and secondary metabolism 
BMC Microbiology  2014;14:81.
Background
AdpA is a key transcriptional regulator involved in the complex growth cycle of Streptomyces. Streptomyces are Gram-positive bacteria well-known for their production of secondary metabolites and antibiotics. Most work on AdpA has been in S. griseus, and little is known about the pathways it controls in other Streptomyces spp. We recently discovered interplay between ClpP peptidases and AdpA in S. lividans. Here, we report the identification of genes directly regulated by AdpA in S. lividans.
Results
Microarray experiments revealed that the expression of hundreds of genes was affected in a S. lividans adpA mutant during early stationary phase cultures in YEME liquid medium. We studied the expression of the S. lividans AdpA-regulated genes by quantitative real-time PCR analysis after various times of growth. In silico analysis revealed the presence of potential AdpA-binding sites upstream from these genes; electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that AdpA binds directly to their promoter regions. This work identifies new pathways directly controlled by AdpA and that are involved in S. lividans development (ramR, SLI7885 also known as hyaS and SLI6586), and primary (SLI0755-SLI0754 encoding CYP105D5 and Fdx4) or secondary (cchA, cchB, and hyaS) metabolism.
Conclusions
We characterised six S. lividans AdpA-dependent genes whose expression is directly activated by this pleiotropic regulator. Several of these genes are orthologous to bldA-dependent genes in S. coelicolor. Furthermore, in silico analysis suggests that over hundred genes may be directly activated or repressed by S. lividans AdpA, although few have been described as being part of any Streptomyces AdpA regulons. This study increases the number of known AdpA-regulated pathways in Streptomyces spp.
doi:10.1186/1471-2180-14-81
PMCID: PMC4021200  PMID: 24694298
Streptomyces; lividans; Microarrays; AdpA; bldA; ramR; hyaS; CYP105D5; cchB; Coelichelin
3.  Assembly and proteolytic processing of mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2 
BMC Biochemistry  2011;12:61.
Background
Caseinolytic proteases (ClpPs) are barrel-shaped self-compartmentalized peptidases involved in eliminating damaged or short-lived regulatory proteins. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) genome contains two genes coding for putative ClpPs, ClpP1 and ClpP2 respectively, that are likely to play a role in the virulence of the bacterium.
Results
We report the first biochemical characterization of ClpP1 and ClpP2 peptidases from MTB. Both proteins were produced and purified in Escherichia coli. Use of fluorogenic model peptides of diverse specificities failed to show peptidase activity with recombinant mycobacterial ClpP1 or ClpP2. However, we found that ClpP1 had a proteolytic activity responsible for its own cleavage after the Arg8 residue and cleavage of ClpP2 after the Ala12 residue. In addition, we showed that the absence of any peptidase activity toward model peptides was not due to an obstruction of the entry pore by the N-terminal flexible extremity of the proteins, nor to an absolute requirement for the ClpX or ClpC ATPase complex. Finally, we also found that removing the putative propeptides of ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in cleavage of model peptides.
We have also shown that recombinant ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not assemble in the conventional functional tetradecameric form but in lower order oligomeric species ranging from monomers to heptamers. The concomitant presence of both ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in tetradecameric assembly. Deleting the amino-terminal extremity of ClpP1 and ClpP2 (the putative propeptide or entry gate) promoted the assembly in higher order oligomeric species, suggesting that the flexible N-terminal extremity of mycobacterial ClpPs participated in the destabilization of interaction between heptamers.
Conclusion
Despite the conservation of a Ser protease catalytic triad in their primary sequences, mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not have conventional peptidase activity toward peptide models and display an unusual mechanism of self-assembly. Therefore, the mechanism underlying their peptidase and proteolytic activities might differ from that of other ClpP proteolytic complexes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2091-12-61
PMCID: PMC3258218  PMID: 22132756
4.  Production of Recombinant Proteins in the lon-Deficient BL21(DE3) Strain of Escherichia coli in the Absence of the DnaK Chaperone▿ † 
Applied and Environmental Microbiology  2009;75(11):3803-3807.
To eliminate unavoidable contamination of purified recombinant proteins by DnaK, we present a unique approach employing a BL21(DE3) ΔdnaK strain of Escherichia coli. Selected representative purified proteins remained soluble, correctly assembled, and active. This finding establishes DnaK dispensability for protein production in BL21(DE3), which is void of Lon protease, key to eliminating unfolded proteins.
doi:10.1128/AEM.00255-09
PMCID: PMC2687262  PMID: 19346357

Results 1-4 (4)