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1.  Interaction of Acetylcholinesterase with Neurexin-1β regulates Glutamatergic Synaptic stability in Hippocampal neurons 
Molecular Brain  2014;7:15.
Background
Excess expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the cortex and hippocampus causes a decrease in the number of glutamatergic synapses and alters the expression of neurexin and neuroligin, trans-synaptic proteins that control synaptic stability. The molecular sequence and three-dimensional structure of AChE are homologous to the corresponding aspects of the ectodomain of neuroligin. This study investigated whether excess AChE interacts physically with neurexin to destabilize glutamatergic synapses.
Results
The results showed that AChE clusters colocalized with neurexin assemblies in the neurites of hippocampal neurons and that AChE co-immunoprecipitated with neurexin from the lysate of these neurons. Moreover, when expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, N-glycosylated AChE co-immunoprecipitated with non-O–glycosylated neurexin-1β, with N-glycosylation of the AChE being required for this co-precipitation to occur. Increasing extracellular AChE decreased the association of neurexin with neuroligin and inhibited neuroligin-induced synaptogenesis. The number and activity of excitatory synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons were reduced by extracellular catalytically inactive AChE.
Conclusions
Excessive glycosylated AChE could competitively disrupt a subset of the neurexin–neuroligin junctions consequently impairing the integrity of glutamatergic synapses. This might serve a molecular mechanism of excessive AChE induced neurodegeneration.
doi:10.1186/1756-6606-7-15
PMCID: PMC3973991  PMID: 24594013
Protein interaction; Glycosylation; Neurodegeneration; Synaptic apoptosis
2.  Iodinated contrast–induced thyrotoxicosis 
doi:10.1503/cmaj.120734
PMCID: PMC3563887  PMID: 23148056
3.  Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) 
G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs), which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.
doi:10.3390/ijms15023003
PMCID: PMC3958896  PMID: 24562329
NMDA receptor; G protein coupled receptor; protein kinase A; protein kinase C; cyclic AMP
4.  Diarylamidines: High potency inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels 
Neuropharmacology  2010;58(7):10.1016/j.neuropharm.2010.01.011.
Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels that are predominantly expressed in the nervous system. ASICs are involved in a number of neurological diseases such as pain, ischemic stroke and multiple sclerosis but limited tools are available to target these channels and provide probes for their physiological functions. Here we report that the anti-protozoal diarylamidines, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), diminazene, hydroxystilbamidine (HSB) and pentamidine potently inhibit ASIC currents in primary cultured hippocampal neurons with apparent affinities of 2.8 µM, 0.3 µM, 1.5 µM and 38 µM, respectively. These four compounds (100 µM) failed to block ENaC channels expressed in oocytes. Sub-maximal concentrations of diminazene also strongly accelerated desensitization of ASIC currents in hippocampal neurons. Diminazene blocked ASIC1a, -1b -2a, and -3 currents expressed in CHO cells with a rank order of potency 1b > 3 > 2a ≥ 1a. Patchdock computational analysis suggested a binding site of diarylamidines on ASICs. This study indicates diarylamidines constitute a novel class of non-amiloride ASIC blockers and suggests that diarylamidines may be developed as therapeutic agents in treatment of ASIC-involved diseases.
doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2010.01.011
PMCID: PMC3846926  PMID: 20114056
ASIC; Diarylamidines; Channel blockers; Pain
5.  Acute 5-HT7 receptor activation increases NMDA-evoked currents and differentially alters NMDA receptor subunit phosphorylation and trafficking in hippocampal neurons 
Molecular Brain  2013;6:24.
Background
N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are regulated by several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as receptor tyrosine kinases. Serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptors are expressed throughout the brain including the thalamus and hippocampus. Long-term (2–24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors promotes the expression of neuroprotective growth factor receptors, including the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors which can protect neurons against NMDA-induced neurotoxicity.
Results
In contrast to long-term activation of 5-HT7 receptors, acute (5 min) treatment of isolated hippocampal neurons with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) enhances NMDA-evoked peak currents and this increase in peak currents is blocked by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970. In hippocampal slices, acute 5-HT7 receptor activation increases NR1 NMDA receptor subunit phosphorylation and differentially alters the phosphorylation state of the NR2B and NR2A subunits. NMDA receptor subunit cell surface expression is also differentially altered by 5-HT7 receptor agonists: NR2B cell surface expression is decreased whereas NR1 and NR2A surface expression are not significantly altered.
Conclusions
In contrast to the negative regulatory effects of long-term activation of 5-HT7 receptors on NMDA receptor signaling, acute activation of 5-HT7 receptors promotes NMDA receptor activity. These findings highlight the potential for temporally differential regulation of NMDA receptors by the 5-HT7 receptor.
doi:10.1186/1756-6606-6-24
PMCID: PMC3661375  PMID: 23672716
5-HT7; NMDA; Hippocampus; Isolated neurons; Phosphorylation; Trafficking
6.  Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704 - A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients with Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas 
Purpose
In RTOG 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity.
Methods and Materials
RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (
Results
RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200
Conclusions
This is the first phase III, multi-center, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased non-hematologic toxicity.
doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.11.039
PMCID: PMC3133855  PMID: 21277694
Radiotherapy; quality assurance; pancreatic adenocarcinoma; adjuvant therapy; chemoradiotherapy
Scientific Reports  2013;3:926.
Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) have emerged as important targets for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has also been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether postsynaptic mGluR2/3 regulate NMDAR function. Activation of mGluR2/3 significantly decreased the ratio of AMPA-to-NMDA excitatory postsynaptic currents at Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapses and enhanced the peak of NMDA-evoked currents in acutely isolated CA1 neurons. The mGluR2/3-mediated potentiation of NMDAR currents was selective for GluN2A-containing NMDARs and was mediated by the Src family kinase Src. Activation of mGluR2/3 inhibited the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway and thereby activated Src by inhibiting its regulatory C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). We suggest a novel model of regulation of NMDARs by Gi/o-coupled receptors whereby inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway via mGluR2/3 activates Src kinase and potentiates GluN2A-containing NMDAR currents. This represents a potentially novel mechanism to correct the hypoglutamatergic state found in schizophrenia.
doi:10.1038/srep00926
PMCID: PMC3558700  PMID: 23378895
American Journal of Epidemiology  2011;174(11):1296-1306.
Greening of vacant urban land may affect health and safety. The authors conducted a decade-long difference-in-differences analysis of the impact of a vacant lot greening program in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on health and safety outcomes. “Before” and “after” outcome differences among treated vacant lots were compared with matched groups of control vacant lots that were eligible but did not receive treatment. Control lots from 2 eligibility pools were randomly selected and matched to treated lots at a 3:1 ratio by city section. Random-effects regression models were fitted, along with alternative models and robustness checks. Across 4 sections of Philadelphia, 4,436 vacant lots totaling over 7.8 million square feet (about 725,000 m2) were greened from 1999 to 2008. Regression-adjusted estimates showed that vacant lot greening was associated with consistent reductions in gun assaults across all 4 sections of the city (P < 0.001) and consistent reductions in vandalism in 1 section of the city (P < 0.001). Regression-adjusted estimates also showed that vacant lot greening was associated with residents’ reporting less stress and more exercise in select sections of the city (P < 0.01). Once greened, vacant lots may reduce certain crimes and promote some aspects of health. Limitations of the current study are discussed. Community-based trials are warranted to further test these findings.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwr273
PMCID: PMC3224254  PMID: 22079788
city planning; crime; geography; urban health; urban renewal; wounds and injuries
Purpose
Lymph node status is an important predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of RTOG 9704, an adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation trial, to determine the influence of lymph node factors-number of positive nodes (NPN), total nodes examined (TNE), and lymph node ratio (LNR-ratio of NPN to TNE)-on OS and disease-free survival (DFS).
Patient and Methods
Eligible patients from RTOG 9704 form the basis of this secondary analysis of lymph node parameters. Actuarial estimates for OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluate associations of NPN, TNE, and LNR with OS and DFS. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were also performed.
Results
There were 538 patients enrolled in the RTOG 9704 trial. Of these, 445 patients were eligible with lymph nodes removed. Overall median NPN was 1 (min-max, 0-18). Increased NPN was associated with worse OS (HR=1.06, p=0.001) and DFS (HR=1.05, p=0.01). In multivariate analyses, both NPN and TNE were associated with OS and DFS. TNE > 12, and >15, were associated with increased OS for all patients, but not for node-negative patients (n =142). Increased LNR was associated with worse OS (HR=1.01, p<0.0001) and DFS (HR=1.006, p=0.002).
Conclusion
In patients who undergo surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation, TNE, NPN, and LNR are associated with OS and DFS. This secondary analysis of a prospective, cooperative group trial supports the influence of these lymph node parameters on outcomes after surgery and adjuvant therapy using contemporary techniques.
doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.07.1993
PMCID: PMC3038247  PMID: 20934270
lymph node; nodal ratio; pancreatic cancer; radiation therapy; pancreaticoduodenectomy
Neurobiology of aging  2005;27(11):1613-1617.
The goal of the present study was to determine if there are global or regionally specific decreases in callosal area in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In addition, this study examined the corpus callosum of healthy older adults who have subjective cognitive complaints (CC) but perform within normal limits on neuropsychological tests. We used a semi-automated procedure to examine the total and regional areas of the corpus callosum in 22 patients with early AD, 28 patients with amnestic MCI, 28 healthy older adults with cognitive complaints, and 50 demographically matched healthy controls (HC). The AD, MCI, and CC groups all showed a significant reduction of the posterior region (isthmus and splenium) relative to healthy controls. The AD group also had a significantly smaller overall callosum than the controls. The demonstration of callosal atrophy in older adults with cognitive complaints suggests that callosal changes occur very early in the dementing process, and that these earliest changes may be too subtle for detection by neuropsychological assessments, including memory tests.
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2005.09.035
PMCID: PMC3482483  PMID: 16271806
Alzheimer’s disease; Mild cognitive impairment; Cognitive complaints; Corpus callosum; Magnetic resonance imaging
Molecular Brain  2012;5:11.
Background
Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in neuronal oxidant defence. Depletion of cellular GSH is observed in neurodegenerative diseases and thereby contributes to the associated oxidative stress and Ca2+ dysregulation. Whether depletion of cellular GSH, associated with neuronal senescence, directly influences Ca2+ permeation pathways is not known. Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca2+ permeable non-selective cation channel expressed in several cell types including hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Moreover, activation of TRPM2 during oxidative stress has been linked to cell death. Importantly, GSH has been reported to inhibit TRPM2 channels, suggesting they may directly contribute to Ca2+ dysregulation associated with neuronal senescence. Herein, we explore the relation between cellular GSH and TRPM2 channel activity in long-term cultures of hippocampal neurons.
Results
In whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings, we observe that TRPM2 current density increases in cultured pyramidal neurons over time in vitro. The observed increase in current density was prevented by treatment with NAC, a precursor to GSH synthesis. Conversely, treatment of cultures maintained for 2 weeks in vitro with L-BSO, which depletes GSH by inhibiting its synthesis, augments TRPM2 currents. Additionally, we demonstrate that GSH inhibits TRPM2 currents through a thiol-independent mechanism, and produces a 3.5-fold shift in the dose-response curve generated by ADPR, the intracellular agonist for TRPM2.
Conclusion
These results indicate that GSH plays a physiologically relevant role in the regulation of TRPM2 currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. This interaction may play an important role in aging and neurological diseases associated with depletion of GSH.
doi:10.1186/1756-6606-5-11
PMCID: PMC3352021  PMID: 22487454
TRPM2; Aging; Glutathione; Oxidative stress; Pyramidal neuron; Primary hippocampal culture
Molecular Brain  2011;4:44.
Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a calcium permeable non-selective cation channel that functions as a sensor of cellular redox status. Highly expressed within the CNS, we have previously demonstrated the functional expression of these channels in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Although implicated in oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death, and potentially in neurodegenerative disease, the physiological role of TRPM2 in the central nervous system is unknown. Interestingly, we have shown that the activation of these channels may be sensitized by co-incident NMDA receptor activation, suggesting a potential contribution of TRPM2 to synaptic transmission. Using hippocampal cultures and slices from TRPM2 null mice we demonstrate that the loss of these channels selectively impairs NMDAR-dependent long-term depression (LTD) while sparing long-term potentiation. Impaired LTD resulted from an inhibition of GSK-3β, through increased phosphorylation, and a reduction in the expression of PSD95 and AMPARs. Notably, LTD could be rescued in TRPM2 null mice by recruitment of GSK-3β signaling following dopamine D2 receptor stimulation. We propose that TRPM2 channels play a key role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.
doi:10.1186/1756-6606-4-44
PMCID: PMC3298512  PMID: 22188973
TRPM2; GSK-3β; PSD-95; Long term depression; Metaplasticity; NMDA Receptors; AMPA Receptors
Futhan is a serine protease inhibitor and medicine in the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and acute pancreatitis. It is metabolized quickly in vivo. Here we show that Futhan reversibly inhibits NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons and GABAA receptors both in hippocampal neurons and in A549 cells, a human alveolar epithelial cell line. The effect of Futhan on GABAA receptors in A549 cells is much more potent than its effect on GABAA receptors in hippocampal neurons (IC50: 0.9 μM V.S. 7.3 μM). Since GABAA receptors are also expressed in various non-neuronal tissues, particularly in airway epithelia and GABA promotes mucus production during asthma, our findings indicate that Futhan may be developed as a novel aerosolized therapeutic to treat asthma through blocking GABAA receptors in the lung.
PMCID: PMC3230258  PMID: 22162781
Asthma; GABAA receptors; NMDA receptors; Futhan; ion channels
Background
The built environment can constrain or facilitate physical activity. Most studies of the health consequences of the built environment suffer from problems of selection bias associated with confounding effects of residential choice and transportation decisions.
Purpose
To examine the cross-sectional associations between objective and perceived measures of the built environment, BMI, obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2), and meeting weekly recommended physical activity (RPA) levels through walking and vigorous exercise. To assess effect of using light rail transit system (LRT) on changes in BMI, obesity, and meeting weekly RPA levels.
Methods
Data were collected on individuals before (July 2006–February of 2007) and after (March 2008–July 2008) completion of a light rail system in Charlotte, NC. BMI, obesity, and physical activity levels were calculated for a comparison of these factors pre- and post-LRT construction. A propensity score weighting approach adjusted for differences in baseline characteristics among LRT and non-LRT users. Data were analyzed in 2009.
Results
More positive perceptions of one’s neighborhood at baseline were associated with a −0.36 (p<.05) lower BMI, 15% lower odds (95% CI=0.77, 0.94) of obesity, 9% higher odds (95% CI = 0.99, 1.20) of meeting weekly RPA through walking, and 11% higher odds (95% CI= 1.01, 1.22) of meeting RPA levels of vigorous exercise. The use of light rail transit to commute to work was associated with an average −1.18 reduction in BMI (p<0.05) and an 81% reduced odds (95% CI= 0.04, 0.92) of becoming obese over time.
Conclusions
The results of this study suggest that improving neighborhood environments and increasing the public’s use of LRT systems could provide improvements in health outcomes for millions of individuals.
doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2010.03.016
PMCID: PMC2919301  PMID: 20621257
PLoS ONE  2011;6(7):e21970.
Together, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) constitute the majority of voltage-independent sodium channels in mammals. ENaC is regulated by a chloride channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Here we show that ASICs were reversibly inhibited by activation of GABAA receptors in murine hippocampal neurons. This inhibition of ASICs required opening of the chloride channels but occurred with both outward and inward GABAA receptor-mediated currents. Moreover, activation of the GABAA receptors modified the pharmacological features and kinetic properties of the ASIC currents, including the time course of activation, desensitization and deactivation. Modification of ASICs by open GABAA receptors was also observed in both nucleated patches and outside-out patches excised from hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, ASICs and GABAA receptors interacted to regulate synaptic plasticity in CA1 hippocampal slices. The activation of glycine receptors, which are similar to GABAA receptors, also modified ASICs in spinal neurons. We conclude that GABAA receptors and glycine receptors modify ASICs in neurons through mechanisms that require the opening of chloride channels.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021970
PMCID: PMC3138761  PMID: 21789198
Objective
The primary objective of this trial was to evaluate the response rate for trimetrexate (TMTX) in conjunction with 5FU and leucovorin (LV) (=TFL) in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer in a phase II, cooperative group setting.
Methods
Patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the stomach received TMTX 110 mg/m2 IV over 60 minutes day 1, followed by 5-FU 500 mg/m2 IV bolus and LV 200 mg/m2 IV over 60 minutes day 2, followed by oral LV 15 mg every 6 hours × 7 doses, all weekly for 6 weeks followed by 2 weeks of rest, continued until progression.
Results
Characteristics for 37 eligible patients: median age 63 (range 23 to 83); male/female: 69%/31%; performance status 0/1/2 15/20/1. The confirmed response rate was 19%, and median overall survival was 6 months. Two patients died as a result of therapy, one due to infection without significant neutropenia, and one due to perforation of a responding gastric lesion. 72% experienced Grades 3 and 4 toxicity, most commonly diarrhea, fatigue, and lymphopenia.
Conclusions
This regimen achieves response rates comparable to other 5FU-based regimens, when used in treatment of incurable gastric cancer. Toxicity appears manageable.
doi:10.1097/COC.0b013e318199fb84
PMCID: PMC2967385  PMID: 19770625
trimetrexate; chemotherapy; gastric neoplasms
Cancer letters  2008;265(2):270-280.
Combination of chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis inhibitors is now commonly employed in the clinic to treat cancer. Here, we used angiostatic agents anginex and 0118, in combination with the chemotherapeutic irofulven, to treat human ovarian tumor xenografts in mice. General linear mixed models were used to statistically analyze tumor growth curves. Overall, combination of a low, non-toxic dose of irofulven with either angiogenesis inhibitor was more effective at inhibiting tumor growth than any of the single-agent therapies. For example, the anginex/irofulven and 0118/irofulven combinations inhibited tumor growth relative to controls by 92% (p<0.0001) and 96% (p<0.0001), respectively, with the 0118/irofulven combinations yielding 100% complete responses. This study suggests that combination therapy of 0118 or anginex and irofulven may be highly effective in the clinical setting.
doi:10.1016/j.canlet.2008.02.048
PMCID: PMC3042303  PMID: 18378392
anginex; irofulven; galectin-1; angiogenesis; chemotherapy
Molecular Brain  2010;3:38.
Concentrations of extracellular divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) fall substantially during intensive synaptic transmission as well as during some pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. Here we report that a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesylate (NM), and several of its analogues, block recombinant TRPM7 currents expressed in HEK293T cells in inverse relationship to the concentration of extracellular divalent cations. Lowering extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ also evokes a divalent-sensitive non-selective cation current that is mediated by TRPM7 expression in hippocampal neurons. In cultured hippocampal neurons, NM blocked these TRPM7-mediated currents with an apparent affinity of 27 μM, as well as the paradoxical Ca2+ influx associated with lowering extracellular Ca2+. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure to NM strongly potentiated TRPM7 currents. In the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular divalent cations, NM activates TRPM7. The stimulating effects of NM on TRPM7 currents are also inversely related to extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+. DAPI and HSB but not netropsin, blocked and stimulated TRPM7. In contrast, mono-cationic, the metabolites of NM, p-GBA and AN, as well as protease inhibitor leupeptin and gabexate failed to substantially modulate TRPM7. NM thus provides a molecular template for the design of putative modulators of TRPM7.
doi:10.1186/1756-6606-3-38
PMCID: PMC3022637  PMID: 21122141
Hippocampus  2009;19(9):779-789.
Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a 28 amino acid peptide which belongs to a superfamily of structurally related peptide hormones including pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). Although several studies have identified the involvement of PACAP in learning and memory, little work has been done to investigate such a role for VIP. At least three receptors for VIP have been identified including the PACAP receptor (PAC1-R) and the two VIP receptors (VPAC receptors). VIP can activate the PAC1-R only if it is used at relatively high concentrations (e.g. 100 nM); however, at lower concentrations (e.g. 1 nM) it is selective for the VPAC receptors. Our lab has showed that PAC1-R activation signals through PKC/CAKβ/Src pathway to regulate NMDA receptors, however there is little known about the potential regulation of NMDA receptors by VPAC receptors. Our studies demonstrated that application of 1nM VIP enhanced NMDA currents by stimulating VPAC receptors as the effect was blocked by VPAC receptor antagonist [Ac-Tyr1, D-Phe2]GRF (1–29). This enhancement of NMDA currents was blocked by both Rp-cAMPS and PKI14–22 (they are highly specific PKA inhibitors), but not by the specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I. In addition, the VIP-induced enhancement of NMDA currents was accentuated by inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4, which inhibits the degradation of cAMP. This regulation of NMDA receptors also required the scaffolding protein AKAP. In contrast, the potentiation induced by high concentration of VIP (e.g. 100 nM) was mediated by PAC1-R as well as by Src kinase. Overall, these results show that VIP can regulate NMDA receptors through different receptors and signaling pathways.
doi:10.1002/hipo.20559
PMCID: PMC2736340  PMID: 19173226
VIP; NMDA receptor; cAMP/PKA; VPAC receptor; AKAP
The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 plays a unique role in intracellular signal transduction by linking Ca2+ influx to tyrosine phosphorylation, but the molecular mechanism of Pyk2 activation is unknown. We report that Pyk2 oligomerization by antibodies in vitro or overexpression of PSD-95 in PC6-3 cells induces trans-autophosphorylation of Tyr402, the first step in Pyk2 activation. In neurons, Ca2+ influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDAR) causes postsynaptic clustering and autophosphorylation of endogenous Pyk2 via Ca2+- and calmodulin-stimulated binding to PSD-95. Accordingly, Ca2+ influx promotes oligomerization and thereby autoactivation of Pyk2 by stimulating its interaction with PSD-95. We show that this mechanism of Pyk2 activation is critical for LTP in the hippocampus CA1 region, which is thought to underlie learning and memory.
doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4992-08.2010
PMCID: PMC2822408  PMID: 20071509
Pyk2; PSD-95; Calmodulin; hippocampus; long-term potentiation; NMDA receptor
Injury Prevention  2010;16(5):327-332.
Objective
To examine whether business improvement districts (BID) contributed to greater than expected declines in the incidence of violent crimes in affected neighbourhoods.
Method
A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to assess the changes in the incidence of violent crimes between 1994 and 2005 and the implementation of 30 BID in Los Angeles neighbourhoods.
Results
The implementation of BID was associated with a 12% reduction in the incidence of robbery (95% posterior probability interval −2 to 24) and an 8% reduction in the total incidence of violent crimes (95% posterior probability interval −5 to 21). The strength of the effect of BID on robbery crimes varied by location.
Conclusion
These findings indicate that the implementation of BID can reduce the incidence of violent crimes likely to result in injury to individuals. The findings also indicate that the establishment of a BID by itself is not a panacea, and highlight the importance of targeting BID efforts to crime prevention interventions that reduce violence exposure associated with criminal behaviours.
doi:10.1136/ip.2009.024943
PMCID: PMC2976613  PMID: 20587814
Child health (paediatrics); community; epidemiology; evaluation; optics and refraction; policy; public health; safe community; violence
NMDA receptor overactivation triggers intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation, which has long been thought to be critical for initiating excitotoxic cell death cascades associated with stroke and neurodegenerative disease. The inability of NMDA receptor antagonists to afford neuroprotection in clinical stroke trials has led to a re-evaluation of excitotoxic models of cell death and has focused research efforts towards identifying additional Ca2+ influx pathways. Recent studies indicate that TRPM2, a member of the TRPM subfamily of Ca2+-permeant, non-selective cation channel, plays an important role in mediating cellular responses to a wide range of stimuli that, under certain situations, can induce cell death. These include reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, tumour necrosis factor as well as soluble oli-gomers of amyloid beta. However, the molecular basis of TRPM2 channel involvement in these processes is not fully understood. In this review, we summarize recent studies about the regulation of TRPM2, its interaction with calcium and the possible implications for neurodegenerative diseases.
PMCID: PMC3047260  PMID: 21383889
TRPM2; oxidative stress; neurodegeneration; amyloid beta; stroke; NMDA receptor
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2008;26(36):5918-5922.
Purpose
CA 19-9 is an important tumor marker in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A secondary end point of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 9704 was prospective evaluation of the ability of postresectional CA 19-9 to predict survival.
Methods
CA 19-9 expression was analyzed as a dichotomized variable (< 180 v ≥ 180) or (≤ 90 v > 90). Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to identify the impact of CA 19-9 expression on overall survival (OS). Actuarial estimates for OS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods.
Results
Three hundred eighty-five patients patients had assessable CA 19-9 levels. The majority had a CA 19-9 level lower than 180 or ≤ 90 (n = 220 and 200, respectively), while 34% were Lewis Antigen negative and 33 (9%) and 53 (14%) patients had levels higher than 180 and higher than 90. When CA 19-9 was analyzed as a dichotomized variable, there was a significant survival difference favoring patients with CA 19-9 lower than 180 (hazard ratio [HR], 3.53; P < .0001). This corresponds to a 72% reduction in the risk of death for patients with a CA 19-9 lower than 180. This was also true for patients with CA 19-9 ≤ 90 (HR, 3.4; P < .0001). Multivariate analyses confirmed that CA 19-9, when analyzed as both a continuous and a dichotomized variable, is a highly significant predictor of OS in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.
Conclusion
To our knowledge, this is the first phase III trial to perform prospective analysis of CA 19-9 levels in patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. It definitively confirms the prognostic importance of postresectional CA 19-9 levels after surgery with curative intent in patients with pancreatic cancer.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2008.18.6288
PMCID: PMC2645109  PMID: 19029412
Background
Residents of socioeconomically disadvantaged locations are more likely to have poor health than residents of socioeconomically advantaged locations and this has been comprehensively mapped in Australian cities. These inequalities present a challenge for the public health workers based in or responsible for improving the health of people living in disadvantaged localities. The purpose of this study was to develop a generic workforce needs assessment tool and to use it to identify the competencies needed by the public health workforce to work effectively in disadvantaged communities.
Methods
A two-step mixed method process was used to identify the workforce needs. In step 1 a generic workforce needs assessment tool was developed and applied in three NSW Area Health Services using focus groups, key stakeholder interviews and a staff survey. In step 2 the findings of this needs assessment process were mapped against the existing National Health Training Package (HLT07) competencies, gaps were identified, additional competencies described and modules of training developed to fill identified gaps.
Results
There was a high level of agreement among the AHS staff on the nature of the problems to be addressed but less confidence indentifying the work to be done. Processes for needs assessments, community consultations and adapting mainstream programs to local needs were frequently mentioned as points of intervention. Recruiting and retaining experienced staff to work in these communities and ensuring their safety were major concerns. Workforce skill development needs were seen in two ways: higher order planning/epidemiological skills and more effective working relationships with communities and other sectors. Organisational barriers to effective practice were high levels of annual compulsory training, balancing state and national priorities with local needs and giving equal attention to the population groups that are easy to reach and to those that are difficult to engage. A number of additional competency areas were identified and three training modules developed.
Conclusion
The generic workforce needs assessment tool was easy to use and interpret. It appears that the public health workforce involved in this study has a high level of understanding of the relationship between the social determinants and health. However there is a skill gap in identifying and undertaking effective intervention.
doi:10.1186/1743-8462-6-10
PMCID: PMC2684114  PMID: 19393091

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