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1.  Parent Report of Community Psychiatric Comorbid Diagnoses in Autism Spectrum Disorders 
Autism Research and Treatment  2011;2011:405849.
We used a national online registry to examine variation in cumulative prevalence of community diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidity in 4343 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Adjusted multivariate logistic regression models compared influence of individual, family, and geographic factors on cumulative prevalence of parent-reported anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention deficit disorder. Adjusted odds of community-assigned lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were significantly higher with each additional year of life, with increasing autism severity, and with Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder—not otherwise specified compared with autistic disorder. Overall, in this largest study of parent-reported community diagnoses of psychiatric comorbidity, gender, autistic regression, autism severity, and type of ASD all emerged as significant factors correlating with cumulative prevalence. These findings could suggest both underlying trends in actual comorbidity as well as variation in community interpretation and application of comorbid diagnoses in ASD.
doi:10.1155/2011/405849
PMCID: PMC3420588  PMID: 22937248
2.  Factors Affecting Age at Initial Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis in a National Survey 
Autism Research and Treatment  2011;2011:874619.
Entry into early intervention depends on both age of first parent concern (AOC) and age at initial autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis (AOD). Using data collected from a national online registry from 6214 children diagnosed with an ASD between 1994 and 2010 in the US, we analyzed the effect of individual, family, and geographic covariates on AOC and AOD in a multivariate linear regression model with random effects. Overall, no single modifiable factor associated with AOC or AOD emerged but cumulative variation in certain individual- and family-based features, as well as some geographic factors, all contribute to AOC and AOD variation. A multipronged strategy is needed for targeted education and awareness campaigns to maximize outcomes and decrease disparities in ASD care.
doi:10.1155/2011/874619
PMCID: PMC3420379  PMID: 22937257
3.  Mood Disorders in Mothers of Children on the Autism Spectrum Are Associated with Higher Functioning Autism 
Autism Research and Treatment  2012;2012:435646.
Mood disorders occur more frequently in family members of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than in the general population. There may be associations between maternal mood disorder history patterns and specific ASD phenotypes. We therefore examined the relationship between maternal mood disorders and child autism spectrum disorders in 998 mother-child dyads enrolled in a national online autism registry and database. Mothers of children with ASD completed online questionnaires addressing their child's ASD as well as their own mood disorder history. In multivariate logistic regression models of ASD diagnoses, the odds of an Asperger disorder versus autistic disorder diagnosis were higher among those children whose mothers had a lifetime history of bipolar disorder (OR 2.11, CI 1.20, 3.69) or depression (OR 1.62, CI 1.19, 2.19). Further, maternal mood disorder onset before first pregnancy was associated with higher odds (OR 2.35, CI 1.48, 3.73) of an Asperger versus autism diagnosis among this sample of children with ASD. These data suggest that differences in maternal mood disorder history may be associated with ASD phenotype in offspring.
doi:10.1155/2012/435646
PMCID: PMC3426171  PMID: 22934172
4.  Nosocomial Sepsis Risk Score for Preterm Infants in Low-resource Settings 
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics  2009;56(2):82-89.
Sepsis is a leading cause of mortality for neonates in developing countries; however, little research has focused on clinical predictors of nosocomial infection of preterm neonates in the low-resource setting. We sought to validate the only existing feasible score introduced by Singh et al. in 2003 and to create an improved score. In a secondary analysis of daily evaluations of 497 neonates ≤33 weeks gestational age admitted to a tertiary care NICU in Dhaka, Bangladesh, we tested the Singh score and then constructed and internally validated our own bedside predictive score. The Singh score had low sensitivity of 56.6% but good positive predictive value (PPV) of 78.1% in our sample. Our five-sign model requiring at least one clinical sign of infection (apnea, hepatomegaly, jaundice, lethargy and pallor) had an area under the receiver operating characteristic of 0.70, sensitivity of 77.1%, and PPV of 64.9%. Our clinical sepsis score is the first bedside clinical screen exclusively for hospitalized, very premature neonates in a low-resource setting, and warrants external validation.
doi:10.1093/tropej/fmp061
PMCID: PMC3115678  PMID: 19622712
neonate; sepsis; prematurity; very low birth-weight; developing countries; nosocomial
5.  Determining Gestational Age in a Low-resource Setting: Validity of Last Menstrual Period 
The validity of three methods (last menstrual period [LPM], Ballard and Dubowitz scores) for assessment of gestational age for premature infants in a low-resource setting was assessed, using antenatal ultrasound as the gold standard. It was hypothesized that LMP and other methods would perform similarly in determining postnatal gestational age. Concordance analysis was applied to data on 355 neonates of <33 weeks gestational age enrolled in a topical skin-therapy trial in a tertiary-care children's hospital in Bangladesh. The concordance coefficient for LMP, Ballard, and Dubowitz was 0.878, 0.914, and 0.886 respectively. LMP and Ballard underestimated gestational age by one day (±11) and 2.9 days (±7.8) respectively while Dubowitz overestimated gestational age by 3.9 days (±7.1) compared to ultrasound finding. LMP in a low-resource setting was a more reliable measure of gestational age than previously thought for estimation of postnatal gestational age of preterm infants. Ballard and Dubowitz scores are slightly more reliable but require more technical skills to perform. Additional prospective trials are warranted to examine LMP against antenatal ultrasound for primary assessment of neonatal gestational age in other low-resource settings.
PMCID: PMC2761790  PMID: 19507748
Gestational age; Last menstrual period; Neonatal health; Obstetrics; Bangladesh

Results 1-5 (5)